Back to King Index

 

ROBERT KING'S OKLAHOMA U. S. MARSHALS AND DEPUTY U. S. MARSHALS

Lacey to Warren Lurty

 

Lacey, was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Lacey, Martin A. was commissioned on September 19, 1892, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Lackey, John H. was commissioned on October 2, 1891, in the Western District at Ft. Smith Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Lacy, was sworn into the Northern District Indian Territory in 1897. 

(Picture - Experience of A U.S. Deputy Marshal)

 

Lacy, Joseph L. was commissioned on December 1, 1894, in the District Court at Muskogee, Creek Nation.  Deputy Marshal Lacy lived in Webber Falls, Chickasaw Nation.  (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Lacy, J. M. was commissioned on July 17, 1893, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under George J. Crump.  Deputy Marshal Lacy lived in Neosho, Missouri.  (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Lacy, Thomas E was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Ladd, W L. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes.  In July of 1891, a Negro desperado, Jeff Shoale killed L. V. Baldwin near Baldwin.  Deputy Marshal Lad was sent to serve a warrant of arrest to the outlaw in August of 1891 and became engaged in a gun battle in which both Ladd and Shoale were killed. 

(Ft. Smith Elevator - August 8, 1890)    Killed in the line of duty.

 

Ladd, W. T. was a deputy marshal who was working in the Choctaw Nation in 1890, when the officers confronted  notorious highwayman Eastman Battiste.  Battiste was a Choctaw Indian who preyed on any traveler that came his way.  In May of 1889, John Hyde, a white man, was traveling along the trail near Caddo when he passed through Battiste’s area.  Battiste, seeing the traveler was white and traveling alone, robbed him of his possessions and killed him.  A common saying among the highwaymen in this area was “Dead Men Tell No Tales”.  Deputy Marshal Ladd knew that a gun battle was evident when he confronted the robber and murderer.  A gun battle did develop which left the outlaw dead.  The Ft. Smith Elevator reported on January 2, 1891, that Deputy Marshal Bill Ladd murdered his wife and then shot himself at Antlers a few days ago. 

(The Territorial Topic - January 30, 1890) (Ft. Smith Elevator - January 2, 1891)    Killed in the line of duty.

 

LaFlore, Louis was appointed as office deputy in 1904, for Marshal George K. Prichard of the Central District.  Deputy Marshal Leflore was stationed in Atoka, Choctaw Nation.  (Woodward Bulletin - April 1, 1904) (The Choctaw News - June 2, 1904)

 

Lake, M. F. was commissioned on May 4, 1894, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George J. Crump.  He was commissioned from October of 1894 through December of 1895, living in Pawnee, Oklahoma Territory. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Lake, Frank was assigned to Pawnee on July 15, 1893, appointed by Marshal Evett Nix of Oklahoma Territory.  Lake rode with Deputy Marshal Chris Madsen to capture the Bill Doolin Gang.  In May of 1894, Steve Burke and William Nix captured Ben Cravens and William Crittenden who were placed in the Perry jail.  The Perry jail was not secure enough to hold the outlaws.  After escaping they were soon recaptured and placed in the Newkirk jail where they again escaped.  Cravens was captured this time by Deputy Marshal Frank Canton and Frank Lake.

(Bill Doolin O. T.) (Charles Francis Colcord) (Picture - Oklahombres) (Picture - West of Hell’s Fringe)

 

Lally, Martin A. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Lamb, Charles J. was commissioned on October 28, 1891 in the Western District of Arkansas.  In March of 1892, he served a warrant of arrest to Frank Hamilton for charges of adultery committed in the Cherokee Nation.  He was commissioned again on June 5, 1893, while living in Tahlequah, Cherokee Nation.  In September of 1893, Deputy Marshal Lamb arrested Willie Squirrel near Tahlequah, Cherokee Nation for introducing and selling liquor in the Indian Nation.  The prisoner was taken to federal jail in Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  In November of 1894, two brothers, John and George Pierce, traveled from Missouri to Indian Territory to seek employment.   A friend they knew from childhood, William Vandever was in their companionship when they arrived at Spring River, eight miles inside of the Cherokee Nation.  After working several weeks the two brothers headed toward Tahlequah with a horse and colt that once belonged to Vandever.  On January 15, 1895, while camped alongside the trail, Deputy Marshals Lamb, Bob Clark and Ed Reed confronted them, inquiring about the mare and colt they had in their possession.  Inspection of their belongings revealed a pair of boots and a suit that once belonged to Vandever.  They explained the boots were found on the prairie and Vandever left the suit, mare and colt when he became frightened after shooting a man’s dog along the trail.  In his fear, he took a train to Texas and asked them to return his horses to his family in Missouri.  After being arrested, the brothers were taken back the same way they came and shown a dead body, identified as Vandever.  They said they never saw this person before and it was not Vandever.  Following their arrest, they were taken to the Ft. Smith jail to stand trial and were executed on the gallows, April 30, 1896.  Charles Lamb died in October of 1901. 

(Ft. Smith Elevator - March 18, 1892; September 7, 1894) (The Weekly Elevator - September 8, 1893) (Hell on the Border - Harman) (Woodward Bulletin - November 1, 1901) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Lamb, William was commissioned on November 1, 1892, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Lambert, William served in Central District in 1894. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Lambkin, E. M. was commissioned on April 27, 1896, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  Deputy Marshal Lambkin lived in Poteau, Choctaw Nation.

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Lamons, Stephen A. was commissioned on March 9, 1892, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. In December of 1893, Deputy Marshals Lamons and Bauck were working the Creek Nation where they made several arrests.  Noble Dennis and Charles Walker were apprehended near Ft. Gibson on assault charges.  Ed Ross was arrested on larceny charges for robbing the express office in Ft. Gibson.  The prisoners were transported to the Ft. Smith federal jail to await trial.

 (The Weekly Elevator - December 22, 1893) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Lampston, Dean was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.

 (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Lampton, telegraphed Marshal Crump in October of 1894, the Gibson Station had been robbed.  The small town was hit by the Bill Cook Gang.  The express office and stores were all robbed.  Six men took part in the robberies.  The Illinois Station was also robbed and the deputy marshals felt they were close in making contact with the gang.  Ten men were spotted near the Illinois Station and it was felt that they were staking out the station for a train robbery.  Crump’s response to the telegraph was to shoot Bill Cook on sight. 

(The Advocate - November 2, 1894)

 

Lamson, Rube was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.

 (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Land, J. W. was appointed as field deputy marshal in April of 1904, by Marshal George K. Pritchard of the Central District Indian Territory.  Deputy Marshal Land was stationed in Carbon.

 (Woodward Bulletin - April 1, 1904) (The Choctaw News - June 2, 1904)

 

Land  

J.

W.

D.U.S. Marshal

McAlester

4/16/1908 OK Eastern--1907 I. T. Central

 

Former Deputy Has Disappeared

Relatives of J. W. Land Believe He Has Met With Foul Play

 

January 11, 1919—McAlester, OK—Sheriffs and police departments throughout eastern Oklahoma are being requested to make inquiries and investigations to ascertain the present whereabouts of J. W. Land of Krebs, former deputy United States marshal and late candidate for sheriff of Pittsburg County.

          Land has been missing from his home since January 2, and his relatives believe that he has met with foul play.  As an officer he incurred the enmity of many persons in the law-breaking class, and it is believed that he has been killed by some enemy or has been the victim of some highwayman for his money.

          An active investigation has been started.

 

Landers, Al was remembered as a deputy marshal by Charles Hepner and Clara Clifford in Indian Pioneer History. 

(Indian Pioneer History - Charles Hepner - Clara Clifford)

 

Landis, Allen J. was commissioned on June 5, 1893, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  Deputy Marshal Landis lived in Bartlesville, Osage Nation.

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Lane, Joe R. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Langley, F. C. was commissioned at Alva, Oklahoma Territory, in July of 1894 through June of 1896, serving under Marshal Evett Nix, assigned to Woods County.  The Cleo Eagle-Chief newspaper showed Langley to be a deputy marshal assigned to Major County.

 (Cleo Eagle-Chief - March 8, 1894) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Oklahombres)

 

Langley, Pete was assigned to the Cheyenne Reservation replacing Deputy Marshal Will Etherton. 

(Indian Pioneer History - Will Etherton)

 

Langston   

Jack

H.

D.U.S. Marshal

Guthrie

Guthrie-4/1/1911 OK Western--Guymon-November 19, 1907 OK Western

 

Large, Sam was commissioned at Guthrie, Oklahoma Territory from July of 1894 through December of 1896, serving under Marshals Evett Nix and Patrick S. Nagle.  He shot and killed T. V. Powell in August of 1894, while trying to serve a warrant of arrest for horse rustling, ten miles southeast of Cleveland.  Large rode under Captain Lillie and Deputy Marshal Red Lucas when a warrant was served to “Chicago” a member of the Doolin Gang near Alva at Chimney Rock.  In March of 1895, Large brought in G. W. Wilson from the Creek Nation who was charged with killing Zack Thatch on Rock Creek.  The murdered man was an uncle to Wilson who when arrested had the dead man’s money and goods on his person.  He did not deny the ownership of either but said his uncle had left him in charge of the outfit before going to Shawneetown.  He entertained hopes that his uncle was still alive.  The corpse of a man was found near where he had camped.  The body was partially decomposed but the marshals made a partial recognition thinking it was the uncle of Wilson.  No papers were found on the body for definite proof.  Large took Wilson to Ft. Smith to stand trial.  (Watonga Republican - March 20, 1895) (Experience Of A U.S. Deputy Marshal) (Shoot from the Lip) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Large 

Sam

D.U.S. Marshal

Shawnee

March 11, 1905

 

Largen, R. T. was commissioned on June 23, 1894, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George J. Crump.  Deputy Marshal Largen lived in Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Larney, Este was commissioned on January 23, 1895, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George J. Crump.  Deputy Marshal Larney was commissioned again on July 3, 1896, while living in Wewoka, Creek Nation. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Latham, Thomas B. was commissioned as deputy marshal in the federal court at Antlers, Choctaw Nation in 1900.  In April of 1907, a young girl named Mismer was home alone when a Negro named Jim Williams came by wanting food.  The young girl ordered him to leave.  He took the girl and assaulted her for more than forty minutes.  Williams fled to the woods looking for an avenue of escape for his deeds.  When the town of Colbert heard the story, a search was started.  Six local Negroes joined the search and one of them captured Williams, turning him over to deputy marshals working out of Durant.  The Deputy Marshals A. N. Wilcox, T. J. Sexton, Tom Latham, C. L. Dobbs and Sam Cone assembled several Negroes into a lineup where the young girl identified Williams and a revolver he took from her home.  The Negro was taken to Sterrett, (present day Calera) where the deputies waited to catch a train before a mob could take their prisoner from them.  A group of men rushed the train station, ripping the door off its hinges.  The officers drew their guns and held their ground for a moment but the number of men proved too great as they pushed their way through the door and crawled through the windows.  The four officers, against the huge mob who were crying for the life of the prisoner, were too few to protect him.  As the train came into the station more men joined the party and the Negro was marched away to an old oil derrick where he was badly beaten and his throat slashed.  He was suspended high in the air as a hundred shots were fired with only one bullet finding its resting place in his side. 

(The Antlers Democrat - January 26, 1900) (The Durant Statesman - April 5, 1907) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Latta, was commissioned at Van Buren, Arkansas, serving before any marshal was placed over Indian Territory.  In March of 1851, Marshal George Knox was placed over the District Court at Van Buren.  In 1846, along the Texas Road, near Fort Washita, Choctaw and Chickasaw Nations, a number of Cherokees settled along the rivers where they were engaged in stealing horses.  Emigrants traveling the trail from the Boggy Depot area to Fort Washita traveling to and from Texas became their prey.  It was found that the Starr gang, who established headquarters at Younger Bend on the Canadian River in the Cherokee Nation, ran stolen horses to Texas and brought back stolen horses when they returned to the Cherokee Nation.  In October of 1847, Mat Geurring broke into a home of a free mulatto and mixed-Cherokee blood people at Fort Gibson and kidnapped two girls.  In the presence of the girls’ mother the girls were tied and carried off to the states.  Deputy Marshal Latta was called to try to arrest the gang and arrested Tom Starr in Evansville, Arkansas.  Starr had a previous murder charge for killing an old Negro man in Crawford County, Arkansas. Tom Starr was in jail in Clarksville, Arkansas in 1848 when he and Michael Doolin escaped jail.   Deputy Marshals Latta and Smith was summoned from Van Buren, Arkansas to serve warrants of arrest in the Flint District in June of 1848.  During the attempted arrest, Mat Guerrin, the notorious land pirate, Ellis Starr and Washington Starr were killed. 

(Cherokee Advocate - October 7, 1847; May 29, June 5, June 12, July 3, 1848) (The Five Civilized Tribes)

 

Lauderback, John H. was commissioned on July 16, 1872, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, under Marshal Logan S. Roots.  Deputy Marshal Lauderback lived in Ft. Smith, Arkansas.

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Laughrin, Frank, was appointed deputy marshal by Marshal Grimes of Oklahoma Territory in January of 1891.  Deputy Marshal Laughrin was assigned to the eastern part of Beaver County, Oklahoma Territory.

 (The Territorial Advocate - March 4, 1891.)

 

Lausory, G. P. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Law      

Adolph

D.U.S. Marshal

Ardmore

February 20, 1897

 

Law, L. P. was commissioned in the Southern District of Indian Territory at Paris, Texas, in 1894.  He served as Special Deputy Marshal.

 (U.S. Deputy Marshal, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Lawrence, was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List

 

Lawrence, Sam was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  Deputy Marshal Lawrence arrested Silas and Corpelius Homes on larceny charges.  The two prisoners were taken to the Ft. Smith federal jail to await trial. 

(Ft. Smith Elevator - December 25, 1885) (Picture - Muskogee Genealogical Society) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Lawson, George P. was commissioned on July 19, 1893, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, while living in Yellville, Arkansas.  He conducted twelve of the eighty-six executions at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  In December of 1891, John Pointer killed two men named Baird and Bolding after stealing a team and wagon from them, four miles from Wilburton, Choctaw Nation.  Deputy Marshal Lawson was given the privilege of arresting John Pointer and transporting him to the federal jail in Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  On June 4, 1894, Deputy Marshals Lindsey Hart and George Lawson led a posse to the Wallace farm near Elk, Oklahoma, where “Loss” Hart shot William Dalton as he tried to escape.  William Dalton was second in command in the Bill Doolin Gang.  In February of 1895, George was working with fellow Deputy Marshal Grant Johnson when they arrested Wade Chamberlee in a Muskogee saloon.  Chamberlee was wanted for the Blackstone train robbery. George worked with Deputy Marshal W. C. Smith to persuade friends of outlaw, Cherokee Bill, to divulge evidence and Bill’s whereabouts.   The disclosed information resulted in Cherokee Bill’s capture, which eventually led to his hanging on the gallows on March 17, 1896.  On August 14, 1896, he was commissioned again while living in Claremore, Cherokee Nation.  In November of 1897, Deputy Marshals Lawson and Heston Bussey tried to arrest Dan Clifton, alias “Dynamite Dick” on the Sid William’s farm which was sixteen miles from Newkirk, Oklahoma.  Dynamite Dick opened fire on the officers when they intercepted him on his horse.   Deputy Marshal Lawson fired back with the slug breaking Dick`s arm which knocked him from his saddle.  The wounded Clifton made his way through the brush to a nearby cabin where he hoped to elude the officers. The lawmen trailed Dynamite to the cabin where the outlaw fired as he ran from the cabin.  The outlaw only made a few yards before he was shot again forcing him to the ground where he died in minutes. Dynamite Dick was the last gang member of the Doolin Gang.  Deputy Marshal Lawson was commissioned again on June 28, 1898.  George Lawson was still alive in 1930 living at Coweta, Oklahoma. 

(The Weekly Elevator - December 15, 1893) (Indian Pioneer History - W. F. Jones) (Hell on the Border - Harman) (Outlaws on Horseback) (The Lawmen) (Experiences of A U.S. Deputy Marshal) (Shoot from the Lip) (Black, Red and Deadly) (Guardian of the Law) (West of Hell’s Fringe) (Encyclopedia of a Western Gun-Fighter) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Lawson    

G.

P.

D.U.S. Marshal

July 1, 1896

 

Lawson, Robert C. was commissioned on May 12, 1871, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Logan S. Roots Deputy Marshal Lawson lived in Ft. Smith, Arkansas.

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Lawson, William H. was commissioned on February 22, 1895, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George J. Crump.  Lawson was a guard for the Western District Court jail at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  Lawson and was on duty when Cherokee Bill and Henry Starr tried to escape from murders Row.  Deputy Marshal Lawson lived in Ft. Smith, Arkansas.

(Picture - Hell on the Border -Harman) (Black Red And Deadly) (Outlaws on Horseback) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Layman, David H. Dave” was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  In 1885, he was one of the oldest deputy marshals in terms of service.  Dave Layman was working in the Chickasaw Nation near the Texas line on April 10, 1883, where he set up camp with three prisoners in custody.  One of the men was the father of Nelson Maroney who was arrested for introducing whiskey into Indian Territory.  The other two men were Gillian and Davis.  The prisoners gained advantage as Gillian shot Layman and as he was falling to the ground, he fired a second shot.  As the fallen officer lay prostate on the ground, Davis shot him two more times to make sure he was dead.  Gillian and Davis escaped while Maroney was captured.  Nelson Maroney was an accessory in the murder.  Maroney received four years for his part in the killing. 

(Ft. Smith Elevator - December 25, 1885; January 1, 1886) (Heck Thomas) (Oklahombres) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)     Killed in the line of duty.

 

Layman, Frank was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Leafy, T. H. was commissioner at Pawhuska, Osage Country when Evett Nix was marshal.  Evett Nix was marshal over Oklahoma Territory from May, 1893 to January, 1896

(Oklahombres)

 

Leake, Charley T. was commissioned on December 12, 1895, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George J. Crump.  Deputy Marshal Leake lived in Southwest City, Missouri. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Leatherman, Letterman, Joe H. was working out of the Western District at Ft. Smith Arkansas, in May of 1899, when he went to the Chickasaw Nation to arrest Henry Deitz who robbed a store in Burneyville.  in September of 1889, he was appointed office deputy marshal in the Southern District Court of Indian Territory at Paris, Texas.  Leatherman served in the Southern District until 1898.   On June 7, 1894, Leatherman rode after the Bill Dalton Gang. 

(Ft. Smith Elevator - May 24, 1889) (The Territorial Topic - September 19, 1889) (Selden Lindsey) (Picture - Notable Men of Indian Territory) (West of Hell’s Fringe) (Ralph Evans - File #1161, Ardmore Library) (Southern District Court Notes - Purcell, November 11, 1901)

 

Leatherman-Letterman     

Joe

H.

D.U.S. Marshal

Purcell

 July 1, 1898 

 

Leatherman, R. E. was appointed as chief deputy marshal at South McAlester in April of 1904, by Marshal George K. Pritchard of the Central District Indian Territory. 

(The Choctaw News - June 2, 1904)

 

Leattens, from the Southern District in Indian Territory at Paris, Texas arrested David Vaughn on larceny charges, in December of 1893.  Vaughn was transported to the Ft. Smith, Arkansas jail to await trial. 

(The Weekly Elevator - December 15, 1893)

 

Ledbetter, James Franklin “Bud” was sworn in as deputy marshal on June 5, 1895, then commissioned on June 25, 1895, by Marshal S. Morton Rutherford in the Northern District of Indian Territory with headquarters at Muskogee.  Marshal Evett Nix had such high regards for him that he gave him a special commission with full authority to represent his office in any emergency that might arrive.  In 1895, James Ledbetter wounded desperado Nathan Reed alias “Texas Jack” near Wagoner, Indian Territory.  The Texas Jack Gang was wanted in Texas, Missouri and Kansas for train robbery.  Texas Jack recovered from his gunshot wounds and reformed.  He spent the rest of his days giving lectures on “Crime Does Not Pay”.   In November 1897, Ledbetter captured Morris O`Malley, of the Jennings - O’Malley Gang on Snake Creek between Checotah and Okmulgee.  The gang, specializing in train robberies, was made up of the Jennings and O’Malley brothers along with several other outlaws who were feared by many citizens in Indian Territory.  Deputy Marshals Bud Ledbetter and Frank Jones confronted an outlaw, known as Zonia who had fled Arizona and joined the Al Jennings gang.  He was confronted at Younger Bend on the Canadian River where shots were exchanged and Zonia was killed.  Remaining Jennings's gang members consisted of Al and Frank Jennings and Pat O’Malley.   Ledbetter captured the rest of the gang on December 6, 1897, near Rock Creek in the Chickasaw Nation. The gang was taken after a gunfight in which Pat O’Malley was shot in the leg and Al Jennings was slightly wounded.  The train robbers were taken to Ardmore, Chickasaw Nation, where they were charged with assault to kill Deputy Marshall Ledbetter.  O’Malley and Frank Jennings received five year sentences.  Al Jennings was given life imprisonment for robbing a federal train in Chickasha, Chickasaw Nation.  In 1895, Bud worked with Jess Jones and McCann to capture the Pemberton - Turner gang near Sapulpa.  Also in 1895, Deputy Marshal Ledbetter took part in the arrest of the ruthless Rufus Buck gang charged with murder, rape assault and highway robbery. The mixed blood gang was executed by hanging on Judge Parker’s gallows on July 11, 1896.  Bud Ledbetter arrested the first two men to be sentenced to death by hanging in the Northern District of Indian Territory. The two prisoners were Henry Whitfield, convicted of murder and K. B. Brooks, a Negro preacher convicted of rape.  The two men went to the gallows in Muskogee on July 1, 1898. This was the first legal hanging in Indian Territory.  Deputy Marshal Ledbetter attempted to arrest Clifton Webb alias “Dynamite Dick”, in the Creek Nation when he escaped from the Muskogee federal jail but when the outlaw resisted arrest Dynamite Dick was killed in the gunfire exchange.  Bud Ledbetter was born in Arkansas in 1852, coming to Vinita, Indian Territory to live in 1893, where he served as city marshal.  Officer Ledbetter served as a deputy marshal for nine years. Bud Ledbetter became sheriff of Muskogee County, known as one of the oldest living officers in the Southwest.  Bud was still living in 1930 at Muskogee, Oklahoma.

(The Antlers Democrat - January 26, 1900) (Marietta Monitor - December 29, 1905) (The Bennington Tribune - August 23, 1906) (The Sterrett Sun - February 23, April 4, 1906) (Indian Pioneer History - Jesse Lee Blakemore) (Indian Pioneer History - J. W. Brewer) (Indian Pioneer History - James Calhoun) (Indian Pioneer History - William Carnahan) (Indian Pioneer History - William C. Cook) (Indian Pioneer History - Mrs. Ellen Cunningham) (Indian Pioneer History - Samuel L. Davis) (Indian Pioneer History - David Dickey) (Indian Pioneer History - Bill Hart) (Indian Pioneer History - Charles Hepner - Clara Clifford) (Indian Pioneer History - Samuel L. Davis) (Indian Pioneer History - W.F. Jones) (Indian Pioneer History - M. B. Louthan) (Indian Pioneer History - D. L. Mayes) (Indian Pioneer History - Sarah McConnell) (Indian Pioneer History - George McIntosh) (Indian Pioneer History - Leland A. Mosteller) (Indian Pioneer History - W.R. Mulkey) (Indian Pioneer History - John Palmer) (Indian Pioneer History - Josephine Pennington) (Indian Pioneer History - Nathan Reed “Texas Jack”) (Indian Pioneer History - John C. Robinson) (Indian Pioneer History - Dan Smith) (Indian Pioneer History - James T. Spencer) (Indian Pioneer History-E. D.  Sunday) (Indian Pioneer History Lafayette Teel) (Indian Pioneer History - I. F. Williams) (Indian Pioneer History - W. . Worley) (Frontier Trails) (Black Red And Deadly) (Picture - West of Hell's Fringe) (Picture-Outlaws and Peace Officers Of I. T.) (Hell on the Border-Harman) (Hell on the Border) (Oklahombres) (Outlaws on Horseback) (Tales of Old Fort Gibson) (The State Of Oklahoma / Its Men and Institutions) (Picture - Notable Men of Indian Territory) (Heck Thomas) (Picture-Experiences of A Deputy U.S. Marshal) (Picture - Iron Men) (Chronicles Of Oklahoma - Volume 46, 1968) (Picture - Muskogee Genealogical Society) (Oklahoma Outlaws) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)  

 

Ledbetter    

J.

T.

D.U.S. Marshal

 

Western--February 1, 1906 I. T. Western--1907

Ledbetter    

R.

F.

D.U.S. Marshal

 

March 21, 1905

Ledbetter     

James

Franklin

D.U.S. Marshal

Nowata

1897 I. T. Northern--Muskogee- January 1, 1904 I. T.

 

Retired Oklahoma Peace Officer Dies

‘Uncle Bud’ Ledbetter, 84 Had Battling Record

 

July 10, 1937—Muskogee, OK—Funeral services will be held here Saturday afternoon for J. F. “Uncle Bud” Ledbetter, 84 years old, for a half century a battling Oklahoma and Arkansas peace officer, who died Thursday night.

          The services will be held in the Muskogee civic auditorium.  Members of the United States marshal’s office and city and county officers will attend in a body.

          “Uncle Bud,” as thousands knew him retired to a farm near here in 1928 after serving since the 1890s as special officer, United States marshal, policeman and police chief in eastern Oklahoma.  He began service as a peace officer in the 1880s as an Arkansas deputy sheriff.

 

Lee, David M. was commissioned on June 7, 1889, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes.  In August of 1888, Hiram Bias gave his wife a severe whipping from which she died.  Before dying her last statement was here husband killed her.  David was summoned to Vian, Cherokee Nation, where he served a warrant of arrest to Bias, taking him to the federal jail in Ft. Smith where he stood trial.  In 1889, he arrested Will and Sam Hammons who were wanted for assault. On October 26, 1894, he was commissioned while living in Muldrow, Indian Territory.  Lee is pictured in the 1908 reunion of the U.S. Marshals at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.

(Ft. Smith Elevator - August 24, 1888) (Atoka Indian Citizen - December 14, 1889)  (Picture - The Western Peace Officer) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Lee, H. M. was commissioned at Shawnee, Oklahoma Territory from July of 1894 through December of 1895, serving under Marshal Evett Nix.  (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Lee, James B.Jim” was first commissioned on May 28, 1889, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes.  Jim Lee came to McAlester, Indian Territory in 1888, where he lived in a tent with his brother, Crockett Lee.  Shortly after locating in Indian Territory he arrived back in Ft. Smith with Marshal Carter charged with murder, Walter Hawkins, Gabe Brown, and Bill Miller charged with intent to kill, Viola Hull, Lena Miller and William Morris on charges of defrauding the federal government.  Carter killed a man named Gaines in 1887, at Tishomingo, Chickasaw Nation and had been on the scout ever since.  Miller and Brown way laid and attempted to kill George Hawkins on July 20, 1888 because he was a witness against the two in the Chickasaw courts.  In 1889, Jim worked as a posse man under his brother.  The two brothers were commissioned by Marshal J. J. Dickerson of the Eastern Texas District in Paris, Texas.   One of the reported arrests that Deputy Marshal Lee made was of James McCalle who was wanted for assault.  On June 17, 1893, Jim was commissioned while living in South McAlester, Choctaw Nation.  In 1904, Deputy Marshal Lee was appointed deputy marshal by Marshal George K. Pritchard of the Central District Indian Territory, where he was stationed at Howe, Choctaw Nation.

(Atoka Independent - May 12, 1888) (Ft. Smith Elevator - November 2, 1888) (Atoka Indian Citizen - December 28, 1889) (The Weekly Elevator - September 8, 22, 1893) (Woodward Bulletin - April 1, 1904) (Indian Pioneer History - Crockett Lee) (Indian Pioneer History - Joe Southern) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Lee, John was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes.  In October of 1888, he arrested a Negro Charles Overton, on charges of murder.  Overton shot and killed another Negro named Albert Reed near Lehigh on October 2, 1888.  Being wounded by Reed, Overton claimed Reed shot first and he killed him in self defense.  The incident occurred over a fall-out over a girl.  Overton was left suffering with a serious wound caused from a ball that entered his abdomen and lodged in his back. 

(Ft. Smith Elevator - October 26, 1888)

 

Lee, R. Crockett came to McAlester, Indian Territory in 1888, where he lived with his brother Jim Lee.  Jim Lee was a deputy marshal working out of the Western District court of Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  Crockett started working with his brother as a posse man in 1889, where he first was commissioned under the Texas Eastern Court in Paris, Texas, under Marshal J. J. Dickerson.  On July 24, 1891, Jim Crockett was commissioned under Marshal Needles, stationed at McAlester, Choctaw Nation, where Crockett continued to work as posse man.  On November 8, 1895 he was commissioned while living in South McAlester, Choctaw Nation.  In 1897, Crockett Lee was appointed deputy marshal in the Northern District Indian Territory, appointed by Marshal Leo Bennett. One of Crockett’s first important jobs came when he took part in trying to arrest the Cook gang, between the Verdigris and Arkansas Rivers, west of Muskogee.  The lawmen received word that the Cook gang was holed up in a straw pile near a house.  At daybreak, Deputy Burchfield and another deputy approached the haystack as Crockett Lee and Lem Mitchell moved toward the house.  At the house, Crockett and Lem found a gang member whom they arrested, and then they heard gunfire coming from the haystack.  As they approached the haystack they saw two outlaws running away and one of their lawmen dead.  In the fall of 1896, there were three Green boys, Arthur, Bill and Ed who lived near Collinsville.  The brothers became involved in a life of crime which started when they robbed two stores, one at Ring Gold and another at Posse Creek south of Tulsa.  About the same time two Shawnee Indians traded wives.  Milt Barker, the husband of one of the wives learned that his ex-wife had received some money from the sale of Shawnee land.  Barker approached the Green brothers, hiring them to kill his ex-wife’s new husband, George Walden.  Bill Green went to Walden’s tent asking for some food.  George Walden’s new wife fixed him some bacon and eggs.  After finishing the meal, Bill Green asked Walden to step outside of the tent to drink some whiskey with him.  As Walden stepped from the tent, Ed Green stepped from his hiding place to shoot Walden.  Bud Ledbetter and Lon Lewis were summoned to search for the Green brothers who were reported hiding along Caney Creek, in the Osage Nation.  Their search was unsuccessful but a week later the Greens turned up at their home.  Several lawmen including Lon Lewis, Bud Ledbetter, and Crockett were called to try to arrest the brothers.  During a gun battle Bill and Ed Green were killed while Brother Arthur was seriously wounded.  Arthur Green recovered from his wounds to serve five years for his part in the Walden murder.  In 1901, Lee went to the town of Bache, near McAlester where he looked for a fugitive named Dave Tatum who had jumped bond.  Scarface Jim was a noted whiskey peddler who was hard to catch and feared no person.  Any lawman knew their chances would be poor to none to go against the bad man.  Scarface and his wife traveled to McAlester, pulling a wagon load of whiskey.  Making the trip with them was a lady friend named Lou, Bowers.  Shortly after arriving in McAlester, Scarface’s wife became quite sick forcing her to return to her home in Roff, Chickasaw Nation.  Rumor quickly spread that Scarface had been killed in McAlester.  The lady friend, Lou Bowers, went to the marshal’s office in Muskogee to claim Scarface’s wagon, team and money.  Lou Bowers told the authorities that Scarface had held her captive but she worked a deal which allowed Crockett Lee to confront Scarface at a designated place to eliminate him.  Lou Bowers ended up taking everything that Scarface owned.   The marshal made a raid on the gambling houses in Haileyville arresting the proprietors and twelve gambling tables in August of 1902.  In April of 1904, Deputy Marshal Lee was appointed field deputy marshal at Claude, Indian Territory by Marshal George K. Pritchard of the Central District Indian Territory.  Lee was still alive in 1930, living at McAlester, Oklahoma.

 (The Territorial Topic - November 12, 1891) (Ft. Smith Elevator - August 15, 1902) (The Choctaw News - June 2, 1904) (Indian Pioneer History - W. S. Duncan) (Indian Pioneer History - W. F. Jones) (Indian Pioneer History - Crockett Lee) (Indian Pioneer History - Lon Lewis) (Indian Pioneer History L. A. Roberts) (Experiences of A Deputy U.S. Marshal)  (Picture - Black, Red and Deadly) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Lee

R.

Crockett

D.U.S. Marshal

July 1, 1906 to April 11, 1907

 

Peace Officer’s Rites Planned

 

August 26, 1947—McAlester, OK—Funeral services will be at 10 a.m. Tuesday in Chaney funeral home for Crockett Lee, 79,  retired peace officer.

          Rev. Ben F. Bland, Oklahoma State penitentiary Chaplin, and Rev. Frank A. Grubbs, First Christian church pastor, will officiate.  Interment will be in Oak Hill cemetery.

          Lee, a state resident since territorial days, began his career as a peace officer in 1891 when he was appointed deputy U. S. marshal.  He served for 30 years under various U. S. Marshals.

          About 19097 he took a position as special officer for the M-K-T railway.  In 1907 he was made McAlester police chief.

          After his retirement Lee turned hi attention to stock raising on his farm near Lake McAlester.

          Survivors are his wife, a daughter, Mrs. J. T. Harmon, Amarillo, Texas, and two grandchildren, Capt. Jack Harmon, U. S. Army, stationed in Germany, and Mrs. Billie Lee Shores, Tampa, Florida.

 

Lee, R. L. served in the Central District in 1895. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Lee, W. A. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Lee, W. J. was commissioned on July 17, 1894, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George J. Crump.  Deputy Marshal Lee lived in Fayetteville, Arkansas. 

(Ft Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Leech, William A. was killed while serving as deputy marshal on April 10, 1884.

(Oklahombres) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)   Killed in the line of duty.

 

Leeper, G. J. served subpoenas at the Wichita Agency on November 2, 1875, to witnesses in the Aaron Wilson murder case.  Two Comanche Indians Peat-shi, Pe-way, Lieutenant Matthew Leeper Jr. and Surgeon J. A. McCoy were notified that their presence was required by Judge Charles Parker at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  Aaron Wilson killed a Kansas man named James Harris and his twelve year old son, John near the Wichita Agency as they were traveling through Indian Territory to Texas.  Aaron Wilson was executed on April 21, 1875, when he admitted his crimes and was hung on the gallows.

 (Ft. Smith Records, Jacket #202, 1875)

 

LeFlar, Eli was commissioned on July 31, 1872, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Logan S. Roots.  Deputy Marshal LeFlar lived in Sebastian County, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oats Of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

LeFlore, LaFlore, Charles “Captain was commissioned in the Western District of Arkansas around 1882.  Charles also served with the Indian Police in the Choctaw Nation.  In November of 1879, Deputy Marshal LeFlore rode with a posse man to arrest a horse thief at Limestone Gap.  Leflore gave a warning to the thief to surrender, whose answer was a shot from his revolver.  An intense gun battle broke out in which more than twenty shots were exchanged.  The outlaw knowing the area was able to escape without injury.  On February 25, 1884, Charles was commissioned by Marshal Thomas Boles.  On December 2, 1885, he was living in Limestone Gap when he was commissioned.  On November 28, 1887, and June 13, 1889, he was commissioned by Marshal Jacob Yoes in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  In April of 1887, LeFore captured Steve Bussel who was wanted for a murder that he committed in the Chickasaw Nation.  Charles was working in the Atoka area on May 14, 1888, after returning from Judge Parker’s court in Ft. Smith, Arkansas, where he attended the trial of Gus Bogel, the killer of W. D. Morgan of McAlester.  Bogel killed Morgan at Armstrong Switch in June of 1887, by choking his victim with a strap and beating him in the face and head until he killed him.  Captain LeFlore aided Deputy Marshal Sam Sixkiller in the killing of black desperados Dick Glass and Jim Johnson.  The two outlaws were shot down when they were confronted while a third member of the gang tried to escape.  LeFlore gave chase in a running gun battle which lasted for six miles.  A year later Leflore was present when Jeff Nicolson and Black Hoyt killed Deputy Marshal Sam Sixkiller in the public street.  Officers Keyes and LeFlore returned fire which killed Jeff Nicolson.  Charles LeFlore was born in 1841 and died at the age of seventy-nine years being buried at Limestone Gap.  Charley was married to the sister of a Chickasaw Governor and Deputy Marshal James Guy who was killed in the line of duty.  Some of LeFlore’s memorabilia's were Dick Glasses pistol which was silver plated with marble handles.  Charley also had in his possession a Winchester rifle taken from one of the Dalton boys when the officers captured them. 

(Muskogee - The Indian Journal - November 8, 1879) (Ft. Smith Elevator - December 4, 25, 1885; February 12, 1886, June 6, 1888) (Atoka Independent - May 19, 1888) (The Choctaw Champion - August 19, 1898) (Indian Pioneer History - Lu Ferguson) (Indian Pioneer History - W.W. Gaither) (Indian Pioneer History - Joe Southern) (Picture - Leaders and Leading Men Of Indian Territory - Choctaws And Chickasaws) (Hell on the Border - Harman) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

LeFlore-LaFlore   

Charles

Captain

D.U.S. Marshal

Atoka

4/1/1904--1906 I. T. Central

 

LeFlore, Felix was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

LeFlore, Lewis Campbell was appointed as office deputy to the Atoka court in April of 1905, by Marshal George Pritchard of the Central District Indian Territory. Campbell also served as jailer to the Atoka jail. A forty by fifty foot brick two story building served as a jail for the Choctaw Indian police and U. S marshals.  The ground floor had three apartments.  One apartment was for the jailer and guards, the second was for the white prisoners and the third was for the colored prisoners.  The upper story had four apartments for women.  One for white women, one for colored women and restrooms for each.  The jail served until 1913.

 (The Durant Times -April 21, 1905) (The Durant Weekly - June 2, 1905) (Indian Pioneer History - Joe Southern) (Picture - Notable Men Of Indian Territory)

 

Le Flore    

L.

C.

D.U.S. Marshal

Atoka

April 1, 1904

 

LeFlore, LaForce, Newton served in the Central District in 1894.  He rode with Deputy Marshal Will Neal and five other deputy marshals to serve a warrant of arrest to Buss Luckey and Tom Root, wanted for the Blackstone and Coretta train robberies.  They received word the gang was possibly holed up in a farmhouse owned by Kizzie Lola, near the Broken Arrow settlement, south of Tulsa, Creek Nation.  In December of 1894, the deputy marshals arrived at the suspected hideout of the outlaws.  As the lawmen approached the farmhouse in heavy fog, the outlaw’s watchdogs started barking, alerting the gang.  The gang evidently knew the lawmen would be coming for them because they were found hiding in a haystack.   Running from the haystack, a running gunfight developed in which Roots and Luckey escaped.  LeFlore was found after a brief search, severely injured, lying on the ground, shot in the back.  Newton LeFlore died on December 12, 1894.  Root and Luckey were tried for Newton’s death, but with the help of a shrewd defense lawyer they were able to escape the gallows.  Their attorney used a defense that LeFlore was shot by his own posse since he was shot in the back. Luckey was acquitted of the murder charge but did receive fifteen years for the train robberies. Tom Root was later shot and killed near Cohcharty.  (Leforces’ remains were shipped to Muskogee, Indian Territory. 

(Indian Journal - December 14, 1894) (Indian Chieftain, Vinita - December 27, 1894) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Law West Of Fort Smith) (Black Red and Deadly) (Hell on the Border-Harman) (Oklahombres) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)    Killed in the line of duty.

 

LeForce, J. S. was commissioned on January 28, 1895, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George J. Crump. Deputy Marshal LeForce was living in Wagoner, Creek Nation at the time of his commission.

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

LeForce, Perry was commissioned on January 5, 1895, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George J. Crump.  Perry was living at Muskogee, Creek Nation at the time of his commission.

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

LeForce, Robert was commissioned on January 7, 1895, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, under Marshal George J. Crump.  Deputy Marshal LeForce was living in Muskogee, Creek Nation at the time of his commission. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Lehman, Charlie was remembered as a deputy marshal by Thomas Bradford Watts. 

(Indian Pioneer History - Thomas Bradford Watts)

 

Levering, George served in the Northern Judicial District in 1894. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshal, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Lewis    

A.

M.

D.U.S. Marshal

Tulsa

March 11, 1905

 

Lewis, Lon was commissioned in the Northern District Indian Territory in 1892, under Marshal Samuel Rutherford.  Deputy Lewis served in the Northern District for ten years stationed at Tulsa.  In 1895, Deputy Marshals Lon Lewis and Tom Wilson, working out of Muskogee, formed a posse consisting of Tom Wilson’s nephew, Lack Wilson and Lon Lewis’s brother S.R. Lewis to serve a warrant of arrest for “Texas Jack”, a train robber who escaped from the Muskogee jail.  A gambler whose name was not known escaped with “Texas Jack”.    A third warrant was in the lawmen’s possession for an Indian named Gube Childers who was charged with stealing cattle.  The posse arrived at Springtown during the evening to find the town celebrating a festival.  A thorough search of the town did not turn up any of the fugitives.  Around 8:00 P.M. a colored man came to the officers asking if they were looking for Gube Childers.  The lawmen were told Gube was not in town but would be there later when the dance started.  Deputy Marshal Tom Wilson arrested Gube Childers at the dance and placed him under guard for the night.  The next morning Gube refused to mount his horse to make the trip to the Muskogee jail.  Gube told the lawmen he had been tried in the Creek Indian court where he had been acquitted of the cattle rustling charges.  A large group of the town’s people gathered around the officers, holding their rifles, covering the officers.  The marshals knew they would be lucky to be able to ride away without getting killed.  N. B. Childers, Judge of the Creek Coweta District, who was standing in the group of people, told the lawmen the stolen cattle belonged to a white man who was married to a Creek Indian woman.  The Creek court did not have jurisdiction over the case.  The judge was an uncle to Gube Childers, who told Gube he would have to go with the officers.  The older Childers said he would come to Muskogee in a couple of days to give bond.  Gube Childers was taken to Muskogee where he was sentenced to three years in the federal penitentiary.  In the fall of 1896, three brothers, Arthur, Bill and Ed Green, all farm boys living with their father who was an inter-married Cherokee.  They lived on Caney River, four miles north of Collinsville. The three boys became cowboys and began to stray; their first undoing was to rob a store at Ring Gold then another store on Posey Creek, south of Tulsa.  Murder became their next crime on their agenda when they were hired to kill a Shawnee Indian, George Walden by another Shawnee, Milt Barker.  The source of trouble came when Walden and Barker traded wives.  Shortly after the trade Milt Barker found that his ex-wife had received $500 from a Shawnee land sale so he decided to have the Green brothers eliminate George Walden.  The Green brothers hired on to do the job for $250.  Bill Green went to George Walden’s tent asking for food and Waldens’ wife fixed him some eggs and bacon.  After eating Bill Green asked Walden outside, telling him he had some whiskey and wanted to talk with him.  As Walden stepped from his tent, Ed Green stepped from his hiding place killing Walden.  Brother Arthur was nursing a wound he had received during one of their robberies.  Bud Ledbetter and Lon were called to make the arrest of the brothers.  The brothers were reported to be in hiding in the eastern part of the Osage Nation along the Caney River.   A week later, the Green brothers returned to their home where they went into hiding.  Lon Lewis hired Charles McClelland, a well known Indian fighter and killer to help capture the Green brothers.  McClelland was to gain confidence from the Greens.  Charles Trainer, a man wanted for larceny, was selected to carry out the plan for leniency in his charge of cattle stealing.  Trainer went to the brothers persuading them to rob a bank with him.  Trainer met with Deputy Marshal O’Brien giving him the plan for the capture of the Green brothers.  The Green brothers rode into an ambush at Grasshopper Ford on the Verdigris River.  The lawmen divided into two parties using shotguns and rifles as firepower to stop the Greens as they rode single file down the trail.  When Trainer approached the river he rode into the deep water where he allowed his horse to drink before crossing the river.  After Trainer had crossed, Arthur Green laid down on a flat rock to drink.  Bill and Ed Green rode to the top of the bank.  Deputy Marshals Lewis, Ledbetter and McClelland came into sight giving an order to give it up.  The Greens headed for the river trying to make their escape as Lon Lewis fired at Bill Green, hitting him in the shoulder.  McClelland fired his shotgun loaded with turkey shot at Ed Green, wounding him without killing him.  Ed fell from his horse onto the flat rocks in the river where he went for his pistol.  Osborn and Crockett Lee fired from the distant bank as Bud Ledbetter fired the shot that killed Ed Green.  Smith Bushyhead shot Arthur Green through the lungs leaving him seriously wounded.  Bill and Ed Green both died from their wounds and Arthur was taken to Muskogee where he received five years for his part in the killing of George Walden.  Milt Barker also received a five year sentence for hiring the killers.  Lon Lewis was a part of the deputy marshal posse, made up of Paden Tolbert, Bud Ledbetter, Joe and Gus Thompson, John McClannahan and Jake Elliot which captured the Al Jennings Gang in 1897.  Lon was born in 1867, served in the Texas Rangers, then came to Indian Territory in 1894. 

(The Antlers Democrat - January 26, 1900)  (Indian Pioneer History - Lon Lewis) (Indian Pioneer History - Chauncey Moore) (West of Hell’s Fringe) (Oklahombres) (Tales of Atoka Heritage) (Iron Men) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Lewis, William H. was commissioned on August 10, 1893, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George J. Crump.  Deputy Marshal Lewis killed Charley Strickland who was charged with the murder of Deputy Marshal Bill Lewis.  William Lewis was living at Lyolte, Boone County, Arkansas at the time of his commission. 

(Indian Pioneer History - J. T. French) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Lidell, Charles was summoned to arrest A. J. Q. Crews in 1895.  Crews was having a hard time making a living for his wife and himself so he took a job away from home selling insurance.  His young and beautiful wife found a job working for a ranch family near Gainesville, Texas, for her board and keep, and his when he was at home.  When Crews returned home, Mrs. Crews told him her boss, Mr. Murrell, was annoying her trying to make love to her at every opportunity.  Crews hid in the barn to see for himself what was going on.  When the farmer came out before daylight to feed the stock and Mrs. Crews came out to feed the cows, the farmer started making passes at her.  Crew, seeing what was going on, came out from behind the corn crib where he had been hiding and a fight began.  Crews was getting the best of it when Murrell yelled to his wife “Bring me my gun!”  She came with the gun, a .30-30 Winchester rifle.  All three struggled for possession of the gun.  In the tussle the gun went off and accidentally killed Mrs. Murrell.  The next shot fired killed the farmer.  Crews knew he had to make a run for his life and being out of money he took the farmers money and pocketbook, saddled one of his horses and was just leaving when the farmer’s boy came to the barn.  Another fight started, so Crews killed him, too.  The departure from the farm was at a very fast pace which ended when the horse gave out and he took it afoot.

Not long after a reward had been posted, a chicken peddler, one of those covered wagon type of peddlers who went through the countryside selling tin wares and thread to farm wives in return for chickens, eggs, or whatever, for payment.  The Peddler quickly recognized him and ordered him to halt.  When Crews paid very little attention to him the peddler shot him with an old shot gun loaded with birdshot, which only penetrated his clothes at that distance.  Crews returned the fire.  He killed the peddler.  At the next village he was again confronted by several men who tried to arrest him, so he killed one of them.  He then boarded a train, escaping into Indian Territory where he killed Henry Freeman, a posse man.  Crews finally awoke to what had happened to him so he decided to return to the scene of the crime.  Meanwhile word had gotten out that he was on the train and when it made a stop at Thackerville, the law was waiting for him.  He got off the train and ordered some food and placed his gun on the table beside him.  As he ate, the officers closed in on all sides and Deputy Marshal Charles Lidell, Indian Territory arrested him.  Crews was taken to Denton, Texas, where he was hung. 

(Old West Magazine - Fall, 1975 Page. 49)

 

Lilly, Jesse B. was commissioned at Anadarko, Oklahoma Territory from July 1894 through December of 1895, serving under Marshal Evett Nix.  (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Lilly, Thomas Earnest served as deputy marshal for twelve years.  Deputy Marshal Lilly was commissioned on November 19, 1891, by Marshal Jacob Yoes and June 14, 1893, by Marshal George J. Crump, in the Western District of Arkansas.  In this time period he also worked out of the Kansas federal court at Wichita, Kansas.  In November of 1892, Lilly came in from Otoe, near Ponca, bringing nearly a score of Indians charged with selling liquor.  The Indians were at their camp dancing the “Messiah Dance” joined by the Osage, Ponca and Iowa.  One peculiarity of the dance craze was that the braves abandoned their squaws and as soon as another squaw arrived on the scene they would marry another.  Deputy Marshal Lilly brought in Henry Horn, Carroll Luna and Lum Lutrell who were wanted for illicit distilling in Eastern Arkansas.  Deputy Marshals Gene Morris from Ryan and Tom Lilly of Chickasha, were summoned to arrest Brigham Young who killed Bill Paul.  Bill Paul was drinking when he came into a cafe late at night and walked toward the back of the building.  In the cafe were Bob Holt and Brigham Young who held bad feeling toward Bill Paul.  Bob Holt, standing in the front of the cafe saw Paul enters the cafe and followed him toward the back of the building.   When Brigham Young saw Paul and Holt approaching him he told Holt to stop so he could face the approaching Bill Paul.  Holt saw Paul go for his gun and yelled at Brigham Young to watch out.  Paul continued to move and jerk his arm as Young cleared leather with his own revolver.  One shot rang out as Bill Paul fell to the floor mortally wounded.  After the shooting Bob Holt found Paul’s gun not to be in his holster but lying in a coal barrel where it had fallen.  Evidently the gun had hung up in Paul’s holster which prevented him from making his draw.  Bob Holt and Brigham Young were turned released without any sentence for their act. 

(The Kingfisher Times - November 3, 1892) (Marietta Monitor - July 15, 1898) (Indian Pioneer History - Jack Bedford) (Indian Pioneer History - Bob Holt) (Indian Pioneer History - P.A. Jermaine) (Indian Pioneer History - A. J. Johnson) (Indian Pioneer History - A. A. Lambert) (Picture - Notable Men of Indian Territory) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Lillie-Lilly

T.

E.

D.U.S. Marshal

January 29, 1898

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lilly        

Thomas

Earnest

D.U.S. Marshal

March 21, 1905

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lilly, Tillman was commissioned on June 14, 1890, under Marshal W. C. Grimes assigned to Guthrie, Oklahoma Territory.  In 1891, Deputy Marshals Lilly and Ed Short captured Creek Outlaw, Captain Billey.  Billey was left at the Sac & Fox Agency from where he escaped.  In November of 1891, Deputy Marshal George Thornton pursued Billey until he was killed by the outlaw.  In 1892, Marshal William Grimes summoned Lilly with the rest of his staff to protect the court. Judge Dale declared war on the Doolin Gang which resulted in a death threat letter from Bill Doolin.  In March of 1894, the Panhandle Express train came into Waynoka, transporting thirteen deputy marshals, which included Tillman Lilly.  The train also carried the officer’s horses and firearms.  Bill Dalton and Dynamite Dick had been spotted at Ft. Supply traveling along the trail toward the southeast.  It was suspected that the gang was headed to Chimney Creek, twelve miles north of Waynoka.  See: Deputy Marshal Red Lucas for additional information about Captain Lilly. 

(The Territorial Topic- November 5, 1891) (The Taloga Tomahawk - March 8, 1894) (Fairview Republican - March 24, 1905) (Guardian of the Law) (West Of Hell’s Fringe) (Experience Of A U.S. Deputy Marshal) (Indian Pioneer History - Clyde Stanley Hyde) (Shoot from the Lip) (Picture- Heck Thomas) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)     Killed in the line of duty.

 

Lilly, Tillman B. was commissioned in Oklahoma Territory from July through December of 1894, serving under Marshal Evett Nix.

 (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Lindley, M. M. was appointed in March of 1901, as office deputy by Marshal Benjamin Hackett who was over the Central District Indian Territory.  Deputy Marshal Lindley was assigned to South McAlester.

(The Antlers Democrat - April 12, 1901)

 

Lindsay, E. F. served in the Northern Judicial District in 1895.  He was commissioned again on January 15, and July 3, 1896, serving under Marshal Samuel Rutherford, while living in Holdenville, Indian Territory. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshal, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Lindsay    

E.

F.

D.U.S. Marshal

Holdenville, I. T.

July 1, 1896

 

Lindsey, Seldon T. worked out of the federal court in the Eastern District, at Paris, Texas and the Western District court in Ft. Smith, Arkansas, holding a commission of deputy marshal from 1890 to 1902.  Most of the warrants assigned to him were in the Chickasaw Nation.  Seldon Lindsey went to serve a warrant of arrest to a cane broker and bootlegger named Barber who chose to resist arrest.  Barber’s decision cost him his life as he was killed during a brief gunfight.  Jesse McDonald, of Berwyn, Chickasaw Nation, killed his business partner, P.P. Barber in November of 1890 and fled to Louisiana.   Selden pursued him trying to make an arrest which ended in a gun battle leaving McDonald dead.   In October of 1891, Deputy Marshal Lindsey served a warrant of arrest to W. E. Penton for the murder of Jim Smith, whom he killed four miles west of Wynnewood, Chickasaw Nation.   In the same month, Seldon arrested Jacob Saulsman who was also charged with murder.  In October of 1891, a man named Meek, and his son Jim, came to Seldon’s home to turn themselves in for killing their neighbor, J. H. Slaughter.   Jim Meek told Seldon he was sitting in his doorway reading the paper when J. H. Slaughter approached him and shot at him, striking a log nearby.  Meek picked up his Winchester rifle as he ran toward his father’s house.  Slaughter followed Jim Meek to the house, firing at him during his pursuit.  Meek stopped running, turned, then dropped to his knee, took deadly aim and fired his rifle.   Meek fired three shots, one of the rounds hit Slaughter, killing him instantly.  The father and son were taken by Seldon Lindsey to federal court in Paris, Texas to stand trial.  On January 20, 1894, Lindsey was appointed by Marshall J. S. Williams to serve in the Eastern District, assigned to work the Chickasaw and Choctaw Nations.  In 1895, Lindsey headed a posse to trail several train robbers near Eufaula, Creek Nation.  The posse out maneuvered the bandits and set up an ambush which the robbers rode into when they stopped to set up camp.  Three of the outlaws were killed during the ambush.  On September 25, 1895, Seldon rode with Deputy Marshals Loss Hart, Ed Roberts, and W. H. Glover near Ardmore, where they killed William Dalton, a member of the Bill Doolin Gang.  Over the course of time there has been a lot of controversy on who fired the fatal shot that killed Bill Dalton.  Both Loss Hart and Lindsey laid claim to the deed.  Perhaps one of Lindsey’s most important captures was made in May of 1896, when he brought in Bill Anderson alias “Choctaw Bill”.  For three years he had dared lawmen to try to arrest him for the robbery and murder that he had committed three years earlier on August 4, 1894, when he killed a white man named Charlie Beckman, in Sippio, Choctaw Nation.  In 1901, near Mill Creek, Seldon was one of four lawmen who scoured the country side west of Ardmore to locate a band of ten thieves.  When the robbers were confronted, they saw their numbers were greater than the lawmen so they decided to shoot it out with them.  During the gun battle, a bullet grazed the back of Lindsey's neck.  Despite his injury Seldon returned fire killing thief, Bill Hutchins.  (The Territorial Topic - October 28, November 5, 1891) (Ralph Evans - File #1161, Ardmore Library) (Western Badmen) (Gunman’s Territory) (Encyclopedia of A Western Gun-Fighter) (Selden Lindsey) (West of Hell’s Fringe) (Outlaws and Peace Officers of I. T.) 

 

Lindsey 

Seldon

T.

D.U.S. Marshal

January 29, 1898

 

Linigar, Andrew was commissioned on May 12, 1892, in the Western District Court at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Linton

Thomas

April 12, 1905

 

Miamian Indorsed For U. S. Marshal

 

January 6, 1929—Miami, OK—Thomas Linton, Miami automobile salesman and leader in American Legion affairs, was indorsed for deputy United States marshal under Grant Victor, newly appointed marshal, by the Young Men’s Republican club of Ottawa County at the organization’s first meeting since the November election.  The club also indorsed Victor for a permanent appointment.

          Three postmasters were indorsed for reappointment.  They are L. B. McWilliams of Miami, James Elliott of Fairland and Clelland Hudspeth of Afton.         A copy of the resolution was sent to United States Sen. W. B. Pine.

 

Lirdly    

M.

M.

D.U.S. Marshal

South McAlester

April 22, 1899

 

Little, W.  E. "Bill” worked out of the Muskogee court where he normally worked with Deputy Marshal Ramey.  In March of 1890, the two deputy marshals made arrests of several men who were cutting trees in Indian Territory without a permit.  Little and Ramey also arrested three men named Bussel, Cochran and Ketchum who were running a crooked whiskey business in the territory.  In May of 1890, the two deputy marshals arrested three white men that were introducing whiskey into Indian Territory.  In October of 1898, Deputy Marshal Little formed a posse to capture Creek outlaw, John Watko.  Watko’s gang was trailed to a log cabin near Muskogee where they were in hiding.  Officer Little positioned his posse around the log cabin and started advancing toward the cabin.  The leery outlaws spotted the lawmen and started firing at them while the officers were at a long distance away.  The posse continued to approach the cabin until they got near enough to position themselves to fight their battle.  Thirty caliber steel jacket bullets were used in the officer’s rifles which penetrated the logs of the outlaw’s cabin.  One of the bullets that came through the logs struck John Watko, killing him.  Seeing their gang leader killed and the danger they were in, two of the outlaws surrendered while three others made their escape.  The prisoners were taken to the Muskogee District court where they stood trial.  John Watko had been under the sentence of death for over a year for the murder of James Deere.  His trial was held in the Creek Indian court where he had been tried and given a death sentence to be executed by a firing squad.  The day before he was to be executed, Watko was allowed to escape his punishment.  Watko drafted several bad men to form his gang who specialized in stealing cattle and robbing businesses. 

(Atoka Indian Citizen March 29, April 26, May 17, 1890) (Ft. Smith Elevator - May 9, 1890; January 31, 1891) (Marietta Monitor - October 28, 1898) (Indian Pioneer History - Joe Southern) (Indian Pioneer History - Julius P. Ward)

 

Little  

W.

E.

Bill

D.U.S. Marshal

April 1, 1898

 

Lively, J. P. was commissioned on July 1, 1896, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  Deputy Marshal Lively lived in Claremore, Cherokee Nation.

 (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Lively      

J. (T.)

P.

D.U.S. Marshal

Claremore, I. T.

July 1, 1896

 

Lively, P. J. was commissioned on February 3, 1896, while living in Oolagah, Indian Territory. 

(Ft. Smith Oaths of Office)

 

Locke, B .B. was appointed field deputy marshal in April of 1904, assigned to Talihina, by Marshal George K. Pritchard of the Central District. 

(The Choctaw News - June 2, 1904)

 

Locke W. R. served in the Northern Judicial District in 1895 and 1896. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshal, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Locke    

William

R.

D.U.S. Marshal

Miami

February 20, 1897

 

Lockert, Lockett, Ed rode with Deputy Marshal Fred Hudson of Weatherford in November of 1902, to capture feared outlaws Bert Casey and Jim Sims.  The two deputies trailed the outlaws for six weeks trying to make a surprise capture.  The outlaws ended their day’s travel near Cleo Springs where they made camp.  During the darkness of the evening the two outlaws were resting around the campfire when the two deputies rushed them, forcing a close fight.  Ten shots were fired within seconds, with the parties not being over four feet apart.  Jim Sims pulled his pistol but when the trigger was pulled it would not fire. Bert Casey and Jim Sims were both killed during the gunfight.  A $5000 reward was paid for Bert Casey who was wanted “Dead-Or-Alive”.  Deputy Marshal Bob Hutchins reported another version of the Bert Casey - Jim Sims incident.  In the book Gunman’s Territory, he said both Weston Fred Hudson and Ed Lockett were members of the Casey gang, doing time in the federal jail and were given a portion of the reward and clemency for their crimes.  Fred Casey was the chief figure in the arrest due the killing of Anadarko sheriff Smith and the son of Dr. Beanblossom in Caddo County.  He mentioned two notorious outlaws Jim Moran and Simms from Chickasaw country.  Deputy Marshals Jim Bourland and Jim Thompson selected the brother-in-law of Jim Hughes, another gang member to be a spotter for the marshals.  Casey, Simms and Jim Hughes became wise to the brother-in-law, took him down to the creek bank and hung him.  This lynching caused Simms to become afraid, making him want to quit the gang.  Fred Hudson had enough courage for both of them and he persuaded Lockett to be careful and stay put.  Hudson tried to persuade Casey to rescue Jim Moran and several other Bert Casey gang members who were in jail at Lawton.  Casey went along with the idea but Simms reminded them they needed money which all parties agreed would be the next step.  The foursome went to Cleo Springs where they spent several days casing the bank, preparing to make the robbery.  Hudson told Lockett they had to kill Casey and Simms before the bank robbery because they could not take the chance of Casey being killed in the bank robbery.  All reward money would be forfeited in that event.  Early the next morning, Hudson and Lockett cleaned their guns and were twirling them to limber their wrists.  Casey and Simms cleaned, checked and returned their guns to their holsters.  A command to raise his hands was given to Casey who pondered a moment before going for his gun.  As he made his move he was struck by Hudson’s bullet sending him reeling to the ground.  Out of the corner of Hudson’s eye he caught a glimpse of Simms drawing his gun on a frozen Lockett.  The second bullet from Hudson’s pistol killed Simms instantly and at this instant the mortally wounded Casey made his last attempt to kill Hudson firing a shot that went wild as he fell to his death.

(Woodward Bulletin - November 14, 1902) (Cleo Chieftain - November 14, 1902) (Gunman’s Territory)

 

Logan, The Arkansas Gazette recorded the death of Deputy Marshal Logan who died on July 1, 1875. 

(Arkansas Gazette Obituaries - 1879)

 

Logan, J. F. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Logan, M. P. was commissioned in the Western District of Arkansas in 1894. 

(Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Logan, Mose L. was commissioned on July 9, 1894 and July 1, 1896, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George J. Crump.  Deputy Marshal Logan was living in Fort Smith, Arkansas during his commission.

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Logan 

Robert

D.U.S. Marshal

Wister

August 18, 1913

 

Logue, Bud in July of 1895 raided Brown’s hut, east of Violet Springs, trying to capture the Christian Gang.  During the raid, Deputy Marshal Logue captured Doc Williams and Jessie Findlay who helped the Christians and four others to escape jail.  The band of outlaws killed Sheriff Will Turner when they escaped from jail. 

 (West of Hell’s Fringe) (Southern District Court - Purcell; April Term, 1896)

 

Logue, William was commissioned on July 10, 1890, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes.  Ft. Smith (Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Long, A. J. arrested four men that were charged with assaulting Betsy Beldridge in December of 1904.  Robert Foreman, Frank Coursey, Miles Chastain and Butch Canley were taken to the Vinita jail where they were held until they stood trial for the charge.  Penalty for the crime was death or life imprisonment.  On March 11, 1906, Deputy Marshal Long of Vinita was notified to take three deputies to the Spavinaw Hills where the Wickliffe gang had killed three deputy marshals, Gilstrap, Terry and Tittle. The posse was still engaged in a gun battle with the Cherokee gang when Long was summoned.  After the battle with the Wickliffe's, Deputy Marshals Long and Charles Wheat captured four prisoners, Jim and Lewis Wickliffe uncles of the Wickliffe Gang, Peter Wolfe, and Rain Crowe, who were charged with harboring fugitives.  In May of 1906, Long was working with Than Wooford and Andy Dick when they arrested Ben Hungry, ten miles east of Pryor Creek.  Hungry was charged with the murder of Deputy Marshal Gilstrap.  Hungry was wearing the hat that Andy Dick lost when he was ambushed while riding with Gilstrap.  This lent credence to the fact that Hungry was with the Wickliffe gang.  Hungry confessed to taking part in the ambush but placed the blame of Gilstrap’s murder and the robbing of his body on John Wickliffe. 

(The Putnam Pioneer - January 20, 1905) (Woodward Bulletin - January 27, 1905) (The Bennington Tribune - March 15, 22, May 24, 1906)

 

Long, George F.  Deputy U. S. Marshal

 

G. F. Long, 65, Retired Peace Officer, Dies

 

November 2, 1947—The Oklahoman—George Frank Long, 65, early day Oklahoma peace officer and former deputy U. S. marshal, was stricken fatally by a heart ailment shortly after 10 a.m. Friday in his Kingfisher home.  He had been ill two months.

          A native of Caldwell, Kansas, Long moved to Kingfisher with his parents near the turn of the century.  He played as a member of the famous Kingfisher college football team which marked up one-sided victories over major central and southwestern universities in 1903, 1904 and 1905.

          In 1911 he became under sheriff of Kingfisher County.  Three years later, he was elected sheriff and served three consecutive terms.  It was during his first term as sheriff that Long gained national recognition for his investigation of the murder of Fred Trow, Kingfisher County farmer.

          Long first retired three years after he was appointed deputy U. S. marshal in 1925.  He was asked to return to federal duty, however, as a guard during the Charles F. Urschel kidnapping trial.  He went back into retirement after the trial, but during World War II he became a civilian guard at Tinker field and won several awards ruing his 4-year stay there.

          Long is survived by his wife, Dell Long of Kingfisher; two sons, Sam of Kingfisher and Pete Long, 2504 NW 32, who is band director at Central high school; a daughter, Mrs. Monroe Darragh, Hobart; a brother, John Long, Kingfisher, and four grandchildren.

          Funeral services were not yet arranged late Saturday.

 

Long, John F. was commissioned on June 25, 1898, in the Northern District of Indian Territory serving under Marshal W. H. Darrough.  Long was still alive in 1930, living at Tahlequah, Oklahoma.

(File #10, Indian Library, Oklahoma Historical Library)

 

Long    

John

F.

D.U.S. Marshal

March 21, 1905

 

Long, Lee served in the Central District in 1894.

 (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Long, W. E. was commissioned on September 10, 1894, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George J. Crump.  Deputy Marshal Long was living in Fayetteville, Arkansas during his commission.

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Longbone, Silas was commissioned on February 11, 1895, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George J. Crump.  Silas lived in Nowata, Osage Nation. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Longbone, Cyrus was assigned to the Bartlesville District.  During the fall of 1895, Deputy Marshal Longbone helped arrest outlaw Bill Raidler on Caney Creek, north of Bartlesville.

 (Heck Thomas) (West Of Hell’s Fringe)

 

Lord, Sam was stationed at Oklahoma City.  Deputy Marshal Lord was mentioned in Indian Pioneer History. 

(Indian Pioneer History - M.S. Crismore)

 

Louderback, J. H. 

(Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Love, Edward was commissioned as deputy marshal in the Southern District Court of Indian Territory, at Paris, Texas, working in the Chickasaw Nation.  The deputy marshal was appointed around 1894, working less that one year when he was killed in 1894.  Love followed a horse thief across the Red River into Texas, where they had a confrontation.  The two men’s fate hinged on who was the quickest on the draw.  Edward Love’s fate was sealed on that day. 

(Indian Pioneer History - George Lloyd Poston) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)    K

 

Love, Jack E. was born in June of 1857, in Texas.  Jack Love came to Oklahoma Territory a few days after the opening of the strip in 1889.  Love served as sheriff for Woodward also holding a commission as deputy marshal.  In the fall of 1893, Love was placed over the Woodward District by Marshal Evett Nix.  Jack Love was a friend to lawyer, Temple Houston, the son of famous Samuel Houston.  Temple Houston was at odds with the Jennings brothers, John and Ed, which ended in a bad scene.  An argument starting in the court room continued to a saloon, where Temple Houston and his friend, ex Woodward sheriff Jack Love became involved in a gunfight with the brothers.  During the fight fifteen to twenty shots were fired causing the room to fill with smoke.  The room went dark as the lights were extinguished by the rapid succession of the firing of the pistols. Flashes from the weapons as they were fired became the targets for the gunfighters.  After the smoke cleared and the room was illuminated, Ed Jenning lay dead on the floor with two bullet holes in his head.  John Jennings was shot in the left shoulder which would surely take his arm.  Houston and Love were unhurt.  Temple Houston and Jack Love immediately surrendered themselves to the local law.  Due to this event, Al and Frank Jennings, the brothers of Ed and John Jennings, formed a gang making several attempts on the lives of Jack Love and Temple Houston.  The Jennings and O’Malley gang lasted only five month, not being very successful.  In May of 1895, the Bill Doolin gang robbed a passenger train near Dover, Oklahoma Territory.  Marshal Evett Nix was notified immediately after the train robbery.  The marshal sent Deputy Marshals Chris Madsen, J. S. Prather and Bill Banks by railway to the scene of the accident.  Within a short time the deputy marshals confronted the gang which was headed toward Woodward.  The gang traveled twelve to fifteen miles east of Woodward where they decided to lay low for a few days.  Three of the gang members, Bitter Creek Newcomb, Charlie Pierce, and “Little Bill” Raidler rode into Woodward to case the town for a robbery.  After spending an afternoon in the town, the trio rode two or three miles outside of the town where they planned their next robbery.  The three decided they could pull off the robbery without any help from the rest of the gang. After darkness, the three outlaws rode back to Woodward where they robbed the express office of $6,500.  The express agent was bound and gagged to keep him from reporting the robbery.  It was the next morning before Deputy Marshal Jack Love and a posse knew of the robbery.  The outlaws were able to get too much of a lead for the posse to catch them.  In November of 1897, Jack Love was on a passenger train that departed from Shawnee.  Jack Love was looking out of the window when a man standing beside a box car, along the tracks, fired a shot at him.  The shot barely missed his head with the slug hitting the ventilator in the top of the car.  Jack tried to get off the train to capture the, would be assailant, but the train was moving too fast for him to jump.  The gunshot was believed to have come from the Jennings gang. 

(West of Hell’s Fringe) (Picture - West of Hell’s Fringe) (Shoot from the Lip) (West Wind Views) (Outlaws on Horseback) (Picture-Oklahombres) (The Advocate -September 29, 1893, March 9, 1894) (Woodward Jeffersonian - September 30, 1893) (The Woodward News - October 11, 1895) (The Woodward News - November 19, 1897)

 

Love, Press transported convicted murder Wesley Wright who was charged with the killing of a man named Curtis in 1895.  In June of 1895, Wright was in the Lansing penitentiary, where he was given a new trial to be held in Kingfisher. 

(The Woodward News - April 2, 1896)

 

Love, Robert H. was commissioned on May 24, 1869, in the Van Buren District Court, serving under Marshal William A. Britton.  Robert Love tried to arrest a Chickasaw freedman who was wanted on a murder charge.  The freedman resisted arrest which resulted in Deputy Marshal Love shooting and killing him.  Robert Love was arrested and placed in federal jail.  The Chickasaw governor attempted to have Love released but the federal court stated the Indian Nation did not have a binding force against the federal court.  President Andrew Jackson was asked to make a ruling on the case.  President Jackson would not make a ruling; instead he turned the matter over to the Attorney General William Evarts who left the case under federal control.  The Chickasaw Nation was supposed to extend citizenship to its ex-slaves which it failed to do.  Therefore the freedman killed by Robert Love was not a Chickasaw citizen leaving the Chickasaw court without any jurisdiction.  Robert Love was a Chickasaw Indian living in the Chickasaw Nation.  Robert Love lived in Van Buren when he was first commissioned then moved to Pickens County, in the Chickasaw Nation. 

(Indian Territory And The United States, 1866-1906) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office)

 

Love, Robert H. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  He was a Negro deputy marshal. 

(Black Red and Deadly) (The Western Peace Officer) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Lowe, W. S. arrested Henry Gourley of Table Mountain, Chickasaw Nation, in August of 1885.  Gourley killed Frank Cook, on May 8, 1889.  In September of 1889, Deputy Marshal Lowe arrested Sallie Sanders, a Negro woman, charged with killing her new born baby by crushing its skull.  In October of 1889, a man named Ireton surrendered to Deputy Marshal Lowe.  Ireton was charged with the murder of Richard Brennan, which occurred 35 miles south of the Washita River, south of Purcell. 

(The Territorial Topic - August 15, September 12, 19, 26, October 10, 24, 1889)

 

Lowell, Lovell, H. P. was commissioned on March 30, 1886, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal John Carroll. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Lowery, Charles B. was commissioned at Ponca City, Oklahoma Territory from July of 1894 through June of 1895.

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Lowery, F. R. was commissioned in the Northern District in September of 1902, serving under Marshal Darroughs. 

(Ft. Smith Elevator - September 12, 1902)

 

Lowery       

Henry

B.

D.U.S. Marshal

October 21, 1918 to June 30, 1919

 

Lowery, O .B. was commissioned in Oklahoma Territory from July of 1895 through December of 1895, serving under Marshal Evett Nix. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Loy, Elwood was commissioned on August 1, 1893, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George J. Crump.  Deputy Marshal Loy was living in Fayetteville, Arkansas during his commission. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Lubbes, William A. “Gus” served as jailer for the Western District of Arkansas, starting in October of 1896.  Jailer Lubbes witnessed the hanging of K. B. Brooks.  On October 28, 1897, K. B. Brooks raped and assaulted a young girl.  The girl was the daughter of a man that he worked for in Hudson, Indian Territory.  Brooks was captured by Bud Ledbetter and taken to Ft. Smith, Arkansas, where he went to the gallows. 

(Indian Pioneer History - William Herring) (Picture - Hell on the Border) (Picture - Notable Men Of Indian Territory) (Picture - Muskogee Genealogical Society) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)               

 

Lubus, Gus was commissioned in the Northern District Indian Territory in 1897. He was appointed by Marshal Leo Bennett in Muskogee.  (Experience Of A U.S. Deputy Marshal)

 

Lucas, Edward L. U. S. Marshal

 

Former Tulsa Chief Died

 

December 3, 1919—Tulsa—Edward L. Lucas, former chief of police here, and a United States marshal of the northern district during Indian Territory days, is dead at Baxter Springs, Kansas, so word received here says.  He died following an operation.

 

Lucas, Frank served in the Northern Judicial District in 1894. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshal, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Lucas, Orrington “Red” was commissioned deputy marshal in 1882, in the Western District of Arkansas.   Lucas’ first assignment from Judge Parker was to keep watch over the stagecoach line between Ft. Smith and Muskogee. Judge Parker knew Red Lucas’ strong suit was his ability to investigate and plan.  The deputy found several men living between Big and Little Vian whom he felt were robbing the stage.  Deputy Marshal Heck Thomas assisted Lucas in serving the warrants. This ended all of the stage hold ups in that area.  In February of 1893, Red was sent to help Marshal Evett Nix of Oklahoma Territory to identify the members of the Bill Doolin gang.  Bill Doolin was playing havoc with the marshal’s forces causing embarrassment to them.  The newspapers were making a hero out of Bill Doolin.  It seemed every time the deputy marshals tried to capture the Doolin gang they were one step behind.  Red Lucas employed the ugliest man that he could find to serve as his partner while investigating the Doolin gang.  The two set up camp thirty-five miles northwest of Ingalls, on Black Bear Creek where they posed as fishermen.  Red and his friend made regular trips to Ingalls where they sold their fish to the outlaws.  The gang members gave it to the owners of the saloon and restaurant that catered to them.  After being accepted and gaining trust of the gang, Red set up a tent in a vacant lot next to the saloon.  Bill Doolin returned from a raid in Arkansas, where he received a wound on his foot and head.  Medical attention was not available for Bill Doolin because he had a $2,500 reward on his head, “Dead or Alive.”  This was the break that Red Lucas had been waiting for.   Lucas’ knowledge in handling wounds made Doolin obligated to him.  The wound to Doolin’s foot left him permanently lame, while the bullet was left lodged in his skull because it could be life threatening.  On September 1, 1893, the time was right to capture Bill Doolin and his gang.  Red Lucas contacted the marshal’s force to proceed with a plan to capture the gang.  Eleven officers were summoned from the eastern district at Stillwater and eleven officers came from Guthrie.   Two covered wagons were used to conceal the deputy marshals.  The deputy marshals traveled to the outskirts of the town and were in the process of surrounding the town when the gang learned of their involvement.  Outlaw Dynamite Dick quickly suspected Red Lucas and Catfish Jack as their betrayers and he decided to eliminate them.  Bill Doolin stepped in to stop Dynamite Dick because he didn’t agree with him.  The fast thinking Red Lucas attacked Catfish Jack knocking him to the ground, where he continued punching him until he knocked him unconscious.  With the heat off, Red Lucas made his way to the livery stable where he was to meet the marshal to make the plan of attack. Feared outlaw, Bitter Creek Newcomb, took cover at the town well when Officer Tom Houston shot him in the leg.  Bitter Creek shot back immediately striking Houston’s hat, just missing his head.  At the same instant a shot came from the upstairs window of the hotel, which passed through Houston’s stomach.  In a split second, a second slug tore through Houston’s stomach again in the same area.  As the critically wounded Houston sank to the ground he said, “I would like to see the man that shot me.”  A third shot came from the hotel window which fell Deputy Marshal Lafe Shadley, then another shot rang out which dropped a curious thirteen year old boy who was an innocent bystander.  By this time the wounded Bitter Creek made his way to a cornfield south of town.  Bill Dalton mounted his horse, hoping to find an outlet in the wire fence, four and one-half blocks northwest of the saloon.  A surge of gunfire from the officers pelted around Dalton and his mount, hitting him under the arm, before striking his horse on the leg.  Bill Doolin, seeing his second in command in an adverse situation, picked up the wounded Dalton as he passed by.  Most of the marshal’s force was compelled to take cover as the lone outlaw in the upper hotel window continued to blaze away.  Officer Dick Speed from Perkins made a move to try to gain an advantage point on the gunman in window, knowing something had to be done before he killed more of the marshals’ force.  Dick Speed’s move proved to be fatal as he became the new target.  A slug tore into Speed’s body which forced him to the ground where he tried to continue to crawl to safety.  The wounded lawman crawled nearly a hundred yards as five bullets were shot at him before he was killed.  The leading Deputy Marshal, John Hixon, realized the only way to stop the gunman was to use dynamite.  The lady who owned the hotel came outside of her establishment with her three small children when she became aware that her hotel was targeted.  Hixon told the lady her hotel was going to be blown up but she could save it if she could talk the outlaw in the upstairs part to come down.  The lady persuaded the gunman, Roy Daugherty, alias” “Arkansas Tom” alias “Tom Jones” to surrender.  Deputy Marshal Lucas took “Arkansas Tom” to the dying Tom Houston showing him the man who shot him, giving Houston his death wish.  “Arkansas Tom” was the only outlaw from the “Battle of Ingalls” to be arrested.  Red Lucas and fifteen other deputy marshals, under the charge of Captain Lillie, traveled to Alva by train, then headed southwest to the Gloss Mountains. The posse found one member of the Doolin gang in a dugout near Chimney Rock.  Lucas entered the dugout where he had a row with the outlaw.  The fight came to an abrupt end when Red sank his Bowie knife into the outlaw’s neck.  Another man called Flatnose was arrested but released for the lawmen felt he was not involved.  They learned later the outlaw known as Flatnose had a $1000 reward on his head.  Red specialized in capturing horse thieves.  Red helped to break up a band of outlaws that stole horses and used the profits to purchase whiskey, which was in great demand in Indian Territory.  In 1889, Red played an active role in the Land Rush of Oklahoma Territory, working all of the rushes.  Guthrie was the wildest rush, which Red worked with his twin brother Worrington Lucas.  Red remained in Guthrie until 1895.  Bob Dalton served as a deputy marshal in his early years, often riding with Red Lucas.  Red was well familiar with William Dalton, a brother to the Dalton gang and member of the Bill Doolin gang.  Red always felt that William Dalton was never killed but fabricated his own death.   William Dalton collected the reward, then moved to California with his wife.  Deputy Marshal Lucas served as deputy marshal giving forty years of service until retiring in 1902.   Red Lucas was born in 1858 and was still alive in 1930, living at Wagoner, Oklahoma. 

(Indian Pioneer History - W. F. Jones) (Indian Pioneer History - Orrington “Red” Lucas) (Bill Doolin O. T.) (Experiences of A U.S.

Deputy Marshal) (Outlaws on Horseback) (Tales Of Old Fort Gibson) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List shows Orrington Lusac, which is in error)

 

Luce, Will was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Luman, J. H. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Lund, Alfred was one of the officers selected to capture the Ben Cravens gang.  Ben Craven started his career as a bootlegger along the Kansas Line, later he robbed stores, and he stole cattle in Osage country.  During a robbery, he killed a man named Alva Bateman at Red Hook and Deputy sheriff Johnson of Pawnee County who attempted to arrest him.  Deputy Marshal Frank Canton arrested Cravens, taking him to jail in Perry.  Cravens broke jail and released all of the prisoners.  Ben Cravens became one of the most sought after outlaws in Oklahoma Territory.  The outlaw was continually confronted by the lawmen.  Cravens fought many duels with the marshals but always managed to escape from them.  Craven’s luck ran out when he was with gang member Dick Ainsey, near Blackwell, where they planned to rob a bank.  Several deputy marshals surrounded a cabin where the two outlaws were hiding. In a shoot-out, Deputy Marshal Lund shot Dick Ainsey in the heart, killing him instantly.  Ben Cravens was shot twice before surrendering to the officers.  Cravens was taken to Lansing, Kansas to serve a fifteen year sentence in the Lansing penitentiary, starting on January 18, 1897.  The Kansas penitentiary did not hold Cravens for on November 16, 1900, Joe Ezell, a notorious robber and Cravens manufactured pistols, made of wood which were wrapped in foil to fool the prison guards into believing they were real.  It was not long that Cravens was back in the Osage Nation where he continued his life of crime.  Cravens was finally recaptured in Santa Rosa, New Mexico by a Santa Fe detective who received a $10,000 reward spending the rest of his life behind the prison walls.  The Woodward News reported that Lund killed Dan Clifton, alias “Dynamite Dick”, “King of the Desperados” in December of 1896, near Blackwell.  Deputy Marshal Lund had trailed Dynamite Dick and Ben Cravens for several weeks.  The Daily Oklahoman, February 21, 1915 covers the story of the capture of Ben Cravens and Dynamite Dick. 

(The Woodward News - December 18, 1896) (The Lenora Leader - April 14, 1905) (The Daily Oklahoman - February 21, 1915) (Frontier Trails) (The Cherokee Strip)

 

Alford O. Lund Former State Officer, Dies

 

April 24, 1946—Blackwell, OK—Alford Oscar Lund, 79, pioneer city resident and early day peace officer, with a period as police chief here, died in his home early Tuesday, following a long illness.

          Lund had been confined to his home since October.

          He was born February 17, 1867, near Leavenworth, Kansas, and came to Blackwell in 1893, a short time after the opening of the Cherokee Strip.  Lund served for a time as deputy U. S. marshal, special officer for the Santa Fe railroad for 12 years, a deputy in the sheriff’s office under several administrations and city marshal.

          In recent years he had operated a fruit farm north of the city.

          Surviving are his widow, Mrs. Lizzie Lund; two sons, C. O. Lund, Chicago; and Lester Lund, Blackwell; one daughter Mrs. C. E. Shull, Great Ben, Kansas; and two brothers, Porter Lund of Sacrament, California; and Argus Lund of Sunnyvale, Kansas.

          Porter funeral home is in charge of arrangements.

 

 

Lunds-Lynds

Jessie

H.

D.U.S. Marshal

Muskogee

September 5, 1918 to June 30, 1919

 

Lundy, Joseph P. was commissioned on December 12, 1887, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes.  Lundy attempted to arrest three Seminole Indians named Nocos Harjo, Jefferson Lindsay, and Lilly Lena, in the Seminole Nation.  A gun battle erupted in which Lundy was overpowered, shot, and killed on June 10, 1889.  Bass Reeves arrested Nocos Harjo and Lilly Lena in January of 1890. (Atoka Indian Citizen - January 18, 1890) (The Territorial Topic - February 6, 1890) (Oklahombres) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)   Killed in the line of duty,

 

Lunsford, Jesse S. was commissioned in the Western District of Arkansas in 1897. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Lurty, Jack was the brother of Marshal Warren Lurty.  Deputy Marshal Lurty made a tour of Indian Territory with his brother when his brother was appointed marshal over Oklahoma Territory, on May 14, 1890.

(Shoot From the Lip)

 

Lurty, Warren S. served as deputy marshal in 1890, at Guthrie, Oklahoma Territory. 

(Indian Pioneer History - Jennie Watt Cantelou ) (Indian Pioneer History - Louise S. Barnes) (Shoot from the Lip)