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ROBERT KING'S OKLAHOMA U. S. MARSHALS AND U. S. DEPUTY MARSHALS

Jim Saddler to William Swink

 

 

 

Saddler, Jim was a deputy marshal during the 1870 and 1880 era.  Saddler worked in the Chickasaw and Choctaw Nations, living west of Ardmore.

(Gunman’s Territory)

 

Sage, James W. was commissioned on September 16, 1872, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Logan S. Roots.  Deputy Marshal Sage was living in Skullyville, Choctaw Nation when commissioned.

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Salisbury, John was commissioned in Oklahoma Territory in July of 1894 under Marshal Evett Nix.  He was commissioned again in 1899, when he homesteaded in Pawnee County near Merrimac, during the opening of the strip.  Deputy Marshal Salisbury worked with Deputy Bob Reidner. 

(Chronicles Of Oklahoma - Volume 46, 1968) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Salmon, Bart was remembered in Pioneer History as an outstanding deputy marshal who served with John Salmon. 

(Indian Pioneer History - Samuel L. Davis)

 

Salmon, Dave rode with Deputy Marshals Heck Thomas, L.P. Isbel and Dave Rusk in 1889, trying to capture Cherokee outlaw, Ned Christie.  Christie was wanted for the murder of Deputy Marshal Dan Maple.  Christie sought protection in his cabin which was occupied by his wife and son.   The officers, surrounding the cabin ordered Christie to surrender.  Giving little regard for his family’s safety, Christie opened fire on the lawmen.  After a short gun battle Christie’s cabin was set on fire.  Christie’s wife and son ran from the cabin when the flames engulfed their home.  Deputy Marshals Rusk and Salmon fired at the boy not knowing who he was.  Bullets struck the boy in the hip and lungs leaving the boy critically wounded.  Christie ran from the burning cabin firing as he tried to run to safety.  One of the officers shot the outlaw directly in the face striking him on the nose, breaking the bone and exiting out the eye, blinding Christie in one eye.  Christie was taken to a home owned by friends where he was nursed him back to health.  See: “The Capture Of Ned Christie” for more information on the Cherokee outlaw.  In January of 1889, Salmon was working under Marshal John Carroll when the lawman played a part in the killing of Wesley Barnett, the man who killed Deputy Marshal John Phillips.

(Heck Thomas) (Black, Red and Deadly)

 

Salmon, John was commissioned on February 2, 1889, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  In December of 1889, Deputy Marshal Salmon captured a horse thief named Rober Cloud, along with five other men who were arrested on charges of introducing whiskey in Indian Territory.  On August 4, 1891, Deputy Marshal Jim Yates and Bob Marshall, a merchant from South McAlester were playing cards in the wee hours of the night.  Yates came out winner of the game which ended in a row during which Yates abused him considerably.  A disgruntled Marshall left to secure his gun, returning to kill the marshal in ambush.  Deputy Marshals George Williams and John Salmons were in South McAlester at the time of the incident and were called to the murder scene to make the investigation.  He was commissioned again on June 1, 1893, serving under Marshal George J. Crump. In December of 1893, Salmon traveled to Brazil, Choctaw Nation to arrest a white man named Jack Petty, who was charged with larceny.  Petty was taken to the federal jail in Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Elevator - August 7, 1891) (The Weekly  Elevator - August 4, and September 22, 1893) (Indian Pioneer History - Samuel L. Davis) (Indian Pioneer History - John Salmon) (Atoka Indian Citizen - January 18, 1890) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Salyers, M. V .B. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Sanders, Bud killed Kelp Queen in June of 1885, during a train robbery.  Deputy Marshal Sanders worked out of the Cooweescoowee District. 

(Law West Of Fort Smith) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

M. S. Sanders

 

October 8, 1952--The Oklahoman--J. M.  Sanders, 90, of 1315 Exchange avenue, pioneer state resident and one-time deputy U. S. Marshal, died Tuesday night in St. Anthony hospital of a heart ailment.  Services are pending at Street &
Draper funeral home.  Burial will be in Verden.

          Born near Denton, Texas Sanders came to Oklahoma in 18784.  Before statehood he served as a deputy U. S. marshal.  An '89er, he homesteaded near Jones.

          Sanders made his home in Oklahoma City for the past 25 years.  He was a Mason and a member of the Odd Fellows lodge.

          Survivors include two sons, Leo Sanders, 631 NE 17 and Earl F. Sanders, 1602 Birch; seven grandchildren; 12 great-grandchildren and 18 nieces and nephews.

 

Sanders, J. W. was commissioned on February 2, 1885, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal John Carroll.  Sanders was Stenographer for the court.  Sanders lived in Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Sanders, Lee was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Sanders, Lige was remembered as a deputy marshal who served around 1904, by D. L. Mayes, in an Indian Pioneer History interview.  A boy with bad manners was making bad remarks about people around him.  When the boy started directing his bad remarks toward Maye’s girl friend Mayes struck the young rowdy over the head with his pistol.  As the boy fell to the floor, Mayes started backing toward the door expecting trouble from the rowdies' brother.  The brother went for his gun but was relieved of it when a man standing at the door grasped it.  Deputy Marshal Lige Sander came into the building asking the whereabouts of his friend Mayes.  The officer quickly relieved the rowdies of all of their weapons. 

(Indian Pioneer History - D. L. Mayes)

 

Sanders, S. “Lewis  arrested a Cherokee Indian, John Coon in January of 1890, for introducing whiskey in the Cherokee Nation. 

(Atoka Indian Citizen - January 18, 1890) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Sanders, Uriah B.  was commissioned on January 7, 1870, in the District Court at Van Buren, Arkansas, serving under Marshal William A. Britton.  Deputy Marshal Sanders lived in Galley Rock, Pope County, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Sapper    

E.

J.

D.U.S. Marshal

December 28, 1906 to June 30, 1907

 

Sapulpa, James was commissioned on July 16, 1894, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George J. Crump.  Deputy Marshal Sapulpa lived in Sapulpa, Creek Nation. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Sarber, John N. was commissioned on August 27, 1890, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Satterfield, F. G. was commissioned on July 31, 1891, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  In August of 1891, Satterfield arrested Joseph Boyd on charges of adultery, taking him to the federal jail in Ft. Smith, Arkansas, to await trial.  In August of 1892, Deputy Marshal Satterfield was working in the Cherokee Nation when he arrested a white man, Jack Stander on liquor charges for introducing whiskey into Indian Territory.

(Ft. Smith Elevator - August 28, 1891) (The Weekly Elevator - August 12, 1892) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Saunders, Samuel L. was commissioned on November 4, 1889, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Savage, Christopher C. was commissioned on May 4, 1894, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George J. Crump.  Deputy Marshal Savage lived in Ft. Smith, Arkansas when commissioned.  Savage’s name is shown in the Clerk Account for Commissions in the Circuit Court For Western District of Arkansas, Volume 1 & 2; May 6, 1889 to November 4, 1893, peg. 435. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Savage, F. C. was commissioned on August 6, 1892, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database. (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Sawyers, Arch L.  was commissioned on July 28, 1890, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  In February of 1890, Deputy Marshal Sawyers served a warrant of arrest to Jess Sunday for introducing and selling whiskey in Indian Territory. 

(Atoka Indian Citizen - February 15, 1890) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Scales, Clinton was commissioned on January 31, 1895, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, while living in Hayden, Indian Territory.  He worked with Ike Rogers, near Nowata in January of 1895, to capture outlaw Crawford Goldsby alias “Cherokee Bill”.  Ike Rogers developed a plan to capture the outlaw.  “Cherokee Bill” had a liking for Ike Roger’s niece so it was easy to lure him to Roger’s home.  After supper, as the evening grew late Rogers invited Bill to stay overnight.  Clint Scales had the privilege of sleeping with “Cherokee Bill” who had both his Winchester rifle and revolver on his body when he turned in.  The plan was for Scales to grab the young outlaw and hold him until Rogers came to his assistance to shackle him.  Every time Scales got into position to apprehend him, Bill would reposition. Scales tried all that night but never got an opportunity to subdue him.  The next morning Bill was invited to stay for breakfast.  As Bill ate his breakfast, his six shooter lay beside his plate.  After eating breakfast Bill went outside to saddle his horse then returned to tell his girl friend good-bye.   After giving his adieu, Bill rolled a cigarette, asking for a light which neither Rogers nor Scales had.  Bill then made the mistake of reaching into the fireplace to light a stick.  As quick as a cat, Ike Rogers grabbed an iron poker striking Bill over the head, knocking him to the floor.  Scales and Rogers jumped on their prey, pinning him to the floor, where they hand-cuffed and shackled him.  “Cherokee Bill” was taken to Ft. Smith, Arkansas using an alternate route, for the marshals feared the regular route through Webber Falls would be infiltrated with “Cherokee Bill’s” friends.  The nineteen year old “Cherokee Bill” was one of the most feared outlaws in Indian Territory, having a “Dead or Alive” reward on his head and being on Judge Parker’s most wanted list.  Deputy Marshal Sequoyah Houston was killed when he tried to bring the young outlaw to justice when Bill was riding with the Cook gang.   “Cherokee Bill” killed a jailer while trying to escape from murder’s row in the Ft. Smith federal jail.  Crawford Goldsby’s life came to an end at the Ft. Smith gallows on March 17 1896. 

(Indian Pioneer History - Burl Taylor) (Black Red and Deadly) (Picture-Hell on the Border - Harman) (Picture - Outlaws on Horseback) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Schell, Leo S. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Schneider    

Frank

O.

D.U.S. Marshal

Ardmore

February 3, 1902

 

Schoolfield    

J.

L.

D.U.S. Marshal

Antlers

March 11, 1905

 

Schuster, Anton was commissioned on September 7, 1891, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Scoffern    

R.

F.

D.U.S. Marshal

Chickasha

April 1, 1906

 

Scoresby, Oliver C. was commissioned in July of 1894, serving under Marshal Evett Nix at Pond Creek, Oklahoma Territory. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Oliver C. Scoresby

 

May 30, 1945--The Oklahoman--Services for Oliver C. Scoresby, 77. former U. S. deputy marshal, who died Friday, will be 2 p.m. Tuesday at the Smith Kernke funeral home, with burial in Fairlawn.

 

Scott, A. C. was commissioned on April 30, 1894, in the Western District at Ft. Smith Arkansas.  Deputy Marshal Scott was from Louisville, Kentucky. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Scott, George W. was commissioned on May 9, 1896, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  Deputy Marshal Scott lived in San Bois, Indian Territory when commissioned. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Scott, Green was commissioned on March 24, 1892, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Scott, John was commissioned on June 10, 1871, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Logan S. Roots.  Deputy Marshal Scott lived in Ft. Smith, Arkansas when commissioned. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Scott, Richard “Dick” was commissioned on May 11, 1891, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes.  In January of 1892, he was sent to the Cherokee Nation to serve a warrant of arrest to Lew Emerson on charges of introducing and selling liquor in Indian Territory.  Emerson was taken to the federal jail in Ft. Smith, Arkansas to await trial.  He was summoned to Alma to serve a warrant of arrest to Tolbert Wilson on larceny charges. 

(Ft. Smith Elevator - January 8, March 18, 1892) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Scott, Thomas H. was commissioned on May 1, 1871, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Logan S. Roots.  Deputy Marshal Scott lived in Ft. Smith when commissioned. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Scott, Walter W. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Scottie, John was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Scoval, was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes.  He worked with Deputy Marshal T. A. Twyman in the Chickasaw Nation. 

(Atoka Independent - November 23, 1877)

 

Scriber, L .E  was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Scrivner, E. H. served under Marshal J. J.   McAlester in Southern Indian Territory.  Scrivener held commission as deputy marshal for six years around the Wynnewood and Pauls Valley areas. Scrivener was born in 1855 coming from Tennessee to the Choctaw Nation in 1888.  Deputy Marshal Scrivner arrested outlaw, Bill Lewis two times on murder charges.  Lewis told Scrivner he had killed fourteen men in his lifetime.  Bill Lewis was killed during a shootout with Deputy Marshal John Walner of Wynnewood.

(Indian Pioneer History - E. H. Srivener)

 

Scruggs, George was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshals Valentine Dell, Thomas Boles and John Carroll.  He rode with Deputy Marshal James N. Cole before 1882, into Indian Territory where they served several warrants of arrest to whiskey peddlers and robbers.  In January of 1886, he brought in two white men who were charged with introducing liquor into Indian Territory. 

(Ft. Smith Elevator - January 8, 1886) (Indian Pioneer History - James N. Cole) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Seabolt, M. A. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Picture - Muskogee Genealogical Society)

 

Seale, was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Seargall, Ralph, In January of 1903, was riding on a railway car with two other deputy marshals, all from Kinta, Indian Territory.  The officers were trying to capture a desperado, who was known to be riding the Kansas City Southern train.  When the railway car neared Coal Creek the officers located the desperado and tried to overpower him.  The outlaw met the deputy marshals with great resistance.  The lawmen did not fair to well in the gun battle that followed for Samuel Sorrels and another deputy marshal was killed, with Ralph Seargall being wounded. 

(Woodward Bulletin - January 9, 1903)

 

Searle, J. W. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Searls was commissioned in the Western District of Arkansas, serving under Marshal Thomas Boles.  In August of 1884, Searls arrested Sampson Anderson and Danford Smith charged with larceny.  The two thieves were transported to federal court in Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  In October of 1885, Searls worked the Choctaw Nation out of the Western District Court.  (Indian Champion -  August 14, 1884) (Black Red And Deadly) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Sears, Dave was commissioned in the Northern District Indian Territory serving under Marshal Leo Bennett.   He was assigned to the Osage Nation working out of the Pawhuska court for twelve years.  Dave lost his commission on July 1, 1901.  (The Osage Journal, Pawhuska - July 4, 1901) (Indian Pioneer History - George D. Castoe)

 

Seatle, was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Sebourn, W. W. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Secor, William served in the Central District in 1894. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Self, J N. served in the Central District in 1894. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Selley, Isaac E. was commissioned on March 16, 1892, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office)

 

Sellman, S. D. was commissioned in 1895, in Oklahoma Territory under Marshal Evett Nix. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Selridge, George was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Logan Roots.  He was killed on April 15, 1872, trying to remove Zeke Proctor from the Cherokee Indian police court.  During the gun battle several deputy marshals were killed and wounded. 

(Indian Pioneer History - Zeke Proctor) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Oklahombres)

 

Selvidge, William H. served in the Northern Judicial District in 1894.  (

U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Serivner, was commissioned in the Southern District of Indian Territory, Ardmore District, serving under Marshal Lucius Stowe.  In 1891, Deputy Marshal Serivner transported thief, Charley Blevin charged with stealing hogs to the federal court in Purcell, Chickasaw Nation.  Two witnesses, Bill Short, a witness for the prosecution and John Elrod, a witness for Blevin were also traveling with the deputy marshal.   When the train stopped at Pauls valley, Elrod stepped into the passenger car, where Short hit him over the left eye with a coupling pin.  The blow, hard enough to kill a person, and left Elrod unconscious, with a long deep gash on his face.  After striking the blow, the cowardly Smith ran, with Deputy Marshal Serivner following, in hot pursuit.  Serivner was unable to capture Smith as he left the train at Pauls Valley.  Elrod was still on the train as it pulled out of Pauls Valley leaving Serivner and Blevins behind.

 (The Territorial Topic - October 1, 1891)

 

Serrell, Surrell, John R. worked in the Western District, Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal John Sarber.  On March 6, 1874, three mules were stole from McAlester Station.  Marshal J. J. McAlester alerted a posse of three men that included Deputy Marshal Serrell, who went in pursuit of Wallace Small and Bill Hemphill.  When the thieves neared Tishomingo, Chickasaw Nation they turned the mules loose, clearing their trail, allowing them to escape.

 (Caddo Starr - February 27, 1874) (Indian Pioneer History - Joe Southern) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Serrill, Morris A. served as deputy marshal in 1893. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Settle

Fred

D.U.S. Marshal

April 19, 1905

 

Josh Lee Aid Wins Job As U. S.
Deputy

 

September 12, 1936--The Oklahoman--Fred Settle, Edmond automobile salesman, Friday was appointed deputy United States marshal by W. C. Geers, marshal, effective Tuesday.

          The appointment was made upon recommendation of Josh Lee, Democratic candidate for the senate, Geers said, and was approved by

Senator Elmer Thomas.

          Settle worked for Lee in the primary campaign, as Lee's driver and operator of his public address system.

          Settle will fill a vacancy caused by the death in an automobile accident August 17 of John Reubin.

 

Seval      

J.

R.

D.U.S. Marshal

July 1, 918 to September 4, 1918

 

Severn, Joe O. was commissioned in Oklahoma Territory.  He also was known as George Orin Severns.   After the Dalton gang robbed a train at Wharton, Severn and George Thornton was summoned to try to arrest the gang.  Deputy Marshal Severn served under Marshal Evett Nix in July 15, 1893, at Guthrie, Oklahoma Territory with Deputy Marshal Heck Thomas.  Marshal Jones appointed him as an 1899 Land Rush deputy marshal.  (Chronicles Of Oklahoma - Volume 35, 1957) (West of Hell’s Fringe) (Charles Francis Colcord) (Oklahombres) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Sevier, William was a member of the posse, on January 1889 that killed murderer Wesley Barnett, who was charged with killing Deputy Marshall John Phillips.  Sevier working with fellow officer’s Salmon, Barnell and McNac confronted Wesley Barnett near Okmulgee where he resisted arrest. (Black Red And Deadly)

 

Sexton, Alexander was commissioned on October 24, 1889, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George Crump.  Sexton was commissioned again on June 26, 1890. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Sexton, Robert A. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal John Carroll.  In December of 1885, Deputy Marshal Sexton arrested two white men for introducing and selling whiskey in Indian Territory.  Both men were taken to the federal jail in Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Elevator - December 4, 1885) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Sexton, Thomas J.  was commissioned in 1904, at the Southern District Indian Territory as office deputy in Durant, by Marshal George K. Pritchard, Choctaw Nation.  On September 26, 1906, Deputy Marshal Sexton arrested D. H. Mayberry on a bench warrant for the murder of John Reed.  The prisoner was taken to Ft. Smith, Arkansas to stand trial.   On November 11, 1906, Sexton had the privilege of arresting Tom Tate, one of the most hated men in the Choctaw Nation.  He came to the Choctaw Nation from Texas with his father, mother, mother-in-law, child wife, and several of his wife’s younger brothers and sisters.  The three families lived in a cabin seven miles southeast of Colbert, Choctaw Nation.  The family lived in poverty making their living picking cotton in the fields near the Colbert and Sterrett area.  Those living near the Tates questioned the mysterious death of Tom’s father, mother, and mother-in-law.  Their ages and physical condition made their deaths controversial.  Tom Tate was an overseer of the children, taking them to the cotton fields each day, before daylight where they were forced to work the fields, tilling or picking cotton until darkness.  Tate expected the children to do more work than they were capable of performing, if they did not produce enough work or if they fell from exhaustion, Tate would hit them with anything he could get his hands on or kick them like a dog.  The little children carried bruises and marks on their small bodies that only a demon could have inflicted.  The amount of the food given to the children was very little and not suitable.  When the children’s day ended they were taken to a dugout near Tate’s cabin where they slept.  One morning after a cold night in the dugout, one of the little girls came into the house to get sympathy from her older sister, Tom Tate’s wife.  As the little girl, probably six or seven years old, complained of being cold and not feeling good, she was confronted by the bully, Tom Tate.  Tate told her he would give her something that would take care of her problem.  She was given a dose of medicine, moments later the little girl slumped to the floor where she died, her agony and pain was over.  Soon after the little girl’s death, Tom Tate took the children to the Sterrett area where they went to a field to pick cotton.  Two of the Sterrett residents, hearing of the children's situation went to see with their own eyes what was happening.  What they saw was detestable, for the little children were forced to work under the threat of a lash.  The two men, a Mr. Black and Mr. Gray went to Tom Tate asking him if he would give up the children.  Tate said he would if they would take them at once.  Mr. Black took one of the little boys back to Sterrett with him.  The next day Mr. Gray returned back to the fields taking all of the little girls back with him.  After observing the children, the Sterrett people found evidence that the children were terribly abused.   Marks, bruises and scars were found on their little bodies revealing a portion of the abuse that they were put through.  When the stories from the children were told, they unbearable to listen to as they described the pain, fear, and suffering they were put through.  The death of the little girl was a horrible thing but it saved the remaining four little girls and two boys from a fearful fate.  Tom Tate was taken to Atoka, Choctaw Nation where he was placed under a $10,000 bond which he could not raise. Before the judge placed sentence upon Tate he looked him in the eye and told him; “It does not make any difference what sentence this court gives you because someday you will stand in a higher court and it would have been better for you not to have ever been born.  See Deputy Marshal Tom Latham for additional information. 

(The Choctaw News - June 2, 1904) (The Bennington Tribune - November 8, 1906) (The Sterrett Sun - November 16, 1906) (The Durant Statesman - November 30, 1906; April 5, 19, 1907) (Picture - The Durant Statesman - April 12, 1907) (Lenora Leader - September 13, 1907)

 

Sexton        

Thomas

J.

D.U.S. Marshal

Durant

April 1, 1904--March 21, 1905  

 

Shadley, Lafayette "Lafe” was commissioned in Oklahoma Territory serving under Marshal Evett Nix.  He was one of the thirteen deputy marshals that rode to Ingalls, Oklahoma to capture the Doolin Gang.  Deputy Marshals from Stillwater and Guthrie traveled in two wagons which concealed the deputy marshals under a canvas top.  The officers, under the direction of Deputy Marshal John Hixon, arrived at Ingalls where they waited for their leader to direct them in battle.  The outlaws detected the officers before they could make their surprise attack.  A gun battle erupted where the deputy marshals came up on the short end.  Deputy Marshals Lafe Shadley Tom Houston and Dick Speed were killed while only gang members, Bill Dalton and George “Bitter Creek” Newcomb were wounded.  Lafe Shadley died on September 3, 1893 from mortal wounds he received in the “Ingalls Battle”.  Roy Daugherty alias “Arkansas Tom” alias “Tom Jones” positioned in a window of an upstairs window of a hotel was given credit of killing the three lawmen. “Arkansas Tom” surrendered to the marshal’s forces when the lawmen threatened to blow up the hotel.  Tom was the only gang member to be captured.  See the narrative on Deputy Marshal Orrington “Red” Lucas for a more detailed account of the Ingall’s Battle. The Dalton gang offered to surrender to serve two years in the penitentiary for the murder of Shadley, Tom Houston and Dick Speed. 

(The Eagle Gazette - January 19, 1894) (Indian Pioneer History - Orrington “Red” Lucas) (Indian Pioneer History - William N.  Randolph) (Oklahombres) (West Of Hell’s Fringe) (Experience Of A U.S. Deputy Marshal) (Selden Lindsey) (Bill Tilghman) (Purple Sage) (Bill Doolin O. T.) (Shoot from the Lip) (Ghost Town - Tales Of Oklahoma) (Frontier Trails)  (Outlaws on Horseback) (The Marshals Monitor - Microsoft Internet Explorer) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)     Killed in the line of duty.

 

Shafer, John W. was commissioned on November 24, 1886, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes.  (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

(Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Shaffer, Ed was shot and killed in August of 1905, near Boley, a Negro settlement across the Lincoln county line.  Deputy Marshal Shaffer was summoned to arrest horse thief, Dick Simmons.  Simmons was aware that Shaffer was coming to arrest him, so he set up an ambush for the deputy marshal.  Simmons took cover behind a clump of bushes where he fired the fatal shot that took the officer’s life.  Before Shaffer died, he raised his body with his elbow, firing his weapon, which killed Simmons instantly.  Ed Shaffer died five minutes after killing his assassin. 

(The Putnam Pioneer - September 1, 1905)  Killed in the line of duty.

 

Shaffer, Sam was commissioned in Oklahoma Territory under Marshal Evett Dumas Nix.  He came from Texas and was given credit for killing outlaws George Newcomb and Charley Pierce on May 3, 1895, in Payne County.  George Newcomb alias “Bitter Creek” alias “Slaughter Kid” was shot in the forehead and Charlie Pierce was shot with buckshot.  Charlie Pierce was a half brother to “Tulsa Jack” Blake, who was killed by Deputy Marshal Dudley Banks in Cheyenne country, a week earlier.  Will and Bee Dunn rode with the Bill Doolin gang but went against their own gang to avoid arrest.  The outlaws were lured to the home of the Dunn brothers in Pawnee, Oklahoma Territory where they were met by Shaffer and six other marshals on a moonlight night.  Charlie Pierce was killed outright while Bitter Creek died trying to make a fight.  Newcomb, Pierce and “Tulsa Jack” were members of the Bill Doolin gang.  Note: The Chronicles Of Oklahoma brings to note that Charlie Pierce was not “Dynamite Dick” as several article showed.  Outlaws, Dick Ainsley and Clifton were both known as “Dynamite Dick”.  They were called Dynamite because they dug a hole in their bullets, placed dynamite in them and filled the hole with lead.  When the bullet struck its mark, there was a double punch, bursting what it hit. 

(South & West, Beaver - May 9, 1895) (The Alva Chronicle - May 10, 1895) (Chronicles Of Oklahoma - Volume 36, 1958) (Shoot from the Lip)

 

Shaver, W. D. “Dick” was commissioned on August 25, 1890.  He was reported killed, with no date of death from Oklahombres.

(Oklahombres) (Black Red and Deadly) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Shaw, A. P. was assigned to Paden, Indian Territory.  He related an account of Deputy Marshal John Kitchen’s arrest of a noted Negro whiskey peddler. 

(Muskogee Weekly Phoenix - March 2, 1905)

 

Shaw    

A.

P.

D.U.S. Marshal

December 15, 1960 to June 30, 197

 

Shaw, Charles was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Shaw, J. H. was commissioned on June 15, 1891, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, under Marshal Jacob Yoes.  He was commissioned again on June 24, 1899, by Marshal Solomon Stahl.  In June of 1892, Bunk Shaw served a warrant of arrest to Billy alias “Nathan Jones” and Henry Colbert for introducing and selling in the Choctaw Nation. 

(Ft. Smith Elevator - July 17, 1892) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Shaw, Jeff, D. was commissioned in Oklahoma Territory by Marshal Warren Lurty.  He was a very active deputy marshal that served in late 1889 and 1890’s.   He arrested three Negro thieves, Charley Bolen, Abe and Jerre Van, who had a warrant of arrest with a charge of larceny.  The three had eluded the law for some time.  In April of 1893, James Mattingly and William Thromsbrue of Hackett City, Indian Territory were arrested for cutting timber.  Shaw was commissioned on June 26, 1893 when he lived in Cache, Indian Territory. 

(Ft. Smith Elevator - August 30, 1889; May 9, 1890) (The Weekly Elevator - March 3, May 5, 1893) (Atoka Indian Citizen - December 28, 1889, March 8, 15, 29, April 26, and May 17, 1890) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Shawhan, L. D. was commissioned at Wetumka, Western District of Indian Territory in April of 1906, serving under Marshal Leo Bennett.  He was riding along a country road near Wetumka when he was ambushed by an Indian, Tom Spaniard.  Spaniard shot at the deputy marshal but his shot failed to hit its mark.  Shawhan arrested Spaniard and placed him in jail at Muskogee, where he was charged with attempt to kill.

(The Lenora Leader - April 20, 1906) (Marietta Monitor - August 10, 1906)

 

Shawhan     

L.

D.

D.U.S. Marshal

March 21, 1905

 

Shelbourne, B. T. was commissioned on June 1, 1889, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes.  He was commissioned again on June 21, 1889, June 17, 1893, when he lived in McAlester, Choctaw Nation.   In March of 1890, Shelbourne arrested two men for introducing liquor into Indian Territory.  In July of 1890, he was working with Deputy Marshal William Ellis when they served warrants of arrest to eleven men for selling Choctaw Beer at Harthshorn, Choctaw Nation.  (Atoka Indian Citizen - March 15, 1890) (Ft. Smith Elevator - July 25, 1890) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Shelbourne, Tom was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes.  He arrested John Ingram in May of 1890, on charges of assault to kill.  In April, 1890, Deputy Marshal Shelbourne arrested two men, James Roach, and Robert Glover on assault charges.  (Atoka Indian Citizen - February 1, 15, April 19, May 3,17, 1890) (The Weekly Elevator - December 2, 1892, May 19, 26, 1893) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Sheldon 

William

D.U.S. Marshal

April 2, 1905

 

Marshal Fatally Injured In Brawl

Ex-Policeman Attacks U. S. Officer With an Iron Poker on Train

 

October 18, 1915--Muskogee, OK--William Sheldon of Grove, a deputy United States marshal, is at the point of death in a local hospital, the victim of a brutal attack by William Rupert, a former policeman.  The fight occurred upon a Katy passenger train a short distance from Muskogee.

          Sheldon, who was bringing a prisoner from Miami to the federal jail here is said to have taken some whiskey away from Rupert, also a passenger. After taking the whiskey, Sheldon went back to his seat with his prisoner.  Then Rupert, picking up a stove poker in the rear of the car, went toward the front of the car where Sheldon was seated.

          "Here's where I get a United States marshal," Rupert is report to have said as he struck Sheldon a terrific blow over the head from behind.  Passengers say that the deadly missive in Rupert's hand rose and fell at least nine times before Sheldon arose and grappled with his assailant.  Two passengers went to the assistance of the deputy and there was panic while Sheldon fought to place the handcuffs on Rupert.  After Rupert was overpowered, Sheldon collapsed but remained with his prisoners until he reached Muskogee when police and passengers assisted him into the depot from where an ambulance was summoned.  Police took the prisoners to the federal jail where both are locked up.

          Sheldon was immediately place upon the operating table and physicians after examining his wounds stated that his skull was fractured and his recover is doubtful.

 

Shennelt, Frank was buried in a cemetery in Tulsa, located on second street and Frisco.  Another deputy marshal buried in the same cemetery was William Moody who was killed on March 15, 1889. 

(Indian Pioneer History - Chauncey C. Moore)

 

Shepherd, D. W. was commissioned on February 3, 1896, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George Crump.  (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Shepherd, Ervin was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Shephard  

H.

W.

D.U.S. Marshal

Altus

November 19, 1907

 

Shibley, A. B. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.

 (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Shibley, Bill was remembered as a deputy marshal working in the Claremore District.  Deputy Marshal Shipley tried to serve a warrant of arrest to a Cherokee Indian, named Walter Johnson who was noted as a very tough character.  An altercation occurred when Johnson resisted arrest, which led to a shoot out resulting in the death of Walter Johnson.   The corners jury returned a verdict the deputy marshal had the authority to kill Johnson.  (The Enid Weekly Sun - October 6, 1898) (Indian Pioneer History - William Carnahan) (Indian Pioneer History - Charles Huckleberry Rogers)

 

Shibley, J. W. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Shipley 

W.

E.

D.U.S. Marshal

January 16, 1899

 

Shirey, Thomas was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Shockey, L. T. was commissioned on June 1, 1893, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George Crump. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Shockey  

Leander

T.

D.U.S. Marshal

May 1, 1899

 

Shockley, John W. was commissioned on June 12, 1893, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George Crump.  Deputy Marshal Shockely was working in the Choctaw Nation, near Cameron where he arrested Babe Beard.  Beard and neighbor Jones entered into an argument over stock that led to an altercation and resulted in Beard pulling his gun and hitting his victim in the head, killing him.  Beard was transported to the federal jail in Ft. Smith, Arkansas where he stood trial.  In September of 1894, he brought into the federal jail at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, a white man named J.P. Searling, from Cameron, who was charged with adultery. 

(The Weekly Elevator - (January 27, July 27, December 22, 1893) (Ft. Smith Elevator - September 7, 1894) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Shoemaker, Andrew L. was commissioned on August 13, 1886, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes.  (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Shoemaker, Benjamin F. was commissioned on January 8, 1870, in the District Court at Van Buren, Arkansas, serving under Marshal William Britton.  Deputy Marshal Shoemaker lived in Van Buren, Arkansas when commissioned in 1870, and lived in Fayetteville, Washington County, Arkansas when commissioned on May 25, 1871, by Marshal Logan S. Roots.  The court was moved to the Western District court at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.

 (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Shoemaker  

J.

S.

D.U.S. Marshal

Enid

November 19, 1907

 

Shook, C. C. was commissioned in Oklahoma Territory, in July of 1895 at Pawnee, Oklahoma Territory, serving under Marshal Evett Nix.

 (U.S. Deputy Marshals. I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Short, Ed was commissioned under Marshal William Grimes in Oklahoma Territory and previously worked under Marshal Evett Nix.  On May 8, 1891, the Dalton gang robbed the Santa Fe Railroads Texas Express when it passed through Wharton.  The Santa Fe reported the total loss of money at $1500.  When word of the holdup reached the federal office in Guthrie a posse was sent out which was to no avail for the gang seemed to disappear.  After dividing the loot the gang went separate ways to let things cool down before pulling another robbery.  One of the gang members, Charles “Black Faced” Bryant became very ill with malaria in July of 1891 and was taken to Hennessey where his doctor ordered him to bed.  His new home became the Rock Island Hotel where he was cared for by the gang and local people.  An informant reported Bryant staying at the hotel and his part in the Wharton train robbery to Deputy Marshal Short.  When a waitress went to his hotel room, Short followed close behind and covered him with his Winchester, enabling him to make the arrest without any confrontation.  Bryant was placed in handcuffs and taken to the Hennessey jail.  The marshals decided that Bryant should be shipped to the federal jail in Wichita, Kansas because it would be to difficult to try to transport him through Indian Territory.  Ed Short loaded him on the first northbound train on August 23, 1891.  Several informers warned Short that he should expect the Dalton gang to try to release Bryant before he got to Wichita.   Short decided the best place to hold his prisoner would be in the baggage express car and not the passenger car.  Bryant was handcuffed with his hands to his back when he was loaded on the train but Short weakened to Bryant’s pleas and placed the cuff to the front of his body.  When the train reached Waukomis, just five miles north of Hennessey the train made a stop at a section house.  Several men were observed riding across the prairie at a very fast rate of speed which got Short’s attention, forcing him to step out on the platform to evaluate the situation.  Before leaving the express car he gave the express man a revolver which he carelessly placed unattended on the mail desk.  Sneaking across the car without being noticed, the manacled Bryant secured the revolver ordering the express man to go to the far end of the car.  When Short opened the boxcar door he caught a glimpse of his prisoner which caused him to whirl with his Winchester rifle.  Shooting at the same instant, both men emptied their weapons leaving Bryant and Short mortally wounded.  Charles Bryant crawled to the edge of the platform where Short grabbed him thinking he was about to escape.  Changing the cuffs on Bryant cost Ed Short his life.  Marshal Grimes worked in behalf of Ed Short’s mother to get the $500 reward that Wells Fargo Express Company was offering for the capture of Charlie Bryant for the Santa Fe train robbery at Wharton.  Charley Bryant was suspected to have taken part in several other robberies with the Doolin gang.  Bryant came from Wise County, Texas and was known in that area as a well respected cowboy until he came into association with the Oklahoma outlaws.  It was reported in the Kingfisher Times that Deputy Marshal Leon Debost had the pistol worn by Ed Short when he was killed. Short was a small but courageous man who spent most of his life working in law enforcement.  During the Stevens County war of 1886, he served as city marshal of Woodsdale, Kansas and served as deputy sheriff at Caldwell, Kansas which was on the Chisholm Trail.  Short’s body was sent to his mother for burial in the east and Bryant's body was claimed by his relatives.  Ed Shorts’ mother eventually received $1000 reward for Charley Bryant.

(The Territorial Topic - September 17, November 5, 1891) (Kingfisher Times - June 30, 1892) (Encyclopedia for a Gun -Fighter) (West of Hell’s Fringe) (Bill Doolin O. T.) (Shoot from the Lip)  (Oklahombres) (Outlaws on Horseback) (No Man’s Land)   K

 

MURDER MOST FOUL

Terrible Double Tragedy On The Rock Island

Ed Short Loses His Life

 

August 27, 1891—Kingfisher Free Press—For the past eight months there has been an organized band of desperadoes engaged in stealing horses, robbing trains and committing all manner of depredation.  Every effort of the officers to locate and capture them has been unsuccessful.  Until recently this gang was satisfied to seal an occasional horse or run off a Texas steer, but in May the Daltons met at Mulhall, Charlie Bryant and a pal named Bailey.

The Wharton Robbery

A scheme was contracted to rob a passenger train on the Santa Fe road.  They selected as the scene of operations, a lonely spot near Wharton junction.  For several days they loitered in that vicinity and finally in the latter part of May they attacked the midnight express and secured several thousand dollars from the express companies.

          An old woman named Hanby tells that the day before the robbery four men at dinner at her house.  She describes them accurately and there is no question of the identity of Bryant in the gang.  Another thing which the officers believe strongly connects the Daltons with the affair is the fact that at the time of the Wharton robbery, two brothers were in jail in California for train robbery and considerable money was needed to push their defense.  It is further known that before the robbery, the gang was very hard up and that afterwards they had plenty of money.  After the Wharton affair, and about the first of June, the Daltons were heard of at Kiowa, Kansas, where they ventured in to purchase supplies.  Here one of the men stood guard at the back door with his Winchester, while another kept constant grip on his revolver.  This clue set the officer on their track.  United States Marshal Grimes decided that they were hiding in the Strip probably west of the Rock Island railroad.

Deputy Short Set At Work

          A few weeks ago he detailed Deputy Marshal Short to work up the case.  Short was in Kingfisher last Thursday and Friday in consolation with Marshal Grimes and returned to Hennessey Friday afternoon.  He was very confident that he had the crowd located.  He learned Saturday morning that Charles Bryant was in town.

The Capture

          He shadowed him during the day and when he went to bed at about four p.m. in the hotel, Short removed his shoes and slipped up to the door with a companion.  When he opened the door, Bryant was watching.  He was evidently expecting trouble for his revolver lay on one side and his trusty Winchester on the other.  Short covered him with his gun and then called him by name.  Bryant reached for his revolver.  Short told him that he had a bead on him and if he moved he was a goner.  That settled it.  With death staring him in the face he submitted to being handcuffed.  Several times during Sunday morning, attempts were made to release the prisoner.  About noon the parties attempting the rescue disappeared and were reported to have ridden horseback north to the Strip.  Short fearing trouble, determined to take his prisoner at once to Wichita without waiting to notify Marshal Grimes of the capture.

Short Starts For Wichita

          Accordingly when the passenger train started north about five o’clock Sunday evening he was on board with his prisoner.  Although his friends warned him that attempts would be made by the Daltons to rescue Bryant on the way through the Strip, he persisted in taking his man.  Help was offered, but refused.  After the train started fro Hennessey Short obtained permission to take his prisoner into the baggage car, assigning as his reason that he expected trouble and wanted to protect the passengers from a fight in their midst.  He placed Bryant in the baggage car and gave the baggage man his revolver to guard the prisoner while he would stand on the platform on the trip through the Strip.  Accordingly he took his stand on the front platform of the smoking car leaving Conductor James Collins and the passenger in the forward car.  The baggage man got thirsty and laying the revolver in a pigeon hole, he went into the section occupied by the mail clerk to get a drink.

The Melee Begins

          Almost as soon as he left the desperate man sprang forward seized the revolver in his manacled hands and cocking it commanded Collins to jump.  Bryant then returned to his place behind the door.  He opened it and saw Short watching.  He closed the door, cocked his revolver again and opened the door, fired at Short.  This ball began the ball and before it closed Short had sent three bullets toward Bryant, and the latter had fired five shots.  Short received a mortal wound in the left breast.  Realizing that his end was near and desiring to do his full duty, he lunged forward and grabbed Bryant by the foot.  Bryant had by this time also fallen and hung grasping the handle on the end of the car.  Short, thinking that his man was escaping tightened his grip and called for help.  Collins came to him, and just as he was dying he said, “I got my man, but he got me too.  I would like to see my mother.”  Then the brave man passed away.  The bodies were taken to Caldwell.  Marshal Grimes telegraphed as soon as he heard of the affair, t the Mayor of Caldwell to take good care of the bodies.  He went up Monday and saw the remains of Short shipped to his mother in Indiana.  Marshal Grimes deserves great praises for the way in which he has acted.  All the bills, for embalming, casket, etc., he paid for, although there is not the least likelihood of his ever being compensated.

The Dead Bandit

          Charles Bryant was born and grew up in Texas.  His parents were respectable and well to do people.  Prior to the opening of Oklahoma, he was engaged as a cattle herder and for a number of years has been considered a bad man.  He took a claim in Payne County, but only remained on it a few weeks, when he sold it.  Among his other accomplishments he was considered a veteran horse thief.   Bryant was suspected of participation in a train robbery in Arizona in 1888.  In fact he was an all round tough citizen.  It is supposed that he joined the Dalton gang at Mulhall, Oklahoma some time in May.  Another person who it is claimed belongs to the Daltons is Charles Bailey, who is now in jail at Guthrie for selling whiskey to the Creek Indians.  About the first of May, the ‘Daltons were in Kingfisher and went from here to Mulhall where they met Bailey and Bryant, soon after the Wharton junction robbery occurred.  The mother of the Dalton boys lives about two miles and a half north of Kingfisher on a school section, which she has leased.

Ed Short’s Career

          Ed Short was born in Indiana.  He lived in that state until he was about seventeen years of age, when he came west and settled for a short time at Emporia, Kansas.  Then he secured a job as herder near Hunnewell and from than time soon developed the tastes and daring reckless traits of cowboy life.

          When the Stevens County troubles arose in western Kansas, Short became interested in the town of Woodsdale and was an able ally of Sam Wood.  During all that period of hot excitement he was foremost in the defense of his own town and in doing everything to advance its interests.  When the Oklahoma country opened Ed settled at Hennessey and has claimed that as his home ever since.  In the fall of 1890.

 

Shrigley, William E. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Shriver       

R.

M. J.

D.U.S. Marshal

March 13, 1905

 

Shuey, Thomas was commissioned on June 18, 1889, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Shuster, Marion was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Sigemore, David was killed on July 31, 1890. 

(Oklahombres) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)    Killed in the line of duty.

 

Silcott, Walter D. was commissioned in Oklahoma Territory on March 22, 1905, by Marshal W. D. Fossett. 

(File #10, at Indian Library at the Oklahoma City Archives)

 

Simmons, John was commissioned in April of 1895, serving under Marshal Evett Nix, assigned to Guthrie, Oklahoma Territory.  Simmon’s commission was called by Marshal Evett Nix after September 30, 1895. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Simmons, James A. was commissioned in Oklahoma Territory on March 22, 1905, by Marshal W. D. Fossett. 

(File #10, Indian Library at Oklahoma City, Archives)

 

Simpson, Hugh was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Picture - Muskogee Genealogical Society) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Simpson, John was commissioned on August 9, 1893, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George Crump.  Simpson was commissioned again on July 7, 1896, when he lived in Krebs, Indian Territory.  He was remembered as a deputy marshal in Indian Pioneer History interview with William Taylor, a Choctaw resident. 

(Indian Pioneer History - William Taylor)  (Black Red And Deadly) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Simpson L. S. served in the Northern Judicial District in 1894. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Simpson, Robert J. was commissioned on September 6, 1869, in the District Court at Van Buren, Arkansas, serving under Marshal William A. Britton.  Deputy Marshal Simpson lived in Little River County, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Simpson, W. C. was commissioned on June 21, 1889, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes.  In December and January of 1889 and 1890, Simpson made several arrest of persons introducing and selling spirits in Indian Territory.  One of those arrested was a whiskey peddler named “White Feather”. 

(Ft. Smith Elevator - August 30, 1889) (Atoka Indian Citizen - December 21, 1889 & January 18, 1890) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Singleton, L. H. was commissioned on May 7, 1895, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal  

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Sisemore   

Solomon

D.U.S. Marshal

July 3, 1906 to June 30, 1907

 

Sisney, Porter H. was commissioned in Oklahoma Territory on March 22, 1905, serving under Marshal W. D. Fossett. 

(File #10, Indian Library at the Oklahoma City Archives)

 

Sisson, Ned E. was commissioned in Oklahoma Territory at Guthrie, Oklahoma under Marshal Canada “Harry” Thompson.  He worked a case where two Seminole Indians were tortured, chained to a tree, then burned.  In 1898, A mob thought these two men killed a woman named Mary Leard.  They were put to death while the real murder was on the loose.  Deputy Marshals Bill Tilghman, Heck Thomas, Bill Fossett and Ned Sisson were chosen to make arrests within the mob that committed the heinous deed.  The real murderer was arrested but released due to insufficient evidence.  In September of 1898, Deputy Marshal Sisson took the night train from Newkirk to Guthrie to transport prisoner, William L. Hagan who was charged with passing counterfeit money.  Sisson’s order was to take the prisoner to Norman to stand trial.  The prisoner escaped from his guard by mingling with the crowd as they waited at the train station.  He retired as office deputy in February of 1902, to become clerk of the 5th Judicial Court under Judge McAtee. 

(The Enid Weekly Sun - April 13, 1899) (Marietta Monitor - September 23, 1898) (The Cleo Chieftain - February 20, 1902) (Shoot from the Lip)

 

Sisson   

Ned

E.

 D.U.S. Marshal

Guthrie

April 4, 1898

 

Sixkiller, Samuel was captain of the Indian police at Union Agency and was commissioned as deputy marshal in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  Liquor was a real problem in Indian Territory.  Sam’s men destroyed over five thousand gallons of whiskey in one month.  The first man that Sam had to kill was a whiskey peddler who was driving a wagon full of liquor to Muskogee.  The peddler, Solomon Copple of Missouri, went for his shotgun but was outdrawn by the faster, Sam Sixkiller.  In June of 1885, William Cobb and Alex Cowan were on the way to the post office at Gibson Station  when a party of rustlers led by notorious outlaw, Dick Glass accosted them, demanding they halt or be killed.  Fearing for their lives, they went for their weapons forcing a gun battle, which left three of the rustler dead and Cobb and Cowan seriously wounded.  Feeling their victims would soon die, the gang rode away.  Six Killer and officer Fields were notified at Fort Gibson to come to the scene of the shooting where they found both of the victims still alive.  William Cobb died a few days later from his wounds, while Cowan recovered.  Sam trailed Dick Glass and Jim Johnson five miles south of Emit, where he killed Glass.  Dan Lucky, one of the rustlers was captured and tried in the Cherokee court for William Cowan’s death.  He was found guilty and sentenced to death but Principal Chief Bushyhead reprieved him of the sentence.  On December 24, 1886, Sam Sixkiller was killed at Muskogee by Dick Vann and his brother-in-law Alf Cunningham, two Cherokee mixed-bloods.   Sam climbed the stairs on a platform, on the north side of the Patterson mercantile store when the two outlaws rode up, calling to Sixkiller.  Just as Sam turned around to greet his unexpected visitors he was met with a blast from a double barrel shotgun.  The lawman fell from the platform to the ground below.  Seriously wounded but not yet ready to die, Sam went for his six-shooter only to be greeted by Alf Cunningham’s revolver.  Cunningham fired several rounds into Sixkiller as he lay on the ground.  Sam managed to get to his feet as he was awaiting death to take him.  In a confused state, Sam Sixkiller ran in a circle several times.  And then dropped to the ground dead. The two killers were able to evade the law for a short period of time.   In 1885, Dick Vann was killed in a shoot-out with Deputy Marshal Jackson Ellis.   Alf Cunningham was captured by the deputy marshals and taken to the Ft. Smith court where he was turned over to the Creek Nation who allowed him to escape.  The fugitive was again recaptured in the Cherokee Nation and turned over to the Creek Lighthorsemen where he was allowed to escape again.   Cunningham was never tried for his part in the murder of Deputy Marshal Sam Sixkiller.

(Muskogee - The Indian Journal - November 8, 15, 1879) (The Cherokee Advocate - July 27, 1883) (Indian Champion - July 26, 1884) (Ft. Smith Elevator - December 25, 1885) (Indian Pioneer History - Lafayette Teal) (Indian Pioneer History - Burl Taylor) (Picture - Black Red and Deadly) (Chronicles Of Oklahoma - Volume 50, 1972) (Outlaws and Peace Officer of I. T.)  (Indian Territory And The United States, 1866 - 1906) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

A TERRIBLE TRAGEDY

Capt. Sixkiller, While Unarmed Is Shot Down on Our Streets

 

December 29, 1886—Indian JournalThursday’s and Friday’s races here brought a miscellaneous crowd to our town, and the numerous Christmas bottles rapidly filled a good number of the crowd full to overflowing.  So much drinking was going on that many would not go out to the grounds and everyone was confident that at least one tragedy would be enacted here during the holidays, but no one imagined that Muskogee was to loose a good citizen and the Territory one of the bravest of officers. 

          The chain of circumstance leading to the killing of Captain Sixkiller is as follows:

          About 4 o’clock Friday afternoon Alf Cunningham, while drunk, “threw down” on Tom Kennard, a Creek Lighthorseman, in the door of the Commercial Hotel, but did not shoot, though a minute afterwards he would have done so had not Mrs. Renfro, who standing beside him, succeeded in getting his pistol.  As he came down the steps of the hotel Kennard met him and dealt him a blow over the head with his six-shooter.  This enraged Alf and he was determined on revenge.  About 4:30 he found Dick Vann, his brother in-law, who was ready to help him in any emergency.  Both were unarmed and went to Turner & Byrne’s store purchase a pistol, but looking for trouble, C. W. Turner refused to sell him one.  On failing there both went to the Mitchell House and finding the city marshal Shelly Keys there, before he suspected their intentions they had him down and disarmed and it is thought would have killed him there had it not been for the crowd, as he is under their displeasure.  Finding Al Farmer’s shotgun they took possession of it notwithstanding Farmer’s remonstrance, and they were then armed and prepared for any deed.

          Up to this time it is presumed they had not thought of Sixkiller, but as they came up the street half crazed with liquor they were ready for the first person against whom they had a grudge, and Tom Kennard in particular.  At the steps leading down from Turner & Byrne’s porch they met Capt. Sixkiller, who was entirely unarmed.  To make sure of their man in the darkness one called “Sam!” and on hearing his name the Captain stepped towards them and about four feet from the corner of the porch.  Dick was heard to say in the half crying voice he uses when mad “You’ll never do that to me again,” or words to that effect, when the shotgun in the hands of Alf was leveled at the Captain, who must have knocked it aside as the charge of fine shot it contained partly passed through his clothing and lodged in the gate of the lumber yard.  At the same instant Dick, who was positively identified by an eyewitness, fired in rapid succession four shots into Sixkiller, who staggered and fell on his hands and knees on the steps, when to make sure of his work Vann fired another shot into the body.  A few heavy groans and all was over, the deed was done.  The two men then ran half leisurely down Main street, turned the corner and passed the billiard hall and on out of town.  Saturday night it was reported they attempted to lodge with John Lowrey, who objected, and in flourishing a pistol Dick’s weapon was discharged, the ball going across the base of his thumb.

          Saturday morning writs, were sworn out before Commissioner Tufts and placed in the hands of Deputy U. S. Marshals Dalton, Tyson, Campbell and Hayes, and although they made a vigorous search until Sunday morning, and at one time were within a half-mile of Dick and his companion, they did not succeed in finding them.  Martin and Luke Sixkiller, brothers of Sam, Policemen Fields Laftore and Maj. Hodges were also here Saturday, but in the absence of orders did not join in the pursuit.  On Monday evening Agent Owen returned from the Cherokee Nation, and at present writing is making preparations for an active hunt for them.  Parties reported them in the thick bottoms of Gooseneck Bend, about ten miles east of town, the locality in which Vann did the scouting a couple of years ago when wanted for assault on Captain Hammer.

          The funeral of Captain Sixkiller took place Sunday morning at 11 o’clock from the M. E. church and was conducted by Cherokee lodge A. F. and A. M., of Tahlequah.  The church could not contain the friends who gathered from nearly every part of the eastern portion of the Territory to attend the last rites.

          Among those present from Tahlequah were Wm. Ballarn, Waite Foreman, J. L. Adair Sr., J. L. Adair, Jr., T. R. Sixkiller, J. L. Stapler, H. C. Barnes, D. W. Wilson and others, from Choteau were G. H. Lewis and Butler Bros.; from Eufaula, Chief Perryman and wife, Dr. Leo Bennett and wife, Sam Grayson, Charles Gibson, and Roley McIntosh; from Savanna, Dr. E. Poe Harris; from Ft. Gibson, F. H. Nash, Colonel Rogers, Tom French, Mr. Doty, Wm. P. Ross, George Saunders, Wm. Scot and Mr. Pick.

          The procession, which followed the remains to the grave was one of the largest every gathered together in this section of the country.

          Captain Sixkiller was born in Going-Snake District, Cherokee Nation, in the year 1842, making him forty-four years of age at the time of this death.  He was raised in the Cherokee Nation, educated at the old Baptist Mission, Mr. Evan Jones being his teacher.  At the breaking out of the war his father joined the Northern army leaving Sam to take care of the property.  A number of his neighbors proceeding to join the Southern army took him with them, and he enlisted with them under General Waite, serving one year.  At the end of that time he went to Fort Gibson and joined a Federal artillery company, of which her father Redbird Sixkiller, was first lieutenant.  He was married at Gibson December 23, 1865, to Miss Fannie Foreman, and moved to Tahlequah, where he lived on a farm until he was appointed High Sheriff.  After serving in that capacity for three years, while he and his deputies were attempting to arrest Jeter Thompson the latter was killed.  For this he was tried and exonerated.  In 1879 he moved to this place on being made Captain of the U. S. Indian Police of the five tribes.  About three yeas ago while trying to arrest a whiskey peddler near Eufaula the man resisted and was killed by the Captain and his brother Henry in self-defense; and also about a year and half ago he killed Dick Glass while attempting his capture.  At the time of his murder he was U. S. Deputy Marshal, and was a valued member of the secret service of the Missouri Pacific.  The Captain has done probably more than any one person to free the railroad towns of this Territory of their dangerous and reckless elements, and to him the country owes in a great degree the comparative security to life and property that it now enjoys.

 

Sizemore, David was commissioned on August 20, 1889, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  While serving with the Indian police at Deep Fork Creek, he tried to arrest Harker, an Euchee Indian who had numerous charges, including murder.  Sizemore was shot down and while lying prostrate his assassin shot his body full of holes and made his escape.  David Sizemore was buried in Okmulgee. 

(Indian Chieftain, Vinita - August 7, 1890) (Ft. Smith Elevator - August 8, 1890) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)   Killed in the line of duty.

 

Sizemore, Solomon was commissioned in the Northern District of Indian Territory, serving under Marshal W. H. Darrough. 

(File #10, Indian Library, Oklahoma Historical Library)

 

Skaggs, Willis G. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.

 (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Skelley 

John

D.U.S. Marshal

Mineral

November 19, 1907

 

Slassamon, was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Slosson, J. N. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Slusher, James N. was commissioned on August 5, 1889, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Slusher, Simeon was commissioned on June 21, 1889, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Smart, Sam was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Smartt    

L.

P.

D.U.S. Marshal

April 2, 1905

 

Smirl, G E. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Smith, was commissioned in the District Court at Van Buren, serving before a marshal and deputy marshals were assigned to Indian Territory in March of 1851.   Around 1846, the Starr gang headquarters at Younger’s Bend on the Canadian River in the Cherokee Nation where they ran stolen horses to Texas and there stole horses bringing them back to the Cherokee Nation.  When the gang tried to operate in the Chickasaw-Choctaw Nation along the Texas Road from Boggy Depot to Fort Washita the military became involved.  In October of 1847, Mat Geurring broke into a home of a free mulatto and mixed-Cherokee blood people at Fort Gibson and kidnapped two girls.  In the presence of the girls’ mother the girls were tied and carried off to the states.  Deputy Marshal Latta was called to try to arrest the gang and arrested Tom Starr in Evansville, Arkansas, wanted on a murder charge for killing an old Negro man in Crawford County, Arkansas.  He was held until 1848, when Michael Doolin and he made their escape.  Deputy Marshals Latta and Smith were summoned from Van Buren, Arkansas to serve warrants of arrest for the Starr gang and Mat Guerrin in the Flint District in June of 1848.  During the attempted arrest, Mat Guerrin, Ellis Starr and Washington Starr were killed. 

(Cherokee Advocate - October 7, 1847; May 29, June 5, June 12, July 3, 1848) (The Five Civilized Tribes)

 

Smith assisted Deputy Marshall Jim Pettigrew in the arrest of Tom Root on November 13, 1894.  Root was wanted for robbery of the Blackstone train. 

(Hell on the Border) (Black Red and Deadly) (Hell on the Border-Harman)

 

Smith was killed by a man named Tubby Frazier who was arrested by Smith and was being transported to Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  After killing Smith, Frazier escaped.  Smith arrested eight men in the Choctaw and Chickasaw Nations in May of 1880, who were charged with introducing liquor into Indian Territory and larceny.

(The Atoka Independent - July 12, 1878) (Muskogee - The Indian Journal - June 2, 1880)

 

Smith, A. C. was commissioned on February 16, 1894, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George J. Crump.  Deputy Marshal Smith lived in Gravelly Hills, Arkansas when commissioned. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Smith, Andrew Jackson “Andy” was commissioned on August 11, 1885, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas working in the Creek and Cherokee Nations in 1885.  In March of 1886, he brought in ten prisoners from Indian Territory to the federal jail in Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  In April of 1888, Andy was working near Fleetwood when he returned to camp to find his prisoner, Big Chew, a large Cherokee Indian, had killed Officer Henry Miller with an axe.  He was stationed in Vinita, Cherokee Nation, in 1898, working under Deputy Marshal Jim Wilkerson.  He lived ten miles southeast of Vinita and was still alive in 1930. (Ft. Smith Elevator - April 16, 1886) (Indian Pioneer History - W. F. Jones) (Indian Pioneer History - Cleracy (Fields) (Experiences of A U.S. Deputy Marshall) (Black Red And Deadly) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Smith, A. R. was a deputy marshal working in the Northern District of Texas.  Smith and Joe Phillips, two prominent citizens of Gainesville, Texas, became involved in an argument over a lumber bill.  Their argument turned into a gun battle where both men were killed.  

(The Territorial Topic - December 19, 1899)   Killed in the line of duty.

 

Smith, Benjamin, Franklin. “Bill”, “Fatty”   “Bill” Smith was one of the deputy marshals that was summoned to take part in the capture of Ned Christie on November 2nd and 3rd, near Tahlequah, Cherokee Nation.  In 1897, Deputy Marshal Smith was sworn into the Northern District Muskogee Court.  Smith was a part of the traveling court which was formed to shorten the travel distance between Indian Territory and Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  He also worked with Judge Abraham Jefferson Seay who was an associate Justice and later became the second Governor of Oklahoma.  The court consisted of twenty seven people and held it first term in Beaver.  Along the way the members of the court feasted on deer, wild turkey, prairie chicken and an eight pound bass which Deputy Marshal Smith shot in a pond near Woodward.  Judge Seay was a large man standing over six foot tall and had a problem with excessive weight but he couldn’t compare to Bill Fatty Smith, who stood over six foot and weighed three hundred-sixty pounds.  During Bill Smith’s later days as deputy marshal he served as field deputy marshal in the Southern District Indian Territory at Paris, Texas.

(The Cleo Chieftain) (Indian Pioneer History - Nathan Reed “Texas Jack”) (Indian Pioneer History - C. B. Rhodes) (Pictured in 1880 - 1890 - Heck Thomas) (Picture - Guardian of the Law) (Picture - Experience of A U.S. Deputy Marshal) (Justice For All) (Picture - Notable Men of Indian Territory) (Black Red and Deadly) (Outlaws and Peace Officers of I. T.) (Picture - Hell on the Border-Harman) (Picture - Iron Men)

 

Smith      

Benjamin

Franklin

Fatty

D.U.S. Marshal

Ryan

2/19/1906--1907

 

Smith, C. E. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  He was a part of the posse that killed Bob Rogers on March 13, 1896. 

(Hell on the Border) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Smith, C. P. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  The Territorial Topic newspaper reported that Charley P. Smith left Purcell to go to Comanche country to look for evil doers.  In December of 1889, Charley and W. T. Ansley took charge of six men that had been arrested by the Indian Police in Greer County for cutting timber on government land.  C. P. Smith was living in Oceano, California in 1930.   (Experiences Of A U.S. Deputy Marshall) (Indian Pioneer History - W.F. Jones)  (The Territorial Topic - December 26, 1889)

 

Smith, Famous rode with Deputy Marshal T. J. Ernest, in September of 1897.  The officers tried to serve a warrant of arrest to Dave Vaugh, the noted Texas desperado who terrorized the Illinois and the Sequoyah Districts for several months.  The deputy marshals met Vaugh near Ft. Gibson where the outlaw became involved in a shootout with the marshal’s force, which left the outlaw dead.  The Cherokee Advocate reported that Famous Smith, a Cherokee Indian, was tried for the murder of J. J. Gentry whom he supposedly killed around 1884, near Webber Falls.  Gentry borrowed a horse from Smith and nearly killed the animal by hard riding.  He tried to borrow another horse which Smith refused.  During a trip to Webber Falls, the two men got into a heated argument and Gentry pulled his gun firing at Smith.  The bullet tore through Smith’s sleeve without causing any injury, but Smith caught up in the moment, returned fire killing Gentry.  The murder was reported to the officials at Webber Falls by Smith but nothing happened for nine years.  In June of 1893, the trial was held in Ft. Smith, Arkansas, where Smith was convicted of murder and sentenced to hang.  A new trial was granted by the Supreme Court which dismissed all charges. 

(The Cherokee Advocate - June 10, 1893) (The Weekly Elevator - June 16, 1893) (Marietta Monitor - September 17, 1897) (Hell on the Border - Harman)

 

Smith, Frank was commissioned on March 22, 1886, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal John Carroll.  Smith later became sheriff of Caddo County.  On January 15, 1902, Frank Smith and his deputy, George Beck, were killed by the Casey Gang eight miles west of Anadarko.  Frank was shot through the chest, leaving him fatally wounded, dying within a few minutes.  George Beck was also shot in the chest and his left arm was shattered, killing him instantly.  The lawmen’s killers approached their victims robbing them of their possessions.  The posse trailed the murderers in the snow where they eventually overcame the outlaws.  One of the outlaws, Swofford, was killed and two others, Sam Casey, and Bill Wilson were captured near Wewoka, Indian Territory. The gang, made up of a number of notorious outlaws, were wanted for horse stealing.   Prior to being sheriff at Caddo, Frank was sheriff of Cleveland County.  Frank was living in Norman, Oklahoma Territory, at the time of his death.

(The Woodward Bulletin - January 31, March 7, 1902)  (The Taloga Advocate - January 30, 1902) (Oklahombres) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Smith 

F.

E.

D.U.S. Marshal

February 14, 1898

 

Smith, George arrested Bill Carr in 1895, on a federal warrant for a minor offense to keep Oklahoma County Sheriff Deford from arresting him.  Carr was wanted for helping the Christian Gang to escape jail.  George was placed over the Norman District in July 15, 1893, Under Marshal Evett Nix and was retained in February of 1896 when Marshal Nix was replaced by Marshal Patrick S. Nagle. 

(West Of Hell’s Fringe) Oklahombres shows a George Smith who was a Territorial Deputy Sheriff killed on May 25, 1901.  (Oklahombres) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Smith 

George 

D.U.S. Marshal

Norman

March 11, 1905

 

Smith, G. M. was appointed as office deputy at South McAlester by Marshal George K. Pritchard of the Central District, in 1904. 

(The Choctaw News - June 2, 1904)

 

Smith, Henry was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  On January 17, 1887, Henry was with Deputy Marshal Phillips, Mark Kuykendall, and William Kelly, transporting Seaborn Kalijah alias “Green” to Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  Phillips set up camp and went to Eufaula on business leaving his officers to guard the prisoners.  When Phillips returned to camp he found Kuykendall and Smith dead, having been killed with an axe.   Kelly’s body was shot and mutilated by an axe.  He was found away from the other two deputy marshal’s bodies.  Smith and Kuykendall’s bodies were dragged to the fire and log embers laid across their legs.  Seaborn Green killed his captors and made his escape. Officer Phillips trailed Seaborn and recaptured him.  Within a few days, two of Seaborns relatives were arrested and property from the camp was found in their possession.  Seaborn confessed to the killings asserting his relatives did not take part in the killings.  Seaborn’s relatives were released and he paid for his crimes on October 7, 1887, when Judge Parker sent him to the gallows. 

(Ft. Smith Elevator - February 4, June 21, 1887) (Hell on the Border-Harman) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)    Killed in the line of duty.

 

Smith, John A.   Biographical Index

The subject of this sketch was born September 12, 1846, at Williamstown, Massachusetts, eldest son of Joseph Smith, of Vermont, a prominent mechanic of that State. John's mother was a Miss Cope. John attended public school until he was seventeen years, after which he went to railroading, and from 1861 to 1867 continued that business, when he went West to the Cherokee Nation, and was appointed deputy marshal under Marshal Roots Sarber. He rode for the first court ever held in Fort Smith, serving during two terms of Marshal Buttons' office. There are at present only two (including Mr. Smith) of the first deputies who survived the perils attached to the commission in those days. In 1874 Mr. Smith gave up his commission and opened a farm in Coowescowee district. In 1888 he opened a grocery business in Chelsea. April 15, 1873, he married Miss Susan Williams, daughter of L. B. Williams, a Cherokee by intermarriage in the Bigbee family. 

Smith, J. C. was commissioned on April 2, 1893, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  Deputy Marshal Smith lived in Milton, Indian Territory when commissioned. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Smith, J. H. was commissioned on September 2, 1872, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Logan S. Roots.  Smith was commissioned again on March 21, 1879, and February 7, 1889, while living in the Choctaw Nation.

 (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Smith, J.  M. was commissioned on November 2, 1895, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  Deputy Marshal Smith lived in Smithville, Choctaw Nation when commissioned.  In January of 1886, Smith brought in Ellie Teehee who was charged with introducing whiskey to Indian Territory.

(Ft. Smith Elevator - January 8, 1886) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Smith, J. W. was commissioned on August 27, 1890, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Smith, James A. B. was commissioned on June 5, 1889, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  Deputy Marshal Smith arrested Robert Adair charged with assault.  Adair was taken to the federal jail in Ft. Smith, Arkansas to stand trial.

(The Weekly Elevator - September 22, 1893) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Smith, James J. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas where he was a special deputy. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Smith, Jeff was commissioned in the Western District of Arkansas.  Jeff was killed February 23, 1888. 

(Oklahombres) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)   K

 

Smith, Jim, ex-deputy marshal was fined $50 and sentenced to 30 days in jail for assault. 

(The Territorial Topic September 5, 1889)

 

Smith 

John

D.U.S. Marshal

Hennessey

March 11, 1905

 

Smith, John L. was over the Hennessey District when Marshal Evett Nix was replaced by Marshal Patrick S. Nagle in February of 1896.  On August 4, 1896, John Smith captured C. E. Lawrence near Enid.  The fugitive escaped with Bill Doolin on July 5, 1896.

(The Enid Weekly Sun - April 21, 1898) (West Of Hell’s Fringe) (Shoot from the Lip) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Smith, Luther was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Smith, “Negro” led a posse to Atoka to serve a warrant of arrest to Billy Shield and his gang.  The gang was involved in committing “Hi-way Robbery.”  Several gangs worked this area, finding it very profitable.  The robbers would lay in wait for travelers to pass. If their prey looked easy they would rob and murder them. Some of the gangs such as the Rufus Buck Gang and the Booley July Gang worked with the motto “Dead Men Tell No Tales.”  Perhaps this accounted for the numerous bodies that were found in the creeks and underbrush in this area.  The Choctaw lighthorsemen gave very little resistance to these groups.  The reason for not doing anything could have been fear of the gang or lack of concern, because most of the gangs’ victims were white intruders.  The marshal’s force made contact with the Shield gang and a gun battle followed, leaving one of the gang members with a bullet hole in the leg.  Shield and the rest of his gang escaped while their wounded companion was taken to Atoka to be locked up in a vacant building.  After several days of waiting the gang came and released the wounded prisoner. 

(Indian Pioneer History - Thomas D. Bell) (Indian Pioneer History - John Ward)                  

 

Smith, Paul rode with Bud Ledbetter, Paul Williams and Ernest Hubbard to stop a race riot at Muskogee.  A group of Negroes known as the United Socialists claimed the United States Government did not have authority over them.  This organization was prevalent in many Indian Territory towns.  As the deputy marshals rode to the home that housed the Socialist group, a woman screamed, “Give it too Bud Ledbetter, remember he kills Niger’s.”  One of the Socialist group cocked his Winchester but Ledbetter was too quick for him.  The fight was on.  When the smoke cleared more than fifty shots were fired.  The Negroes were dead and their bodies riddled with bullets.  None of the deputies were wounded.  Deputy Marshal Smith became involved in an argument with a Negro man named Dave Littles over a woman which ended in a shooting leaving Littles fatally wounded. 

(The Bennington Tribune - April 4, 1907) (Muskogee Weekly Phoenix - April 6, 1905)

 

Smith, Robert was commissioned on October 14, 1886, in the Western District at Ft, Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Smith, Tom C. was commissioned on September 26, 1891.  Tom Smith was killed on November 4, 1892, in the Chickasaw Nation, north of Gainesville near Thackerville.  Tom Smith went to the Santa Fe Railroad train station with Deputy Marshals Booker and Armstrong.  One railroad car on the train was for the colored which was provided by Texas law.  Tom Smith was questioned when he entered the car and asked what he was doing there.  Tom seeing he was not welcomed in the car got up to go to the back of the car.  As he moved to the rear of the car an unidentified colored man shot him in the heart, killing him instantly.  The only reason given for shooting was that he thought he was going to be shot when Tom went to the rear of the train.  Booker and Armstrong came to the aid of Tom Smith pulling their pistols and approaching his assailant.  A brief gunfight left Tom Smith’s killer dead. Two other colored men were arrested and taken to the Ardmore jail.  Tom was a deputy from the Eastern Court of Texas at Paris, Texas.  In November of 1891, Tom worked with U.S. Commissioner Gates to capture James Holloman who was passing gold and silver coins.  The counterfeiter was using Babbitt to make coins having $1,835 in his possession.  In 1891, Tom Smith was in charge of the hired guns that were brought in to stop the Johnson County War in Wyoming.  He recruited known gunmen such as G. R. Tucker, Buck Garrett, Frank Canton and twenty others.  In 1892, these hand picked vigilantes stopped the Wyoming range wars. 

(Black Red and Deadly) (The Western Peace Officer)  (The Territorial Topic - November 12, 1891) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)   K

 

Smith, T. D. was commissioned on August 16, 1893, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George J.  Crump.  Deputy Marshal Smith lived in Jenson, Arkansas when commissioned.  In 1894, He was commissioned in the Central District of Indian Territory when the Attorney General’s office conducted an investigation on the conduct of the marshals and deputy marshals in Indian Territory.  Deputy Marshal Benjamin Hackett was removed from office because he had allowed deputies to release prisoners, be drunk while on duty and allow liquor to be brought into Indian Territory without punishing any of the subordinates.  Deputy Marshal Smith was not included in any of the charges and was retained as deputy marshal.

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Smith, Thomas P. served in the Northern District Indian Territory at Muskogee, in May of 1905. 

(The Antlers News - May 26, 1905)

 

Smith, W. C. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes.  He worked out of the Bartlesville District in 1893.  In February of 1894, he served a warrant of arrest to William Grape for robbing U.S. mail and was arrested at South McAlester.  During the fall of 1894, W. C. Smith met with Bill Cook, leader of the notorious Cook Gang trying to persuade him into giving up his life of crime.  Bill Cook rode in Deputy Marshal W. C. Smith’s posse, helping to arrest outlaw Bill Raidler, in the fall of 1895.   Raidler belonged to the Bill Doolin Gang and was involved in a Rock Island train robbery near Dover, Oklahoma Territory.  The lawmen shared a $2,500 reward for Raidler’s capture, “Dead or Alive”.  In July, 1895, W. C. rode with fellow Deputy Marshals Heck Thomas and Cyrus Longbone near Little Caney Creek north of Bartlesville.  Heck Thomas shot Raidler in the hand which blowed off and severely damaged the fingers.  Bill Raidler pulled his knife and cut off the digits of his fingers instead of dressing his hand to save the fingers.   Deputy Marshals Smith and Tilghman continued to trail Bill Raidler for several days.  Raidler entered a house trying to locate food and shelter where he was spotted.  The two deputy marshals surrounded the house waiting for Raidler to come out.  When Raidler left the house he was greeted with gunfire from the lawmen.  Nine bullets struck the outlaw in the breast and shoulders leaving him in very critical condition.  Raidler was taken to Bartlesville, Osage Nation where he received doctor’s treatment.  Raidler recovered from his wounds but remained a cripple for the rest of his life. On January 8, 1894 W. C went to the home of Bob Roger’s brother-in-law.  Bob was wanted for murder of the town constable at Catoosa where he had cut his throat with a knife.  After that he had formed a gang of four which tried to duplicate the deeds of the Daltons.  Bob Rogers’s brother-in-law went upstairs and brought down gang member, Bob Stiteler who was arrested.  Bob Rogers was able to outmaneuver Smith by hitting him in the head and escaping.   While working as a druggist at Fayetteville, Arkansas, he heard there was a reward of $1,300 for the capture of Cherokee Bill.  He planned the scheme which enabled Ike Rogers and Clint Scales to capture Crawford Goldsby alias “Cherokee Bill.”  Cherokee Bill” was fond of Isaac Rogers’s wife’s niece, a miss Maggie Glass.  Isaac Rogers had been a deputy marshal at one time which made it difficult for “Cherokee Bill” to trust him, especially when Bill had a reward on his head.  Bill trusted very few people and always carried his Winchester when he was around anyone.  Smith invited “Cherokee Bill”, Maggie Glass and Isaac Roger to his home.  They tried to give him whiskey that was doctored with morphine, but he refused to drink it.  After they ate supper, Clint Scales, another deputy marshal played casino with “Cherokee Bill”.   “Cherokee Bill” kept his Winchester rifle across his knee, not giving the officers any chance to arrest him.  At 4:00 A.M. everyone decided it was time to go to bed.   Ike Rogers got the privilege of sleeping in the same bed with “Bill”.  The plan was for Ike to grab Bill at an opportune moment trying to hold him until the others could get their handcuffs and on him.  Anytime Rogers moved in the bed, Bill would set upright with his Winchester rifle leveled.  Bill’s girl friend, Maggie Glass was not in on the scheme and became aware what was happening.  Maggie warned “Cherokee Bill” to leave, but he decided he would let Ike Rogers make the first move, then he would kill him.  The next morning Bill was asked to stay for breakfast.   Rogers, Scales and “Cherokee Bill” set in front of the fire place.  Ike Rogers and Scales placed their guns away from them where they could get them in a hurry.  After finishing the morning meal “Cherokee Bill” rolled a cigarette and asked for a light.  After no response, he reached into the open fire to light a stick to fire his cigarette.  Just as he turned his head, Rogers picked up a fire stick striking “Cherokee Bill” in the back of the head.  After a brief struggle, Scales and Rogers were able to put handcuffs on Bill.  He was commissioned out of the Ft. Smith Western District Court and living in Muskogee in 1930. 

(The Weekly Elevator - May 5, September 8, November 17, December 22, 1893) (Ft. Smith Elevator - March 2, 1894) (The Indian Chieftain - October 11, 1894) (Taloga Advocate - September 14, 1895) (Picture - Hell on the Border) (Law West Of Fort Smith) (Shoot from the Lip) (Picture - Outlaws on Horseback) (Indian Pioneer History -  J. W. Brewer) (Indian Pioneer History W.F. Jones) (Indian Pioneer History - John Humberd) (Indian Pioneer History - Burl Taylor) (Hell on the Border - Harman) (Experience of a U.S. Deputy Marshall) (Heck Thomas) (West of Hell's Fringe) (Picture - Conical Of Oklahoma - Summer 1990) (Picture - Muskogee Genealogical Society)

 

Smith, William was commissioned in the Wichita, Kansas Court in 1870, serving under Marshals Dana M. Houston and William S. Tough.  William was born in Leicestershire, England in 1844 and came to America when he was nine years old, settling in Kansas Territory during its opening in 1854.  When he was twenty years of age he enlisted in the Eleventh Regiment, Kansas Volunteer Calvary as a private doing duty in the Indian campaigns in western Kansas and western Dakota Territory.  In September of 1875, the services of Marshal Smith was secured by a colored man who had a prize horse stolen from him by William Lee which was a large iron grey steed worth at least $125.  Lee worked for the colored man’s neighbor who lived near Arkansas City, Kansas and the horse was seen several times in his custody.  Smith and the owner of a local livery station set out to find the horse thief who was suspected to be in Indian Territory and soon were joined by a number of farmers in the neighborhood, armed with shotguns.  Smith went to the Kaw Agency and asked for a squad of Indian policemen from the Kaw tribe to secure the area south of where Lee was thought to be in hiding.  William Lee hid out until daylight when he came out of hiding, going to a house in the neighborhood for breakfast but his meal was cut short when he was arrested and taken to jail by Deputy Marshal Smith.  In 1877 Bill Smith moved to Galena, Indian Territory in the Cherokee Outlet where became one of its first mayors and in 1898 became postmaster.  He died April 25, 1908 from Bright’s disease. 

(Wichita Vidette - November 24; December 29, 1870) (Wichita Weekly Beacon - September 29, 1875) (Galena Evening Times -April 27, 1908) (Why the West Was Wild)

 

Smith, William “Will went to Colorado and brought back Henry Starr and his accomplice “Kid Wilson.”  Henry Starr had been charged with killing Deputy Marshal Floyd Wilson. 

(The Weekly Elevator - March 3, May 5, July 7, August 12, 1893) (Hell on the Border - Harman) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Smith, William C. was commissioned on September 22, 1892, June 25, 1893, and July 1, 1896, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, when he lived in Fayetteville, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Oaths of Office)

 

Smith      

William

C.

D.U.S. Marshal

Fort Gibson

March 11, 1905

 

Smith, William Daly was commissioned on September 10, 1891, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  William Daly was born in 1863 or 1873.   He was buried in the Coleman Cemetery at Daisy, Oklahoma. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Smock, E. J. was commissioned on May 1, 1893, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Smoot, John R. was commissioned on August 26, 1865, serving in the District Court at Van Buren, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Luther C. White. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Snoddy, Erskine W. was assigned to Oklahoma Territory, Alva District on July 15, 1893, serving with Gus Hadwiger and was appointed by Marshal Evett Nix.  During the opening of the Cherokee Strip in 1893, Erskine was in charge of the settlers that came by train to Alva.   In November of 1894, several drunk men from Wintan, Frank Brown, James Brown, J. R. Knight, and Charles Kitchen caught officer Snoddy alone to threatened him.  Their anger, caused by an old grudge started in an argument and led to a drunken gun fight using Winchester rifles. Snoddy was fatally wounded, but before his death he was able to kill Frank Brown and wound the rest of his assassins, who escaped.  He was born on February 4, 1871. 

(The Alva Republican - November 30, 1894) (West Of Hell’s Fringe) (Picture-Oklahombres) (Pioneer Foot Prints Across Woods County) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Snodgrass, F. M. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.

 (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Snodgrass, R, S. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Snodgrass, William C. was commissioned on August 7, 1890, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  In January of 1891, Deputy Marshal Snodgrass brought in Jack Starr from the Cherokee Nation who was charged with Introducing whiskey into Indian Territory. 

(Ft. Smith Elevator - January 2, 1891) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Snow, Duster was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Somerhill, was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Sones, W. F. brought in Price, Bud and Walter Cochran for resisting arrest. in August of 1884, the same trip he arrested three whiskey dealers “Ground Hog”, “Jack Soup” and Jim Taylor.

 (Indian Champion - August 14, 1884)

  

Sorrell, Surrell, John B.  was a deputy marshal assigned to the Atoka court. 

(Indian Pioneer History - Joe Southern)  (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Sorrell, John R. was commissioned on August 16, 1888, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Sorrell, Morris A.  was commissioned on July 22, 1892, in the Western District at Ft. Smith Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Sorrells, George W. was appointed deputy marshal in 1883, working around Eufaula and Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  George was born in 1865, in Gaines Co. Choctaw Nation.  George Sorrells was a white man that lived with the Indians, with no other white neighbors. 

(Indian Pioneer History - George W. Sorrells)

 

Sorrels, Samuel of Kinta, Indian Territory was riding on the Kansas City Southern train with Ralph Seargall and another deputy marshal of Kinta trying to capture a Texas desperado.  The outlaw was confronted as the train neared Coal Creek.  A fierce gun battle broke out but to the deputy marshals surprise the advantage was not theirs for they were out numbered.  After the last shot was fired, Deputy Marshals Sorrels and his fellow officer both lay dead while the third deputy, Ralph Seargall was seriously wounded. 

(The Seiling Guide - January 8, 1903)

 

MARSHAL KILLED

And Two Other Seriously Wounded By A Desperate Outlaw

Drew Two Revolvers

While Three Marshall's Tried To Arrest Him And Use Them With Deadly Effect

 

January 3, 1903—McCurtain, I. T.--Three United States deputy marshals, Sam Sorrels, of Kialait, Ralph Scargal of McCurtain, and another whose name has not been learned, were shot by an unknown man who resisted arrest today, it Coal Creek, a small town on the Kansas City Southern Road.  Deputy Sorrell was killed instantly, the other two deputies being seriously wounded.

          While the deputies were attempting to arrest him, he suddenly drew two revolvers and opened fire.  Freeing himself from arrest with the weapons he disappeared across the country and has not been apprehended.

 

 

Sours   

Phil

D.U.S. Marshal

July 1, 1906 to August 20, 1906

 

Southern, Joe was a guard for the Atoka jail. 

(Indian Pioneer History - Joe Southern)

 

Spain, John A. was commissioned on September 19, 1889, in the Western District, at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.   In 1890, John arrested three men named Sunday, Dawas and Weaver for introducing liquor into Indian Territory.  In January of 1891, he served a warrant of arrest to Riley Ratler for charges of introducing and selling liquor in the Indian Nation.  In February of 1893, Deputy Marshal Spain arrested a white man, Jack Staggs on larceny charges at Briartown, Cherokee Nation. 

(Atoka Indian Citizen - April 12, 1890) (Ft. Smith Elevator - January 30, 1891) (The Weekly Elevator - February 10, 1893) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Spangler, was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Spann   

Freeman

D.U.S. Marshal

March 6, 1899; terminated March 22, 1899

 

Spars, Dan from Perry attempted to arrest Bill Doolin but found himself in an embarrassing position.  Spars recognized the outlaw but found himself looking down his gun barrel when he tried to draw on the outlaw.  He was forced to dismount and was handcuffed. 

(Watonga Republican - July 24, 1895)

 

Spaulding    

George 

A.

D.U.S. Marshal

Antlers

May 7, 1898

 

Speaker, John was commissioned on January 4, 1895, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George J. Crump.  Deputy Marshal Speaker lived in Ft. Smith, Arkansas when commissioned. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Spears, Charles was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Speed, Richard, “Dick” was killed at the age of twenty-six in a shoot-out with the Bill Doolin gang.  On September 1, 1893, Dick Speed was shot by Roy Daugherty, alias “Arkansas Tom” at Ingalls.  “Arkansas Tom” positioned himself in the upstairs window of a hotel room where he killed two other officers, Tom Houston, Lafe Shadley and a thirteen year old boy, who was a curious by-stander.   The marshal’s force clearly lost this battle, the “Battle of Ingalls” as it was called.  Arkansas Tom was the only outlaw captured, and Bill Dalton was wounded but rode to safety with Bill Dalton. See the “Battles of Ingalls for more details. Dick Speed served in Oklahoma Territory under Marshal Evett Nix and had previously served as city marshal in Perkins. 

(The Eagle Gazette - January 19, 1894) (Indian Pioneer History - Orrington “Red Lucas) (Selden Lindsey) (Bill Tilghman) (West Of Hell’s Fringe) (Purple Sage) (Shoot from the Lip) (Ghost Town -Tales Of Oklahoma) (Outlaws on Horseback) (The Marshals Monitor - Microsoft Internet Explorer) (Oklahombres) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)    Killed in the line of duty.

 

Speer, Robert C. was commissioned in Oklahoma Territory in April of 1895, serving under Marshal Evett Nix, assigned to Pawnee. Speer’s commission was called by Marshal Evett Nix after September 30, 1895.

 (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Spencer, James T. was commissioned on January 11, 1885, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Spencer, John was commissioned in the Western District of Arkansas at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Thomas Boles.  Around 1882, Bud Stephens and his young wife of sixteen years, moved to the Arbuckle mountains in the Chickasaw Nation to avoid the officers in Texas.  Stephens, a known horse thief did not take long to make new acquaintances of his caliber.  Two Negroes, Henry Loftus and Martin “Bully” Joseph quickly became friends, wanting him to assist them in stealing some horses that were near by.  As the horses were herded into a corral, Stephen’s attention was directed toward roping a horse when Loftus shot him from the backside.  Bully Joseph made his way back to the Stephens home, telling the young wife how her husband had been seriously injured and he asked that she be with him.  Climbing on Joseph’s horse, riding double, the trip was made to the top of a mountain where Loftus was waiting.  It was here that the two fiends assaulting the young girl.  When they had finished with their victim, and as she sat up crying with her apron covering her face, she was shot by both of the devils.  Near-by at the top of a mountain, the girl and her saddlebags which stored her clothes, were thrown into a narrow cave which protruded downward.  The story of the dastardly deeds was told by a drunken Loftus to his brother who angered Bully Joseph causing him to kill Loftus.  William Loftus reported the crimes to “The Big Frenchman” Deputy Marshal Mershon who told Marshal Boles that Stephens had volunteered to be lowered by rope into the cave to gather the bones of the girl.   The bones were needed before her death could be vindicated.  As he was lowered into the cave, the sound of rattlesnakes could be heard, letting him know he was in a snakes den.  With guts and raw courage the girls bones were retrieved, sending Martin “Bully” Joseph to Judge Parker’s gallows on June 29, 1883.

(Law West Of Fort Smith) (Bill Doolin O. T.) (Black, Red and Deadly) (Hell on the Border-Harman) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Spinkle, Tom was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Spivey, William was commissioned in the Western District of Arkansas at Ft. Smith, by Marshal John N. Sarber.  He was summoned to arrest a horse thief and murderer near the Red River on August 6, 1874.   James Moore was riding with an accomplice named Hunton when the two dangerous outlaws robbed a crippled farmer named Cox who lived in Washington County near Ft. Wayne.  As the outlaws departed from Cox’s home they took two of his horses and traveled a route that took them by Fort Gibson, Eufaula, and Atoka.  When they passed by the Little Blue River they were confronted by Spivey and his posse.  James Moore knew that death awaited him at Ft. Smith if he was captured so he decided to try to shoot his way out of the situation.  The confrontation occurred during darkness which made it difficult to contain the outlaws as they dismounted from their horses using the darkness to make their escape.  The marshal’s pursuit in the running gunfight that developed proved to be fatal as Spivey was killed when James Moore fired the fatal shot that struck him in the head.  Becoming disoriented, Hunton lost his sense of direction, traveling back in the direction that he came where the posse arrested him, returning him to Washington County where he was tried for horse stealing.  He was later taken to Ft. Smith, Arkansas, where his sentence at was reduced for giving information against James Moore.  He escaped from the Ft. Smith jail and made his way back to Indian Territory where he was killed by officers when they tried to capture him.  On September 10, 1874, James Moore was captured by deputy marshals one mile east of Fort Gibson.  He was taken to Ft. Smith, Arkansas, where he was convicted and sent to the gallows on September 3, 1875.  James Moore bragged of killing eight white men, stating that Indians and Nigers didn’t count.  He was not remorseful for Spiveys death.

(Hell on the Border-Harman) (Law West of Fort Smith)(Outlaws on Horseback) (Iron Men) (Oklahombres) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)    Killed in the line of duty.

 

Sponsler, J. L. of Muskogee was appointed by Marshal Leo E. Bennett in November of 1903, as deputy clerk over Western District of Indian Territory, in charge of the office at Wagoner. 

(The Seiling Guide - December 3, 1903)

 

Spradling, John S. was commissioned on August 16, 1872, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Logan S. Roots.  Deputy Marshal Spradling lived in Greenwood, Arkansas when commissioned. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Spring, B. J. was appointed as deputy marshal in 1904 by Marshal George K. Pritchard of the Central District.  Deputy Marshal Spring was stationed at McCurtain County.

 (Woodward Bulletin - April 1, 1904) (The Choctaw News - June 2, 1904) (U.S. Deputy Marshals I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Springer, W. M. was commissioned in the Northern Judicial District on November 4, 1895. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Springfield, W. H. served in the Central District in 1895. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Sprinkel, Tom was commissioned on October 21, 1891, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.

 (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office)

 

Spurgeon, John was remembered by Frank Goodwin in Indian Pioneer History.  Frank and his father were riding along the trail when they overtook the deputy marshal.  The older Goodwin invited the officer to ride in their buggy with them which he agreed.  Along the way the deputy marshal said he was in search of the notorious outlaw Bill Doolin.  About two miles down the road the three-some met a man on horseback but passed without one word being spoken by either party.  Deputy Marshal Spurgeon identified the man as Bill Doolin but knew it would have been suicide to confront him.

(Indian Pioneer History - Frank G. Goodwin) (Bill Doolin)

 

Stacey, Stacy, Z. R. “Bob was appointed in 1904, as field deputy under Marshal George K. Pritchard of the Central District assigned to Boswell, Choctaw Nation.  Deputy Marshal Stacey arrested George Baker in Matoy, Indian Territory in May of 1905, on charges of carrying a concealed weapon.  Baker was placed in the Atoka jail.  In January of 1906, Frank Walker, Calvin Gordon, and Wiley Jones robbed the Frisco Depot in Boswell.  The trio made their get-a-way only to be trailed by Stacy who captured them.  The prisoners were transported to the Atoka jail where they waited for a grand jury investigation. 

(The Durant Weekly News - May 26, 1905; January 12, February 16, 1906) (The Bennington Tribune - January 11, April 26, 1906) (The Choctaw News - June 2, 1904)

 

Stacey-Stacy

Z.

R.

Bob

D.U.S. Marshal

March 21, 1905

 

Stafford, R. B. was commissioned in the Southern District of Indian Territory at Paris, Texas, in 1894. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Stagg, Edward R. “Ed” worked in the fourth district at Perry in 1893, with Charles Colcord and Bill Tilghman. 

(Charles Francis Colcord) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Stagler, J. S. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes.  On December 4, 1890, he was on his way to Covington with several prisoners and was accidentally shot.

 (Ft. Smith Elevator - December 12, 1890)

 

Stallings  

Duke

D.U.S. Marshal

April 2, 1905

 

Stallings Assumes U. S. Marshal Post

 

June 2, 1933--the Oklahoman--Duke Stallings became United States Marshal Thursday when the resignation of R. B. Quinn, incumbent for the last eight years, became effective.

          Stallings has been the chief deputy for many years.  Although he is a Democrat he has been retained by Republican administrations because of his familiarity with the work.

          Political observers said Stalling's appointment was a temporary one, and expressed belief he would be succeeded by a political appointee about July 1.

 

Stamer, W. T. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Stamper  

Sterling

D.U.S. Marshal

April 2, 1905

 

Stamphill, W. L. was commissioned on June 3, 1893, under Marshall Yoes in the Western District court of Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  In April of 1894, he arrested Dave Leslie and Pink Atiska for introducing liquor into Indian Territory at Keokuk.  The two prisoners, both Indians were taken to federal jail at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  In 1894, Stamphill rode with Rufus Cannon, having a gun battle with a part of the Woodward Gang near Wewoka.  In the shoot-out outlaw Joe Pierce was killed and the rest of the gang placed charges on the two deputies claiming the killing was unjustifiable. Both officers were acquitted in a special grand jury.  Deputy Marshal Stamphill lived in Wewoka, Creek Nation when commissioned in 1893.

 (Ft. Smith Elevator - April 27, 1894) (Black Red and Deadly) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Standards, Sam was commissioned in the Southern District of Indian District Of Indian Territory, at Paris, Texas, assigned to the Ardmore location.  (Indian Pioneer History - Francis A. Stover)

 

Stanfield  

Alan

D. U. S. Marshal

April 19, 1905

 

Five Held In Liquor Raid

 

February 24, 1936--Ada, OK--Five men were arrested at a farm ten miles northwest of here Monday by United States Deputy Marshal Allen Stanfield who seized two 100-gallon stills, 1,500 gallons of mash and 70 gallons of whiskey.

 

Stanfield, Wade was mentioned as a Deputy Marshall in Indian Pioneer History, stationed at Vinita. 

(Indian Pioneer History - William C. Cook) (Indian Pioneer History - Walter and Minnie Maytum)

 

Stanley, Charles R. was commissioned on September 27, 1892, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  Stanley was commissioned in the Central District in 1894. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Stannard  

W.

N.

D.U.S. Marshal

April 1, 1898

 

Stansberry, Joseph R. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Stansberry, Thomas R. was commissioned on October 9, 1890.

 (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office)

 

Starbuck, Seth was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Starman, Tom was remembered as a deputy marshal in Indian Pioneer History by Daniel Starr.

(Indian Pioneer History - Daniel Starr)

 

Starr, Cale was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes.  In June of 1892, he brought in William C. Rogers on charges of murdering Deputy Taylor of the Oklahoma District in the summer of 1891.  The prisoner was taken to the federal jail in Ft. Smith, Arkansas, to await trial.

 (Ft Smith Elevator - June 10, 1892)

 

Statham, Joseph was commissioned on January 5, 1893, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Steadham, Robert B. was commissioned on April 5, 1892, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Steel, I. A. “Ike was commissioned in 1893, to Oklahoma Territory by Marshal Evett Dumas Nix, working the fourth District with Charles Francis Colcord, Ike Steel, George Mouser and Morris Roebecker.   He was one of the deputy marshals that rode from Guthrie to Ingalls, Oklahoma Territory to try to capture the Doolin Gang on September 1, 1893.  See: “The Battle Of Ingall’s” for more information.  In February 1896, he was assigned to the Perry District when Marshal Patrick S. Nagle replaced Marshal Evett Nix. 

(West of Hell’s Fringe) (Shoot from the Lip) (Charles Francis Colcord) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (The Marshals Monitor -Microsoft Internet Explorer)

 

Steel     

I.

A.

Ike

D.U.S. Marshal

Perry

March 11, 1905

 

Steele, Jim worked out of Guthrie and took a part in the “Battle of Ingalls” on September 1, 1893, when deputy marshals from Guthrie and Stillwater tried to capture the Doolin Gang.  Refer: to the “The Battle of Ingalls’ for more information.  In July of 1894, Jim was working with Deputy Marshal Jackson when they entered into a gun battle with outlaws, Clay Davis and Bud Appling.  Appling’s severe wounds forced him to surrender but Davis managed to escape through the heavy underbrush even though he was shot several times. 

(The Kingfisher Times - July 26, 1894) (Shoot from the Lip)

 

Steelman, William D. was commissioned in the Southern District Court of Indian Territory at Paris, Texas, in 1894. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Steer, Harry William Deputy U. S. Marsahal

 

Harry Steer Dies, Reached Age 100

 

December 27, 1967--The Oklahoman--Harry William Steer, 100 died at a local nursing home.  Services will be at 11 a.m. Friday at hunter Funeral Home with burial in Memorial Park Cemetery.

          He was born in London, England, during the reign of Queen Victoria, and came to the United States with an uncle and younger sister in 18981, when he was 14.  After farming in Nebraska he bought a 160-acre homestead near Agra in what is now Lincoln County.  He was a deputy U. S. Marshal at chandler and later was a color sergeant in the Oklahoma National
Guard.  He helped build Lake Overholser with horses and mules.  Steer was a life member of the Knights of Pythias and was a member of the Spiritual Life Science Church.

          Survivors include a son. Col. William Frank.

 

Stennett, was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Stepp, Basil was commissioned in the Northern District of Indian Territory, serving under Marshal W. H. Darrough. 

(File #10, Indian Library, Oklahoma Historical Library)

 

Stepp   

Brasil

D.U.S. Marshal

March 21, 1905

 

Stephens, Burrell S. was commissioned on January 28, 1895, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  Stephens lived in Blaine, Indian Territory when commissioned.  In May of 1890, Deputy Marshal Stephens brought in William Shelton on charges of introducing whiskey into Indian Territory. 

(Ft. Smith Elevator - May 16, 1890) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Stephens, Stevens, Hiram “Hi was commissioned on February 5, 1896, while living in Braggs, Indian Territory.  In 1930 he was living in Claremore, Oklahoma. 

(Experiences of a U.S. Deputy Marshall) (Indian Pioneer History - W. F. Jones) (Indian Pioneer History - William Floyd Davis) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Stephens, John E. was commissioned in the Southern District Court of Indian Territory at Paris, Texas, in 1894. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Stephens, James was commissioned on March 11, 1892, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Stephenson, Cyrus R. was commissioned on May 11, 1871, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, assigned to the Cherokee Nation.  Deputy Marshal Stephenson lived in Ft. Smith, Arkansas when he was commissioned in 1871.  In January of 1879, he arrested a man named Stratton who got into an altercation with a section foreman named Graves and killed him.  Stephenson brought his prisoner to Caddo where he turned him over to Deputy Marshal Columbus Ayres who transported him to the federal court in Ft. Smith to appear before Judge Parker.   In February of 1879, several men from Muskogee engaged in a card game at a local saloon with a stranger, William Elliot alias “Colorado Bill”.  Little did they know of this man’s reputation, if they did they would not have made the mistake of associating with him.  The men growing weary after playing cards for a long period of time and filling their gut with liquor decided to retire to a resting spot on the floor.  One of the locals, Johnny Wood had already made a pallet on the floor as Cooky Brown went to find him a resting spot.  Colorado Bill became peeved at Brown during the card game, having made several insulting remarks toward him.  Cooky Brown did not want to get into a fight with Colorado Bill so he decided to leave the saloon.  Brown set up from the floor and was putting on his shoes when Ross Cunningham put out his arm to grasp him to help him get out of the saloon, sensing he was in harms way.  Colorado Bill walked directly toward Brown, shoving his revolver to Brown’s head and fired.  The ball entered Brown’s skull at the ear.  Bill then shoved Cunningham away from Brown and fired a shot into Brown’s heart and another into his side causing him to fall dead upon Wood’s pallet.  Colorado Bill pushed his pistol into Brown’s face which caused Cunningham to make a remark toward Bill making him turn against him.  Cunningham tried to move away but was shot below the left knee.  Colorado Bill remarked that he had killed many a man better than Cooky Brown.  Woods became the next target for he turned on him making threats and ordered him to get a horse.  He went directly to the telegraph agent who summoned a deputy marshal.  When Woods returned to the saloon he came without a horse.  Colorado Bill left the saloon with a sixteen shot repeating rifle and revolver making his way along the railroad tracks toward the Arkansas River.  After daylight, Deputy Marshal Stephenson formed a posse of men made up of J. B. Moore, Henry Eiffert, N. Blackstone, S. Bennett, and Johnny Woods.  The posse tracked Bill north of the river where they found him asleep in some heavy thickets.  The lawmen crept up on their prey until they were at close range.  Blackson covered Bill with his shotgun as Deputy Marshal Stephenson relieved him of his weapons.  The deputy marshal awoke him making the arrest without any resistance.  He was escorted back to town where a pair of bracelets were custom made for his wrists and chains riveted to his legs.  The officers transported Bill to the Ft. Smith jail where he was tried for his crimes.  Colorado Bill had three previous murder charges in Texas and three in Colorado. 

(Caddo Free Press - January 24, 1879)  (Muskogee - The Indian Journal - February 26, 1879) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Stevens, J. O. (1889 Land Rush Deputy) worked under Marshal William Jones at Guthrie in 1889. 

(Oklahoma Land Rush of 1889)

 

Stevens, S. C. arrested Anderson Rogers for introducing whiskey to Indian Territory.  In November of 1892, Stevens arrested Silas James on charges of introducing whiskey into Indian Territory.  James was taken to the Ft. Smith jail.  Deputy Marshal Stevens worked the Choctaw and Chickasaw Nations. 

(Atoka Indian Citizen - March 29, 1890) (The Weekly Elevator - November 18, 1892) (Indian Pioneer History - J. F. Carpenter)

 

Stewart, A. H. was commissioned on May 29, 1893, in Southern Indian Territory at Paris Texas.  On one occasion Stewart traveled to White Bead Hill, Chickasaw Nation about five miles from Pauls Valley where he stopped at a hotel.  At the hotel Stewart became acquainted with a young man about twenty-five years old who had drifted in about two months earlier.  He took care of the horses and did odd jobs around the hotel.  The young man worked at the hotel for several months before leaving.  A warrant, “dead or alive” was issued for the young man who was wanted for murder.  He moved only a short distance, traveling east of Pauls Valley, working for a man who lived on the river.  Officer Stewart did not want to kill the young man knowing by his actions that a shoot-out was eminent.  Zack Gardner, the owner of a grist mill who had befriended the man, was sent to talk to him to encourage him to give himself up.  The young man refused to turn himself in and would not leave.  His behavior meant he would shoot it out before surrendering.  Early the next morning Deputy Marshal Stewart had no choice but to saddle up and go get his man.  About sunup the deputy marshal found the man sleeping on a cot in the front yard.  He rode up to the rail fence where he slid from his horse, pulled his gun from the holster, and approached the sleeping man.  About twenty feet from the cot, Stewart stepped on a corn cob which alerted the sleeping man.  Officer Stewart ordered the man to give it up but instead the man raised his pistol which was already in his hand and began shooting.  The man coming out of sleep was at a definite disadvantage which caused him to miss the first shot.  In self defense Stewart was forced to shoot which killed the young man instantly. This was the only man Deputy Marshal Stewart ever had to kill while making an arrest. 

(Indian Pioneer History - Lem F. Blevins) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Stewart, ”Charley” Frank served as deputy marshal living at old Cherokee Town on the Washita River north of Wynnewood, Chickasaw Nation.  Charley had a room where prisoners were kept overnight on their way to Ft. Smith, Arkansas.   Iron spikes were driven into the floor which held a metal ring that was used to attach a log shackle, which held the prisoners.

(Indian Pioneer History - Frank Stewart) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Stewart, Thomas, “George” M. worked out of the Western District of Arkansas and Southern District Indian Territory at Paris Texas.  In December of 1889, George took eleven prisoners to trial for a train robbery.  The men were arrested at Ardmore, Berwyn and Oklahoma City.  Nellie Wilson, one of the main witnesses for the accused train robbers, was held over for charges of perjury at the Paris, Texas court.  On February 8, 1890, George arrested a John F. Strickland who had a dispute with December of 1889; George took eleven prisoners to trial for a train robbery.  The men were arrested at Ardmore, Berwyn and Oklahoma City.  Nellie Wilson, one of the main witnesses for the accused train robbers, was held over for charges of perjury at the Paris, Texas court.  On February 8, 1890, George arrested a John F. Strickland who had a dispute with Osavio Rodriquez, a Mexican who lived in the territory for several years.  The dispute arose over the sale of a cow.  It was reported that Strickland’s horse was shot and Strickland fired a shot in retaliation that struck Rodriquez in the heart, killing him instantly.  Officer Stewart made the arrest in Ardmore, Indian Territory.  George Stewart arrested H. Sawyer for stealing his neighbor’s hogs.  Stewart was transported to the federal court in Paris, Texas.  The Hudgins gang which terrorized the Chickasaw Nation in 1890 and 1891 was headed by Bill Hudgins who enlisted seven men in their early twenties to raid and rob stores in the Ardmore area.  Second in command, Alex Davis alias “Old Dad” a one time minister’s son held respect by the gang members as well as the lawmen that were trying to apprehend them.  Their first robbery in September of 1890 was at the Carey store near Chickasaw where store owner William Carey was killed.  Lawmen John Swain, George Stewart and Selden Lindsey were trailing the outlaws after they had robbed the store at Alex, Chickasaw Nation, following them southwest of Purcell where they went south to an area south of Ardmore along Mud Creek where again the outlaws made a raid on several stores taking guns ammunition and supplies.  The store owners stated they had been robbed before by the gang but they returned and paid them for the goods.  Near the mouth of Mill Creek at the Howeth line house they decided to take refuge.  The marshal’s force seeing they were out numbered decided to ask for assistance from Nickel Hill.  List Alberson, Greg Bean and John Thomas were sent which evened the count.  As the lawmen entered the area they were quickly spotted and a challenge was sent to them letting them know they were not feared and that the gang had not plans of leaving.  Early the next morning a battle started which lasted for thirty- six hours before the outlaws decided to give up.  Bill Hudgins was seriously wounded before he was captured and all of the rest of the gang was taken prisoner with the exception of a very seriously wounded Dad Davis who managed to escape. John Swain and he collected the $2000 reward paid for Bill Hudgin, on seventeen cases of horse stealing and one case of robbery.  In November of 1891, George arrested John Bowland who was charged with assault to kill.  He was taken to the federal court in Paris, Texas.  In August of 1898, Stewart was serving in Ardmore when he traveled to Marietta, Chickasaw Nation to arrest Flay Harmon who was charged with assault with intent to kill.  In March of 1902, he notified all hack men running whiskey from Lexington to the Chickasaw Nation, their actions must stop.

(Territorial Topic - December 5, 1889, February 13, 1890 & November 12, 19, 1891; March 10, 1892) (Indian Citizen - May 3, 1890) (Ft. Smith Elevator - February 27, 1891; March 7, 1902) (Marietta Monitor - August 26, 1898) (Selden Lindsay) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Stewart    

George 

M. 

D.U.S. Marshal

January 29, 1898

 

Stewart, W. C. was commissioned on October 10, 1891, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Stewart, William N. was commissioned on August 5, 1889, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  Will traveled to Missouri to arrest C. C. Tyree who was wanted for bigamy.  In April of 1890, he also arrested Jim Tanner for introducing whiskey to Indian Territory.  In May of 1890, he served a warrant of arrest to George Starr on charges of larceny.  In July of 1890, he traveled to the Chickasaw Nation to arrest Ose Jones and Ben Haney, charged with horse theft.  Both men were taken to the Paris federal jail to await trial.  In April of 1893, Stewart traveled to Pinckneyville, Illinois to arrest Sherman Wilkerson on larceny charges.  Wilkerson was taken to the Ft. Smith, jail. 

(Atoka Indian Citizen - Jan 18, April 12, 1890) (Ft. Smith Elevator - May 16, July 25, 1890) (The Weekly Elevator - May 19, 1893) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Stickler, Ben was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Stillwell, Jack was commissioned in Oklahoma Territory in 1889.  He worked land claims in the 1889 Oklahoma Land Rush at El Reno serving under Marshal William C. Jones at Fort Reno and Darlington.  William Jones had previously served in the District Court at Wichita, Kansas from August 5, 1885 to May 17, 1889.  After the land rush Jack continued to work his commission under Marshal W. C. Grimes of Oklahoma Territory.  Stillwell was with Forsyth at the famous Beecher’s Island fight in Colorado in 1868. He also served as a scout at Ft. Reno when Chris Madsen was Regimental Quartermaster, Master Sergeant of the 5th Calvary, from 1887 to 1889, when he became Chief Deputy U.S. deputy marshal. 

(Indian Pioneer History - George Alexander Lambe) (Oklahoma Land Rush In 1889) (Memories of Chris Madsen) (Deputy Marshal File #10 in the Indian Library at Oklahoma City)

 

Stockton, Arch M. was commissioned on June 2, 1893, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  He served as court bailiff for Judge Parker’s court.  Arch was serving in Judge Parker’s court on February 27, 1895, when Crawford Goldsby, alias “Cherokee Bill,” was sentenced to death.  When “Cherokee Bill’s” shackles were removed he made a study of the court room looking for any possible way to escape for he knew that death awaited him.  One thing Bill saw that changed his mind of attempting to escape was a glance of Bailiff Stockton who stood behind him with a billy-club ready to drive him to the floor if he made any move. 

(The Weekly Elevator - December 22, 1893) (Hell on the Border-Harman) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Stockton, Ed was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  Ed was killed in 1888 or 1897.

 (Oklahombres) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)  Killed in the line of duty.

 

Stockton, F. Carter was commissioned on January 7, 1895, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  Stockton lived in Wilburton, and normally worked in the Choctaw Nation.  In August, 1895, a cattle man named Squire Riddle went to Ft. Smith, Arkansas, to get $3000 to make a cattle deal.  Riddle’s son-in-law, Bob Hall, was the go between man to purchase the cattle.  Little did Riddle know that his son-in-law was involved in a scam with the Christian gang.  Hall took the money back to Squire Riddle telling him the money had to be hidden for he didn’t want to be responsible for it.  The money was separated where part of it was placed into a trunk and the rest of it in a mattress.  That very evening the Christian gang came to Riddle’s home, stealing the hidden money.  The marshals were summoned to capture the gang who had robbed the prominent Riddle.  Bob Hall hated one of the deputy marshals with a passion, Carter Stockton and wanted him killed.  Hall derived a plan telling Stockton where the Christian gang was hiding, hoping the officer would ride into an ambush.  Stockton saw through Hall’s plan, knowing Hall was involved with the gang, so he made a plan of his own.  Deputy Marshals Stockton and Sam Eaton, along with several other lawmen had Bob Hall ride in front, to direct their group.  The lawmen confronted the gang in the darkness at the outlaw’s camp five miles south of Wilburton, where they mounted their horses and made their escape.  The next morning the lawmen returned to the outlaw’s camp to find one of the outlaws, John Feathersten, dead from the night’s battle.  Another gang member was captured who testified that Bob Hall had taken a part in the robbery.  Bob Hall was taken before Judge Parker at  Ft. Smith, Arkansas, but was returned to the Indian courts because he had an Indian wife and the defendant, Squire Riddle, was an Indian, which placed the charge into Indian jurisdiction.  In the Indian court, Bob Hall received lashes at the old store building at Red Oak.  The whipping was conducted by his wife’s uncle who made the lashes light. Maybe it was deserving that Squire Riddle never saw his money again. 

(West of Hell’s Fringe) (Indian Pioneer History - Samuel L. Davis) (Indian Pioneer History - John E. Lewis) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Stockton, T. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Stokely, Ed A. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, in 1887, under Marshal Jacob Yoes.  Deputy Marshal Frank Dalton, an older brother of the infamous Dalton gang, was killed by William Towerly when he tried to serve a warrant of arrest to Dave Smith, a known horse thief and whiskey runner.  A surprise attack was blotched as Dalton and James Cole rushed into a tent which was occupied not only by Smith but also his sister, brother-in-law and Towerly.  As the smoke cleared the battle scene, Dave Smith, his sister and Frank Dalton lay dead and his seriously wounded brother-in-law was taken into custody.  Knowing the officers force would soon be on his trail, Towerly headed for the only safety that he knew, his parent’s homestead west of Atoka.  Almost a week passed before the killer reached his destination which was being scouted by the deputy marshal and posse.  On the morning of December 3, 1887, Towerly was spotted and ordered to surrender by Deputy Marshal Stokely of White Bead Hill.  Knowing that death was eminent, either by the bullet or the hangman’s noose, Towerly decided to take his chances in shooting his way out of the scrap.  While under cover, Deputy Moody returned fire, shooting Towerly, knocking him to the ground where he appeared to be unarmed and seriously wounded.  Making a move to contain his prisoner, Stokely moved closer, not knowing that he had rearmed himself.  Two shots struck the approaching officer in the heart causing death within ten minutes.  To injured to retreat or escape, Towerly exchanged gunfire with the posse until his ammunition ran out.  The wounded outlaw had been hit five times breaking an arm and a leg, but he managed to live for several hours.   Ed Stokely’s body was buried in the Gainesville, Texas city cemetery.  Stokely started his earlier life as a Texas cowboy which led to trouble when he stopped at Hunnewell, Kansas, during a cattle drive in 1881.  A saloon girl, jealous bartender and poor judgment resulted in trouble for the young cowboy as he was drawn into a duel which left the bartender dead.  Killing a man and being a stranger in a foreign territory was not a good situation to be in, so a trip was made to Mexico to wait until things cooled off.  In July of 1886, a Kansas sheriff who would not forget the incident traveled to Oklahoma Territory to return Stokely to Sumner County, Kansas, where he received six months in lock-up.  With the help of Deputy Marshal Heck Thomas, he received a full commission as deputy marshal in the Western District of Arkansas court at Fort Smith, Arkansas.  During the summer of 1887, he moved to White Bead, Chickasaw Nation where he worked with Heck Thomas and Bill Moody. 

(Indian Chieftain, Vinita - December 8, 1887) (Heck Thomas) (Ed Stokely, I. T. Deputy Marshal) (Outlaws and Peace Officers) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)    Killed in the line of duty.

 

A DESPERATE BATTLE

At Atoka, I. T., Between United States Marshals and a Desperado—Two Men Killed

 

December 10, 1887—The Purcell Register—E. A. Stokley, deputy United States marshal, was killed at 7 o’clock Saturday morning, five miles from Atoka, at the residence of old man Towerly, by the noted boy horse thief and murderer, Bill Towerly.

          Deputy Marshal Stokley, in connection with William Moody, John McAllister and James Wallace, went to the house of the father of young Towerly who they were intending to arrest for assisting in the murder of deputy United States marshal, Dalton, who was killed near Fort Smith on the 27th of November last.  Young Towerly had arrived at his father’s late Friday night, of which fact the deputy marshals were very soon informed, and by 7 o’clock Saturday morning they had surrounded the house, at which time, Bill Towerly appeared in the yard and opened fire on them.  Stokley shot him thorough the leg (not desiring to kill him, and with the expectation of taking him alive), and assistant Marshal Moody shot him in the right shoulder.  These wound caused him to fall to the ground and drop his revolver which he quickly grasped with his left hand, and when Stokley ran up to him he was shot twice by the fiend before he could be dispatched.  One ball, a 45 calibers, passed through Stokley’s body entering near the heart, while the second one that passed through entered the body above and near the right groin. Stokey lived but a few minutes after the received the fatal shot.

          Towlery kept up the fusillade until he empted his revolver which he then threw toward his father, who was near by at the time, requesting the father to load it for him, and hand it back that he nigh kill the whole posse.

          During all this time he was being fired at by William Moody, who had approached near the desperado at the out-set, but was retarded from doing very effective shooting for awhile by the mother and sister of young Towerly. They having taken hold of Moody, and continued to push him back, clawing the skin off his hands, and finally getting him in the house and closing the door on him.  Moody then shot at the fiend through the window until the wretch was disabled so as he could do no further damage.  Towerly received eight gun shot wounds from which he died at 7 o’clock this evening.

          Towerly was but twenty years old, and was one of the hardest characters in the Territory, being a noted horse thief and murderer.

          Ed Stokley, the deceased marshal, was one of the coolest and bravest officers in the service.  He was twenty-seven years old, and when at home lived with his father near Marietta, I. T.  He has been connected with the public service, more or less, for the last two years, and last June was appointed United State deputy marshal and has had a posse with him since.  He was widely known and well liked by all good people and law and order citizens.  He was to have been married on the 25th of next January to Miss Josie Peterman who resides near Calisbury, this county. The body was brought to Gainesville over the Missouri Pacific, Sunday afternoon, and taken to the house of Harvey Hulen, where it was kept till time for burial, 10 o’clock a.m., Monday.

          A large procession followed the deceased to the city cemetery, where the body was interred.

          Mr. Stokley lost his life trying to save the life of the desperado whom he was trying to capture; for had he desired to shoot him down on sight he could have done so but by his clemency shown the brute Towery, he lost his own life; and a braver boy, nor a more vigilant and trusty young man never gave his life for a any case in the faithful discharge of his official duty.

          This makes fifteen United States marshals attacked and killed in the Indian Territory during the past two years. 

 

Stone, C. C. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Stopey, Edward was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Starmer, Stormer, George G. was commissioned in July of 1894, serving under Marshal Evett Nix at Perry, Oklahoma Territory.  Stormer and John Boyle attempted to arrest Jim Campbell, a half breed Osage who was wanted for stealing horses.  In March of 1895, the two deputy marshals found Campbell asleep at a friend’s house, a few miles north of Pawnee.  When the officers approached the house, Campbell ran to his horse still in his night clothing, carrying his Winchester rifle.  A running fight occurred during which one of the deputies’ horses was killed.  In February 1896, Stormer was at the Perry District when Marshal Patrick Nagle replaced Marshal Evett Nix.  Deputy Marshal Starmer was assigned a case of counterfeiting in Creek County where a large amount of counterfeit currency was turning up.  He located a large cave where he took his posse to make a raid.  They confiscated a number of dies that were perfect.  A man named A. Maden and his wife surrendered without any resistance to the officers.  The couple was tried in Guthrie before Judge Dale and given ten years in the federal penitentiary.  

(The Woodward Jeffersonian - March 16, 1895) (The Alva Chronicle - April 26, 1895) (West of Hell’s Fringe) (Shoot from the Lip) (Charles Francis Colcord) (Picture-Oklahombres) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Stormer    

George 

G.

D.U.S. Marshal

Perry

March 11, 1905

 

Stormer, W. T. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Stotts, James was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Stout, W. L. was commissioned in Oklahoma Territory in October of 1894, under Marshal Evett Nix. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Strange, John was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Strickland   

Debbie

E.

D.U.S. Marshal

September 10, 1906 to February 13, 1907

 

Strickland, W. E. of Tulsa went before a grand jury on charges of making false entries.  Marshal Leo Bennett released Strickland as field deputy just before he was called before the grand jury.  Strickland was recovering from a serious bullet wound that he received Christmas of 1906, while arresting two bootleggers.  Strickland claimed he arrested more bootleggers than any other deputy in Indian Territory. 

(The Sterrett Sun - December 21, 1906) (The Seiling Guide - March 7, 1907)

 

MALFEASANCE IN OFFICE CHARGED

Grand Jury Indicts Formal Deputy Marshal And Posse Man

 

March 3, 1907--Tulsa, Indian Territory-- The grand at some pulpit today returned 10 indictments against former deputy United States Marshal W. E. Strickland of Tulsa and eight indictments against posse man John Querry of Tulsa.  The indictments charge false entries in accounts and general malfeasance in office.  Bond was fixed in the sum of $2000 each.

          United States Marshal Leo E. Bennett of Muskogee recently dismissed Strickland as field Deputy for Tulsa.  He is recovering from a serious bullet wound in the neck received while attempting to arrest to bootleggers near Tulsa last Christmas.

          Strickland claims to have arrested more whiskey peddlers than any other Deputy and Indian Territory.

 

Strickler, Ben was commissioned on May 8, 1891.

 (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office)

 

Stringfield, J. K. served in the Northern Judicial District in 1895. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Stroud, F. M. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Stroud, John P. was commissioned on July 23, 1873, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal John N. Sarber.  Deputy Marshal Stroud lived in Sebastian County, Arkansas when commissioned. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Story    

George 

D.

D.U.S. Marshal

Muskogee  

May 1, 1898 I. T. Northern--July 1, 1902 I. T. Western

 

Story    

George 

S.

D.U.S. Marshal

March 13, 1905

 

Stowe    

Charles

L.

U. S. Marshal

Ardmore

December 12, 1895

 

Strozier, John served in the Central District in 1893 and 1894.  In July of 1888, Deputy Marshal Strozier was working with fellow officers Trammell, Wheeler and Fry at Black Springs, Arkansas trying to break up a ring of bootleggers who were operating a large number of stills.  The demand for liquor in Indian Territory was great at this time.  The marshal’s force found three stills and destroyed mash tubs at several other sites, arresting the operators.  Two men, Joseph Pepper and Cogburn were taken into custody and the rest of the gang was released.  The next day, officer Trammell, Fry and Wheeler were on a recognizance mission when they approached some heavy underbrush along the road.  Officer Trammell turned his horse to look back down the road, when five of the bootleggers fired a shot striking him squarely in the breast.  The other two lawmen dismounted, taking cover, fearing that the outlaws would continue toward them.  To their surprise, they retreated firing only one more shot.  Being out numbered, they found two women in the area to watch the body of Trammell while they went to Black Springs to report the incident.  The people living in that vicinity were afraid of retaliation if they testified against the outlaws, so at the inquest a case could not be made against them.  However, the men that killed Trammell were identified as the brother and cousin of Cogburn who was being held in custody.  Deputy Marshal Dave Rusk brought Carter Markham, Matthew Pervine, Joseph Pepper and Cogburn in on charges of participating in the killing of officer Trammell and writs on illicit distilling.  All of the men were released when no one came to testify against them.  Their examination was a mere farce, as they were surrounded by well armed friends who would have released them, if they had been bound over.  The sheriff advised Rusk not to be present at the examination for it would be to dangerous and he would most likely be killed.  He then requested that Trammell’s two alleged murders, Lafayette and Frank Cogburn be turned over to him and assist him in getting them out of the country.  The sheriff told him he did not have enough men to do the task.  When the governor of the state, withdrew the two hundred reward for the murders the deputy marshals knew their lives were in danger.  Deputy Marshals John Porter, Strozier, Caine and Wheeler left Black Springs immediately, going to Crystal Springs for reasons of safety.  After resting, they went to Hot Springs where they caught a train to Ft. Smith.  Strozier and Jim Caine remained at Crystal Springs with the horses feeling they would be safe there. All parties were released and justice was never served for Trammell’s death.

 (Ft. Smith Elevator - July 6; August 3, 1888) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Stuart, William N. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Stufflebean, Thomas E. was commissioned on June 10, 1891, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  He was again commissioned while living in Tulsa, Creek Nation.  After resigning his commission as deputy marshal, Stufflebean became involved in a feud with the Millers, taking the side of the McElroys. who wanted the Miller’s land.   The McElroys tried to remove the Millers from their homestead by placing and bringing charges against them.  When this did not work, they enlisted outsiders like Stufflebean to use force to try to drive them off of their land.  In April of 1894, Bruce and El Miller living one-half mile apart became aware of a threat made on those living in the Bruce Miller home.  On the evening of April 15, Bruce Miller, his family, “Dutch John” a young German boy and Sam Patch, a farmhand, went across the field to his brother’s home, to spend the night.  Early the next morning, “Dutch John” left the house to return to Bruce Miller’s home, to do chores.  He had walked about forty yards when he was mortally wounded by a gang of men who fired on him from the nearby trees.  Mrs. Miller feared the mob was still present, but felt the need to cover the boy’s body to protect it from the sun and insects. As she approached the body she was shot in the arm by the cowards.  Young Sherman Miller, only six years old, was also shot in the shoulder and Bruce Miller had the waist band of his trousers cut with a bullet.  Sam Patch was not wounded but was captured and held captive by the mob which proved fatal to the mob when he later identified them and their activities, such as burning the Miller homes.  McElroy and several other men including Stufflebean were arrested and stood trial at Ft. Smith.  Shortly after the trial, Bruce Miller was killed at Ingalls through the open window of a saloon.  McElroy received a sentence of twelve years and Stufflebean’s evolvement in the matter got him a prison sentence of nine years.  Shortly after the conviction “Date” Miller, an elder brother of Bruce and El Miller, with his aged wife and young son, Dorsey, were all killed in their beds as they slept.  All of them had been important witnesses for the government. 

(Hell on the Border-Harman) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Stutts, R. L was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Sublett, Henry W. was commissioned in the Southern District Indian Territory in the Ardmore District Court.  He was assigned duty at Mill Creek, Chickasaw Nation after Deputy Marshal John Poe was killed by bootleggers.  The bootleggers in Mill Creek were an organized group that joined forces to declare war on deputy marshals that tried to stop or slow their activities.  This officer had been warned to stay at home during the night with his wife or bad things would happen.  In September of 1905, Henry tried to arrest one of the bootleggers but found himself victimized by several of his partners.  He was hit with two shot gun blasts loaded with BB’s, that struck him in the abdomen with the main thrust striking his belt buckle, which probably saved his life.  The second blast hit his left hand, nearly tearing it off.  A physician could not save the hand, and had to amputate it at the wrist.  A telegraph was sent to Ada, Chickasaw Nation, to summon Deputy Marshals Cummings and Brents to bring their posse men to Mill Creek.  Bloodhounds were also requested to no avail for clues and trails were never found for the scoundrels covered their tracks and left no evidence. The severity of Sublett’s wounds indicated his attackers wanted to make an example out of him.   This appeared to be a warning to any deputy that might take his place and what they could expect if they took his job. The Marietta Monitor reported officer Sublette was shot in ambush as he entered his yard in darkness.  Oklahombres shows a W.W. Sublette being killed on November 2, 1905.  Could this be Henry W. Sublette? 

(Indian Pioneer History - James R. Hutchins) (Oklahombres) (Gunman’s Territory) (Marietta Monitor - September 8, 1905) (The Putnam Pioneer - September 15, 1905)

 

Suggs, John was commissioned on October 24, 1888, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Sullivan, D. T. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Summerhill, T. A. traveled through Caddo on his way to Ft. Smith, Arkansas from Ft. Washita, Choctaw Nation.  He reported that he had a rich lead that would increase his line of business.   On October 15, 1875, a white woman, Mrs. Henson living at Downing Ranch, which is fourteen miles east of Atoka, was found lying face down in a pool of blood with her baby in her arms.  She evidently snatched her baby from its crib before her murderer struck her with the final blows.  She was stabbed three times in her breast and a final blow through her back.  Deputy Marshal Summerhill investigated the crime and arrested an Indian for murder and robbery.  The Indian was taken to Ft. Smith, Arkansas to stand trial before Judge Parker.  Deputy Marshal Summerhill also made an arrest of Joe Williams, a Negro who was wanted for the murder of John Joseph, in May of 1876.  (Caddo Starr - May 16, 1876) (Vindicator - October 27, 1875) (Vindicator - May 10, 1876)

 

Sumpter, F. P. was commissioned on June 22, 1893, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George J. Crump.  Deputy Marshal Sumpter lived in Snow, Arkansas when commissioned. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft Smith Historical List)

 

Sumpter      

Robert

O.

D. U. S. Marshal

Coalgate

April 16, 1905

 

 

U. S. Marshal Slain; 5 Held At Coalgate

Bob Sumpter Killed As He Raids Liquor Still Near Lehigh

 

August 10, 1933--Coalgate, OK--With five suspects in the slaying of Robert O. Sumpter, veteran United States deputy marshal, lodged in jail, officers of two counties joined Wednesday night in searching for a sixth man.

          Names of the six were withheld.

          Sumpter, a deputy United States marshal since Oklahoma became a state in 1907, was shot to death late Wednesday as he raided single-handed a whiskey still two miles northeast of Lehigh.

          He was stationed at Ada and all available officers there rushed to join in the hunt for the accused men.  The call for assistance precipitated an unfounded rumor of threatened mob violence.

Body Found In Brush

          Sumpter's body was found in the brush by Paul Mayer.  Coalgate business man, who drove out with the deputy marshal but did not accompany him on the actual raid.  He heard no shots, but when his companion did not return in an hour, went to look for him.  Mayer found the body, with wounds in the head, back and side.

          Four empty shotgun shells were found at the still, not far from Sumpter's body.  The still was in operation.

          Suimpter, about 60 years old has been a peace officer since statehood and has many friends in this section.

Served For Ten Years

          The slain officer is survived by his wife, Robert O. Sumpter jr., instructor at Southeaster State Teachers college, Durant, and a daughter, Cleo Sumpter.  Funeral arrangements had not been made Wednesday night.

 

Surrell, John R. served in the Central District in 1894. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Sutterfield, Hiram was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Swafford, H. S. was commissioned on September 10, 1889, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Swain, John D. was commissioned on February 20, 1889 and May 31, 1889 in the Southern District, Indian Territory at the Ardmore District.  He rode with Heck Thomas in the Chickasaw Nation to arrest murderers, Tom Ike, John Davis and Emmanuel Patterson.  On August 11, 1880, Patterson killed Deputy Marshal Willard Ayers near Cherokee Town when the officer tried to serve a warrant of arrest for larceny.  In February of 1887, he had to answer charges of killing a man named Donahoe at Mt. Summit, Chickasaw Nation, over a game of cards.  In January of 1889, He rode with Deputy Marshal James J. McAlester to arrest Malachi Allen.  Refer to J. J. McAlester for details in the arrest.  In 1891, Swain was with the posse that rode to capture the Hudgins Gang who terrorized the area around Fred, near the Washita River, east of Ardmore.  Bill Hudgins was charged in seventeen cases of horse stealing and one case of robbery.  The outlaw was also charged with the murder of Will Carey at Fred, Indian Territory. Deputy Marshal George Stewart and Swain collected the $2000 reward paid for the capture of Bill Hudgins.  In October of 1891, John was working with Deputy Marshal J. D. Mynatt when they arrested a horse rustler named Hickman who was taken to jail in Paris, Texas and tried in the federal court.  In 1892, Swain was working from the Purcell area where he was in charge of a posse that used a train car to transport them and their horses to intercept the Dalton gang after they had robbed a train in Red Rock.  In October of 1894, Swain was working  Deputy Marshal Matt Cook when they arrested two whiskey peddlers on the Canadian River at Ikes Crossing, fifteen miles south of Purcell. Oklahombres reports John Swain was killed in 1888 to 1897. Indian Pioneer History interviewer Sam Browles reported that John Swain was killed by a man named Venson in Purcell, Chickasaw Nation.  Deputy Marshal Scrivner gave testimony in the Paris, Texas court that Swain was involved in cattle rustling.  Evidence was strong enough that Swain was relieved of his commission.   Swain became bitter, holding a grudge against Scrivner which caused him to make threatening statements against him.  His hatred grew until he finally made a trip to Purcell to find him.  Scrivner was away from Purcell, transporting prisoners to jail in Paris, Texas, when Swain came calling.  Swain, being in an ugly mood, crossed paths with Charley Vinson and his father, who were also feuding with Swain, feeling he was holding all the good land along the Canadian River.  The Vinsons were riding in a wagon and Swain was riding horseback when they met.  The bad blood caused them to fire on each other as they came into shooting distance. Swain was shot from his horse, falling to the ground where he laid motionless, appearing to be dead.  Charley’s father thinking John was dead jumped out of the wagon, approaching Swain as he lay prostrate on the ground.  John holding his six shooter in his hand rolled over shooting old man Vinson, killing him instantly.  It has never been certain if the bullet that killed John Swain was fired by Charley Vinson’s father’s gun or from his son.  Those that knew John Swain all agreed that he was one of the toughest deputy marshals that ever lived. 

(Ft. Smith Elevator - February 4, 1887; January 11, July 26, 1889; February 27, 1891) (Citizen - February 8, 1890) (Indian Citizen - May 3, 1890) (The Territorial Topic - October 29, 1891) (The Advocate - October 19, 1894) (Indian Pioneer History - Sam Browles) (Indian Pioneer History - Dave C. Hybarger) (Indian Pioneer History - Billy McPeters) (Indian Pioneer History - E. H. Scrivner) (Indian Pioneer History - J. S. Tyson) (Indian Pioneer History - John W. Watson) (Oklahombres) (Picture-The Chronicles Of Oklahoma - Summer 1990) (Selden Lindsey) (Heck Thomas) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Swan, Oliver tried to arrest a Negro, W. A. Johnson at Wilburn where he was killed in October of 1907.  (Lenora Leader - October 18, 1907)    Killed in the line of duty.

 

Sweden, F. M. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, by Marshal John Carrol, where he served as special deputy.  In April of 1886, Sweden returned to his home to find Wilburn his nephew by marriage, beating his wife.  Sweden tried to stop the physical abuse and found himself the victim as Wilburn shot him through the heart with his Winchester rifle.  Mrs. Sweden was also killed as Wilburn shot at her son as he ran from the house.  The boy ran two or three miles and was unable to return home.  The following day a crowd of people went to the home where they found the body of Sweden which had been placed in their water well. 

(Ft. Smith Elevator - May 7, 1886) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)    K

 

Sweet, W. E. was commissioned on August 16, 1892, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  Sweet was commissioned again on May 9, 1893, while living in Huntington, Arkansas.  In May of 1893, Deputy Marshal Sweet arrested counterfeiter Sam Etchinson and Hiram Gibson charged with perjury, taking them to the federal jail in Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  Sweet lived in Polk County, Arkansas.

(The Weekly Elevator - May 5, 1893) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Sweetman, was arrested in March of 1893, on horse stealing charges.  The deputy marshal pleaded not guilty and was placed on three days advisement.  He was released on a $1000 bail and a new trial was ordered for March 30, 1893. 

(The Kingfisher Times - March 9, 1893)

 

Swift, George M. was selected as office deputy in April of 1905, in the Atoka court by Marshal George Pritchard of the Central District. 

(The Durant Times - April 21, 1905)

 

Swift    

George 

M. 

D.U.S. Marshal

South McAllister

August 1, 1904

 

Swift, J. H. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Swil, G. W. was commissioned on June 9, 1893, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  Deputy Marshal Swil was living in Canneyville, Kansas when commissioned. 

(Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Swirl, G. E. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Swink, William “Bill served in the Central District in 1893 and 1894.  He was remembered as a deputy marshal working under Judge Spaulding in the Choctaw Nation by Belle Hinds in Indian Pioneer History. 

(Indian Pioneer History - Belle Hinds) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)