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ROBERT KING'S OKLAHOMA U. S. MARSHALS AND DEPUTY U. S. MARSHALS

Joshua B. Heady to John Hixon

 

Heady, Joshua B. “Bud” was commissioned on November 28, 1887, in the Western District Court at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, where he served as deputy marshal for six years.  Deputy Marshal Heady worked with Bob and Grat Dalton when they served as deputy marshals.  Bud was the first store manager of the town of Watova.  Bud was living at Noxie, Oklahoma, in 1930. 

(Indian Pioneer History - Charles Hepner - Clara Clifford) (Indian Pioneer History - W. F. Jones) (Indian Pioneer History - Susan Morrison) (Indian Pioneer History - Mary Riley Roberts) (Indian Pioneer History - Agnes Walker) (Indian Pioneer History - Charles H. Williams) (Experience of A U.S. Deputy Marshal) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Healy, Mrs. F. B.

D.U.S. Marshal

Tyrone

November 19, 1907

 

Heckler, George was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, where he served as guard and turnkey.  (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Heffington, C. F. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)  (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Heinrich, Joseph “Joe was commissioned in the Northern District of Indian Territory.  Heinrich attempted to arrest Mat Craig on March 15, 1899, at Tahlequah, Cherokee Nation but was killed during the process.  Deputy Marshal Joe Payne and posse arrested Craig thirty miles east of Tahlequah and delivered him to the Muskogee jail. 

(Indian Chieftain, Vinita - March 17, 1899)

 

Helmrick, B. was commissioned on August 22, 1894, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George J. Crump.  .(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Henderson, Charles E.  Deputy U. S. Marshal

Sapulpa Police Officer Dies of Heart Disease

 

January 15 1941--Sapulpa, OK--Sergeant Charles E. Henderson of the Sapulpa police department died at his home Tuesday of heart disease.

          He formerly was a United States deputy marshal and at one time was a forest ranger stationed at Lawton.  His wife, five daughters and two sons survive.  Funeral arrangements were incomplete.

 

Henderson, D. P.  arrested a preacher that stole plows from the Indians.  In April of 1896, the preacher was taken to the Logan County jail. 

(The Woodward News - May 1, 1896)

 

Henderson, Joseph C.  was commissioned in the Southern District of Indian Territory, working out of the federal court at Paris, Texas.  Deputy Marshal Henderson boarded a passenger train in El Reno while in a drunken state.  As the train left El Reno, Henderson became a real nuisance when he pulled his revolver and forced two Anadarko merchants to dance.  The two men danced until Henderson got tired and went into the smoker car where he ordered a passenger named Fleshman to drink liquor.  The man refused to drink the spirits which caused Henderson to swing his revolver at him.  In his drunken stupor the deputy missed the man striking the rear window, breaking it. The drunken deputy fired several shots at Fleshman, missing every shot.  When the train arrived in Chickasaw, a man named Pryor departed from the train ordering a hack.  Henderson also left the train, climbed into the hack with Pryor and the hack driver.  Henderson’s conduct scared the driver into mortal fear making the driver jump from his buggy into the street.  Henderson placed his revolver in Pryor’s breast where he pulled the trigger.  The gun misfired, so Henderson pulled the trigger again, but missed this time.  Henderson left the hack making his escape without being arrested. 

(The Enid Daily Wave - April 13, 1896) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Hendricks, N.B. was commissioned on July 6, 1891, in the Western District of Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes.  In October of 1894, Deputy Marshal Hendricks was in charge of five guards who transported fourteen prisoners to the penitentiary in Columbus, Ohio. 

(The Weekly Elevator - December 22, 1892; May 5, September 22, 1893) (The Advocate - October 19, 1894) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Heniz, Joe was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Hensley, J. T. was commissioned on May 31, 1893, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George J. Crump.  Deputy Marshal Hensley arrested James Sixkiller near the Delaware courthouse in the Cherokee Nation for introducing and selling liquor in Indian Territory.  His prisoner was transported to jail in Ft. Smith, Arkansas to await trial. 

(The Weekly Elevator - July 7, 1893) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Henson, B. V.  was appointed field deputy marshal at Ardmore, Chickasaw Nation, under Marshal Ben Colbert of the Southern District.  Deputy Marshal Henson resigned in November of 1903. 

(The Seiling Guide - December 3, 1903)

 

Henson, John was working in South McAlester, Choctaw Nation in June of 1893, where he arrested Jacob King and Allen Sellers on larceny charges.  The two prisoners were taken to jail in Ft. Smith, Arkansas where they stood trial.  (The Weekly Elevator - June 16, 1893)

 

Herring, I. N.

D.U.S. Marshal

 

April 11, 1907 to June 30, 197

 

Herring, William “Uncle Bill” was appointed as guard to the federal jail at Muskogee under Marshal J. J. McAlester of Indian Territory in 1893.  Gus Lubbes was head federal jailer.  “Uncle Bill” was a major factor in protecting the Buck gang from being lynched while they were being held, before being transported to the federal jail in Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  Other notorious outlaws held during his tour of duty were Eddie Reed, Al Jennings and Cherokee Bill. Jailer Herring retired from the Muskogee jail in 1895.  William Herring was commissioned as deputy marshal in 1913 until 1921, when “Uncle Bill” was sixty-six years old.

 (Indian Pioneer History - William Herring)          

 

Herring, William “Uncle Bill” 

D.U.S. Marshal

 

April 2, 1905

                                        

Herrod, J. M. was commissioned in the Western District of Arkansas in 1897. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Herz, Raymond

D.U.S. Marshal

Ardmore

January 29, 1898

Herz, Raymond

D.U.S. Marshal

Ardmore

April 2, 1904

Herz, Raymond

D.U.S. Marshal

Ardmore

February 19, 1906

Herz, Raymond

D.U.S. Marshal

 

1907

 

Hester, J. R.  was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Hester, Lewis was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Heyden, Whit was commissioned in the Western District of Arkansas, at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  He was born in 1845, and was in the Confederate Army during the Civil War serving in Quantrill”s Raiders. 

(Chronicles Of Oklahoma - Volume 48, 1970)

 

Hicks, R. L.  was commissioned in the Northern District of Indian Territory serving under Marshal W. H. Darrough. 

(File #10, Indian Library, Oklahoma Historical Library)

 

Hickman, J. M.  was appointed field deputy marshal in Blaine county, Oklahoma Territory, in April of 1904, by Marshal George K. Pritchard of the Central District. 

(Woodward Bulletin - April 1, 1904) (The Choctaw News - June 2, 1904)

 

Hickman, J. M.

D.U.S. Marshal

 

July 1, 1906 to December 31, 1906

 

Former Deputy Marshal Dies

 

April 1, 1956--McAlester--J. M. "Mart" Hickman, 80, U. S. deputy marshal in the Indian Territory days, died Saturday in a McAlester hotel following a brief illness.

          He suffered a heart attack earlier in the day.  He was born near Spiro March 6, 1876.  He lived in Pittsburg County for 40 years before moving to Odessa, Texas, two years ago.

          In addition to serving as a deputy U. S. Marshal, he also was a county officer.  He was an employee at Oklahoma State Penitentiary here for 16 years.  

He and his brother, the late Bud Hickman, operated a mercantile company here for 20 years.  He was a member of the Grand Avenue Methodist church in McAlester.

          Hickman was married to Miss Jean Etter at Stigler.

          Survivors include a daughter, Mrs. Bob Lackey jr., Odessa; two brothers, Barb Hickman and Ben Hickman, both of Stigler; two sisters, Mrs. Ida Shields, Borger, Texas, and Mrs. Lena Maxwell Tucker and one grandson.

          Services will be at 2 p.m. Monday at eh Grand Avenue Methodist church.  Burial under the direction of the Humphrey funeral home will follow in Oak Hill cemetery

 

Hickox, Reuben R.  served as deputy marshal in Custer county, Oklahoma Territory.  In March of 1898, the Enid newspaper recorded the deputy marshal was serving subpoenas.  The paper stated that he was an old timer promising a better season that year than any Oklahoma had ever seen since it was settled.  Deputy Marshal Hickox discovered the rock bottom where the wagon bridge crossed the South Canadian River.  The Choctaw railroad bridge was to be built in this same area. He was commissioned in Oklahoma Territory at Guthrie, Oklahoma Territory serving under marshal W. D. Fossett on March 22, 1905.  

(The Enid Weekly Sun - March 31, 1898) (File #10 at Indian Library at Oklahoma City Archives) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T.& O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Hicks, Charlie possibly an Indian Policeman was killed by John Coker and his son Cal.  The father and son were tried but were cleared by the court.

 (Indian Pioneer History - E. D. Sunday)  (Oklahombres)    K

 

Hicks, F.  Deputy Marshal 

 

MURDER CHARGE

Is Launched Against Former Deputy Marshal At Ralston

Men Found Beaten To Death

In Which Crime X. Officer Hicks Is Accused Of Being Accessory

Bigger Claims To Be Cousin Of Late Mark Hanna

 

November 2, 1905-- Guthrie, Oklahoma--The arrest here, this week, of old F. Hicks, at Ralston, until recently a Deputy United States marshal under W. D. Fossett, proved a somewhat of a sensation, as Hicks is well known throughout eastern Oklahoma as a peace officer.  He is charged with complicity in the murder at Bartlesville, last March, of Jon Peters, whose dead body was found on the railroad track, with evidence that he had been beaten to death with clubs.

          At the time the crime was committed, Hicks was city Marshal of Bartlesville, and says he was sick in bed, and can prove an alibi.  Jack Foster was arrested and afterwards indicted for the murder, but while before the grand jury at Nowata he gave information that led to the indictment of Hicks and two others.  Hicks was arrested here by Deputy Marshal Jim Baxter.  He was taken to Nowata yesterday for a preliminary hearing.

          Following the resignation of Joe McGuire, a brother of Congressman McGuire, as deputy United States marshal at Ralston, Hicks was appointed to fill the vacancy.  He resigned only a few weeks ago and the vacancy has not sense been refilled.  McGuire’s resignation followed an exposure of alleged misconduct in office, and came at the same time as did that of 2 United States court commissioners.

          Hicks was formerly a Deputy Sheriff and Noble County during Sheriff Atkins administration and was considered an active Officer, but a little free with the use of a gun.  The people here, who know they ask, believe he will prove himself innocent of the peters murder, or any connection there with.

 

Hicks, O. F. was commissioned on June 1, 1893, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George J. Crump. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Hicks, R. L.

D.U.S. Marshal

 

1907

 

Hicks, William was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  He was killed while serving as a deputy marshal on April 15, 1872, when the marshal’s force tried to remove Zeke Proctor from an Indian police court.  Several deputy marshals were killed and wounded during the altercation which followed. See Zeke Proctor for more information.

 (Indian Pioneer History - Zeke Proctor) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)    Killed in the line of duty.

 

Higgins, George was commissioned in the Northern District of Indian Territory, serving under Marshal W. H. Darrough. 

(File #10, Indian Library, Oklahoma Historical Library)

 

Higgins, George

D.U.S. Marshal

Vinita

October 3, 1904

Higgins, George

D.U.S. Marshal

Claremore

July 19, 1906

Higgins, George

D.U.S. Marshal

 

1907

 

Hignight, W. R

D.U.S. Marshal

 

April 2, 1905

 

Highshew, Charles was commissioned as deputy marshal, in April of 1895 serving in Alva, Oklahoma Territory.  Deputy Marshal Highshew was with J. W. Noah trying to capture Ike Black and Nelson Wyatt alias “Dick Yeager” in the Gloss Mountains near Fairview.  Several deputy marshals were involved in the capture and Highshew’s posse was one hour behind the posse that killed Ike Black and wounded Dick Yeager. 

(The Alva Pioneer - August 9, 1895) (The Alva Chronicle - April 12, 1895)

 

Hildreth, Marion was commissioned to provide law and order in the “Run of the Cherokee Strip” in 1893.  Marion drifted south from Kansas hoping to get prime land during the land run.  His travel took him close to Rusk, which was near the Cimarron River.  Marion later became a commissioner in the Anti-Horse Theft Association.  In August of 1896, Marion Hildreth formed a posse that ended the reign of terror the Yeager and Black gang dealt the farmers in the Fairview area.  The gang was acquainted with the Bill Doolin gang and was suspected to have taken part in a train robbery with that gang near Dover, Oklahoma.  Yeager and Black were primarily guilty of crimes such as murder, horse theft, robbing post offices and small general stores.  The citizens in the area developed an extreme hatred for the two as they stopped at their dugouts asking for a meal.  The two outlaws would always offer to pay for the food with $20 which they expected change.  When change was made the outlaws would know where the people hid their money so they would come back during the night to get the rest of their money.  Marion Hildreth and his posse found Ike Black north of Longdale where Black was killed.  Yeager, seriously wounded, hid in a corn patch for a period of time, then fled to Sheridan where  Garfield deputy Poak and Deputy Sheriff Woods shot him in the hip.  Yeager was taken to Hennessey by Sheriff Thrall of Garfield County where he was taken by train to Enid.  Before Yeager died he made a death bed confession to a murder he had committed. 

(Muskogee Phoenix - April 5, 1895) (The Taloga Advocate August 3, 10, 17, September 14, 1895) (The Alva Pioneer - August 9, 1895) (Gloss Mountain Country) (Twin Territories Times)

 

Hile, W. H. was commissioned on January 5, 1895, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George J. Crump.  Deputy Marshal Hile lived in Huntington, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Hill, A. J. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  In May of 1886, Deputy Marshal Hill returned from Indian Territory with John Shepard charged with larceny. 

(Ft. Smith Elevator - May 7, 1886) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Hill, Bud was office deputy marshal working out of the court at Cameron, I. T. Deputy Marshal Hill was working with Boley Grady to serve a warrant of arrest to a boy named Floyd Simpson who was charged with disturbing a worship service in the Walnut Grove Church in Jensen, Arkansas, which was on the dividing line between Indian Territory and Arkansas.  Boley Grady went to the boy who was standing within forty yards of the church to serve the warrant of arrest.  The boy was in the officers grasp when he tried to pull free.  Grady pulled his pistol and struck the boy over the head several times.  The boy’s mother called to the father, Jasper Simpson, to come to the boy’s aid.  Jasper Simpson approached Boley Grady from the rear and shot him in the neck with a 38 caliber pistol.  Jasper Simpson turned from the falling Boley Grady to fire at Deputy Marshal Bud Hill.  Boley Grady died as he fell to the ground while Bud Hill lived long enough to ask for a drink of water.  Jasper Simpson evaded the law for six years until he turned himself into the McAlester court where he was released.

 (The Bennington Tribune - March 23, 1905) (Indian Pioneer History - Robert Lee Kersey) (Indian Pioneer History - J.C. Ritter)     Killed in the line of duty.

 

Hill, Fred was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Hill, John W.  was commissioned on July 9, 1872, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Logan S. Roots.  Hill was from Big Creek Township, Sebastian County, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Hill, Leander was commissioned on August 12, 1872, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Logan S. Roots.  Deputy Marshal Hill was from Sebastian County, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Hill, L. S.  was killed while on duty serving as a deputy marshal on July 17, 1898. 

(Oklahombres)

 

Hill, W. H. 

(Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Hilles, Dave E.  U. S. Marshal 1941

 

Dave E. Hilles Nominated For Marshal's Post

 

February 14, 1941--The Oklahoman--Quick confirmation by the United States senate of Dave E. Hilles, 42-year old Stillwater hardware salesman, as United States marshal for the western Oklahoma district, was expected here Thursday.

          Confirmation is considered a formality since both Senators Lee and Thomas have agreed on Hilles' whose nomination was sent to the senate Thursday by President Roosevelt.

          Usual procedure would be for the senate judiciary committee to recommend to the senate that Hilles' nomination be confirmed. Hilles has never held a political office.

 

Hinchel, James E. was commissioned in the Western District of Arkansas in 1897. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Hinds, Robert W. was born in Sevier County Arkansas in 1846.  Robert served in the Civil War with his father.  In 1877, Robert moved to Garvin, Choctaw Nation in McCurtain County, where he was the only white resident for many years.  Soon after his arrival to Indian Territory, Robert was commissioned as deputy marshal where he served for many years.  Robert Hinds was buried in the Canfield cemetery near Idabel, Choctaw Nation. 

(Indian Pioneer History - Belle Hinds) (McCurtain County and Southeast Oklahoma)

 

Hinds, W. T.  was selected as field deputy, in March of 1901, by Marshal Benjamin Hackett of the Central District.  Hinds was assigned to the Goodwater Court. 

(The Antlers Democrat - April 12, 1901)

 

Hindman, Frank was commissioned at Guthrie, Oklahoma Territory on July 15, 1893, working under Marshal Evett Nix.  Deputy Marshal Hindman served at Guthrie, Oklahoma Territory, with Heck Thomas until December of 1895.  (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)  (West Of Hell’s Fringe)

 

Hindman, Frank

D.U.S. Marshal

 

January 21, 1919 to June 30, 1919

 

Hines, Edward R. was commissioned in 1895 to El Reno, Oklahoma Territory.  Edward worked with Deputy Marshals Heck Bruner, Tom Johnson, Pleas Bussey, and Zeke Parris.  Edward Hinds was born in 1880. 

(Indian Pioneer History - Edward Hines)  (U.S. Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Hines, Frank was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Hinkle, M. F. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Hisley, W. S. a jailer and Marshal Needles of the Muskogee court were ordered by Judge Charles Parker to show why writs of Habeas Corpus should not be issued in five larceny cases and one assault case. 

(The Territorial Topic - October 10, 1889)

 

Hitchcock, Brown was commissioned on April 6, 1894, in the Western District at Ft. Smith Arkansas, serving under Marshal George J. Crump.  Brown lived in Tahlequah, Cherokee Nation.

 (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Hixon, John was commissioned at Guthrie, Oklahoma Territory in July 1894, serving until June of 1896 under Marshals Evett Nix and Patrick S. Nagle.  He headed the posse that went to Ingalls, Oklahoma Territory, to serve a warrant of arrest to the Bill Doolin Gang.  The gang was wanted for a number of charges but their involvement in the Wharton train robbery made the marshals decide to bring in the gang at any cost.  To entice the capture of the outlaws’ large rewards were placed on all gang members which amounted to thousands of dollars.  The federal marshals were aware that the gang would not be brought in without a gun battle so a “Dead Or Alive” issue was placed on the reward.  The Doolin Gang was hand picked by Bill Doolin and William Dalton.  The gang leaders selections were carefully made picking members who were good at their trade and trustworthy in protecting the gang.  Capturing or eliminating the gang would be a very difficult task for the lawmen.  This would require a good plan.  The town of Ingalls catered to the outlaw gang, providing them entertainment, shelter and any supplies they needed.  The robberies performed by the outlaws provided them with considerable wealth which they shared with anyone who would be a host to them.  On September 1, 1893, a covered wagon left from Stillwater, Oklahoma Territory, while another departed from Guthrie, Oklahoma Territory, hauling a posse made up of deputy marshals that were hidden in the wagons.  The wagons were covered with canvas to attract as little attention as possible.  Posse members under Hixon were:  Lafe Shadley, Ham Houston, Tom Houston, Henry Keller, Dick Speed, Steve Burke, H. A. Thompson and Jim Masterson.  Dick Speed and Lafe Shadley were killed in the gun battle that ensued while trying to arrest the gang.  Arkansas Tom was the only outlaw to be captured.  Deputy Marshal Hixon served under Marshal Evett Nix at Guthrie on July 15, 1893, along with Heck Thomas.  In 1894, Hixon helped to protect the court under Judge Dale when the judge received a death threat from the Doolin gang.  Judge Dale was no friend to any outlaw.  The judge’s quote that angered Doolin was “The only good outlaw is a dead outlaw”.

 (Bill Tilghman) (Guardian of the Law) (West Of Hell’s Fringe) (Shooting From the Lip) (Charles Francis Colcord) (Outlaws On Horse Back) (Picture-Oklahombres) (The Lawmen) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (The Marshals Monitor - Microsoft Internet Explorer)