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ROBERT KING'S OKLAHOMA U. S. MARSHALS AND DEPUTY U. S. MARSHALS

 

Andrew Jackson Crabtree to J. O. Cutler

 

Crabtree, Andrew Jackson was commissioned on October 26, 1894, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George J. Crump.  Andrew Lived in Remy, Indian territory. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Crabtree, Clay was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Craddock, John was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas where he served as day guard. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Craig, W. H. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Cravens, Will H. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Cravens, Richard K. was commissioned on July 1, and July 31, 1896.  He was recommended by President Theodore Roosevelt for commission as 1st Lieutenant while Cravens was serving as deputy marshal in Indian Territory at Muskogee. 

(The Woodward Bulletin - March 7, 1902) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office)

 

Cravens, Richard K. 

D.U.S. Marshal

Muskogee

February 20, 1897

Cravens, William H.

D.U.S. Marshal

 

July 1, 1896

Cravens, William H.

Deputy U. S. Marshal

Fort Smith

1897

 

Crawford, Bob rode with a posse made up of deputy marshals which included Bill Merrel, Patty, and Bill Morey to search for one thousand pounds of smoked meat that was stolen from Morey Springs then taken to Hickory Ground.  Chitto

Harjo was holding council when deputy marshal Morey went to look for the meat.  Chitto Harjo had a definite dislike for white men.  He had threatened to kill every white citizen in Henryetta.  Harjo asked the old deputy marshal not to disturb his council.  This was his way of putting off the investigation for he wanted the deputies to wait until another time for make the investigation.  Deputy Marshal Morey realizing trouble was brewing went to get a warrant of arrest and a posse.  When the lawmen returned they were met by the forces of Chitto Harjo who forced the officers to retreat. 

(Indian Pioneer History - Tice Woods)

 

Crawford, Kranium F. was commissioned on July 15, 1884, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Crawley, Ben was commissioned as deputy marshal in the Kansas Court at Wichita, Kansas, working the northern part of Indian Territory. 

(Indian Pioneer History - A. J. Johnson)

 

Creekmore, Milo was commissioned in the Western District of Arkansas. Deputy Marshal Creekmore was summoned to arrest outlaw Ned Christie near Tahlequah, Cherokee Nation.  Christie had killed Deputy Marshal Dan Maples and wounded two others in three previous attempts to arrest him.  Judge Parker, realizing how dangerous Ned Christie was, placed a Dead Or Alive order on his warrant.  Three members of this posse were wounded and Christie again eluded the officers.  Note:  Refer to the “Capture of Ned Christie” for more information.  In November of 1891, Milo was with Deputy Marshal Bass Reeves near Okmulgee when they tried to arrest Ben Billey, a whiskey peddler and Tom Barnett, a horse thief.  The two outlaws knew they didn’t want to go to Ft. Smith so they tried to shoot their way out.  Billey received two slugs in his leg before the two surrendered.  Milo Creekmore was a tall, blond, curly headed man. 

(Indian Citizen - December 21, 1889, April 5, 19, & May 17, 1890) (The Territorial Topic - November 19, 1891) (Indian Pioneer History - Hugh William Winder) (Black, Red And Deadly) (Hell on the Border-Harman) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Everett Milo Creekmore was born on October 21, 1870 in Crawford County, Arkansas. In 1880, he was living with his parents and siblins in Vine Prairie Township, Crawford County, Arkansas where his father was farming. He was a son of Deputy U.S. Marshal R. B. Creekmore. He was a deputy U.S. marshal for the Western District of Arkansas from May 1889 to October 1892. On October 11, 1892, Creekmore and fellow marshals, William Bouden, David Rusk, and Charlie Copeland cornered Ned Christie in the Cherokee Nation. After a gunfight where three of the marshals were wounded, Christie managed to escape. Following his law enforcement career, he fell in with the Henry Starr Gang and robbed two stores with Starr for which he was arrested and taken to Fort Smith. He made bond and, while out awaiting trial, shot and killed the father of his sweetheart, Cora Runyan. The father had objected to the courtship and, while the two were together at her aunt's home, the father rode up with a gun in his hand. Creekmore gave himself up at Fort Smith and was tried on the robbery and murder charges, being acquitted on the murder charge and found guilty on the robbery charges. He was sentenced to five years in the Kings County Penitentiary at Brooklyn, New York. While awaiting trial at Fort Smith, Cora Runyan and Creekmore were married in the jail on October 22, 1893. It is believed they never had children and Cora died shortly thereafter as Creekmore married Alma Louise Yarbrough on September 2, 1902 in Texas. In 1910-1930, he was living with his wife and two children in Cherokee County, Texas where he was a locomotive engineer. Creekmore died on May 10, 1931 in Clawson, Cherokee County, Texas. He was buried in Hope Cemetery in Wells, Texas.

(One World Tree Project, ancestry.com) (Bixby [Oklahoma] Historical Society List of Early Area Lawmen & Outlaws) (Deadly Affrays: The Violent Deaths of the U.S. Marshals, by Robert Ernst) (IGuns and the Gunfighters -Law West of Fort Smith, by Glenn Shirley)

 

Creekmore, Randolph Brown was commissioned on December 4, 1889, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes. 

(Ft. Smith Elevator - May 9, 1890) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office)

 

Creekmore, Renfro D. was commissioned on May 29, 1889, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes.  In July of 1890, Renfro was summoned with Deputy Marshal M.D. Collins to Cherokee country to serve warrants of arrest to William Merrel and Hiram Johnson for introducing liquor into Indian Territory. 

(Ft. Smith Elevator - July 25, 1890) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Criswell, Benjamin D. O. worked out of Grant, Choctaw Nation before moving to Antlers, in February of 1901.  Ben was assigned to the Central District where he worked for six years in the Wapanuka, Indian Territory area.  In November of 1902, Ben and officer Bridges arrested two Negro horse thieves near Wapanucka, Indian Territory.  During the arrest one of the thieves was shot in the mouth, leaving him seriously wounded.  In April of 1904, Criswell was appointed deputy marshal at Wapunucka by Marshal George Pritchard.  In April of 1905, Criswell was again selected as field deputy in the Atoka court by Marshal George Pritchard .  

(Woodward Bulletin - April 1, 1904) (The Antlers Democrat - February 8, 1901) (Ft. Smith Elevator - November 14, 1902) (The Durant Times - April 21, 1905) (The Choctaw News - June 2, 1904) (Oklahoma Genealogical Society Quarterly - Volume 36, 1991, #1) (Picture - Notable Men Of Indian Territory)

 

Criswell, Benjamin D. O.

D.U.S. Marshal

1907

 

Crittenden, Dick was commissioned in the Western District of Arkansas, Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  On July 18, 1894, Dick and Zeke Crittenden were with Deputy Marshal Sequoyah Houston and posse when they tried to capture the Cook Gang.  Bill Cook, the leader of the gang was running from the law traveling toward Fourteen Mile Creek in the Cherokee Nation with his brother Jim Cook and gang member, Cherokee Bill.  Cherokee Bill was wanted for murder and the Cooks were charged with robbery.  A running gun battle started when the outlaws tried to distance themselves from the marshal’s force.  The gang took cover when the three deputies overtook them.  Sequoyah Houston was killed as he rode into the outlaws gunfire.  The battle got so hot that the sheriff and posse fled, leaving the two Crittendens to face the Cooks and Cherokee Bill.  Jim Cook was wounded seven times during the gun battle.  The outlaws took Jim Cook to Ft. Gibson where a doctor attended his wounds.  The deputy marshals contacted the gang near Ft. Gibson where Bill Cook and Cherokee Bill made their escape leaving Jim Cook behind.  Dick and brother Zeke lived in Wagoner, Indian Territory where they served as deputy marshals.  On October 24, 1895, the Crittenden brothers, having to much to drink, became involved in a row with a Wagoner resident.  Their argument led to shooting where their victim was wounded.  Deputy Marshal Ed Reed, son of Belle Starr, asked the Crittendens to surrender their guns which they refused.  Ed Reed shot and killed both brothers.

(Outlaws and Lawmen) (Picture - Hell on the Border-Harman) (Picture - Outlaws on Horseback) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)   Killed in the line of duty.

 

Crittenden, Zeke served in the Western District of Arkansas.  See Information on Dick Crittenden. 

(Outlaws and Lawmen) (Picture - Hell on the Border) (Picture - Outlaws on Horseback) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)   K

 

Crockett, Lee was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Crosby, Charles C. was commissioned in Oklahoma Territory in 1895, serving under Marshal Evett Nix.  He was working the Pond Creek area when the Pond Creek sheriff would not uphold his duties as lawman to make an arrest.  Crosby used his authority as deputy marshal to make the arrest.  Crosby was born in 1873 and died in Garfield County. 

(Indian Pioneer History - Judge J. W. Bird) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Crouse, Keith E.

D.U.S. Marshal

July 1, 1918 to January 18, 1919

 

Crow, J. E. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Crowder, John W. was commissioned on July 17, 1889, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes.  In April of 1889, Deputy Marshal Crowder arrested two white men who were charged with introducing liquor into Indian Territory.  In April of 1894, he brought in Dennis Kennedy whom he captured after a long chase near Tecumseh, and took him to Fort Smith where he was wanted for bribery, attempted murder.  When captured his prisoner was armed with a Winchester, long knife and two revolvers. 

(The Alva Chronicle - April 20, 1894) (Ft. Smith Elevator - July 26, 1889) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Crowder, Martin served in the Central District in 1894. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Crowder, William H.  was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Crowder, W. R.  was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  He arrested Hiram George for larceny, in February of 1890, and then transported him to the federal court in Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Indian Citizen - February 15, 1890) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Crump, Arch M. was commissioned on March 12, 1895, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George J. Crump. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Crump, George J.

U. S. Marshal

Fort Smith,

May 29, 1893

 

Culp, Thomas and Deputy Marshal Meadows overtook outlaw Dick Glass at the foot of the Arbuckle Mountains in 1885, where they discharged their weapons at him, critically wounding him.  The officers, thinking the outlaw was dead, approached him and as they neared their prey, Glass arose to one knee, took deadly aim killing Meadows instantly.  Before Culp could react Glass fired a second shot which left Culp seriously wounded.  The notorious Dick Glass killed six lawmen and had many indictments filed against him in Indian Territory and Texas.  In January of 1888, Culp was killed by a man named Wooford in the Chickasaw Nation.  A friend of Culps, who was riding with him, killed Wooford.

(The Indian Champion - April 5, 1885) (Indian Chieftain, Vinita - January 5, 1888)    Killed in the line of duty.

 

Cummings, D. W. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Cummings, Hugh T.  Deputy U. S. Marshal

Veteran Peace Officer Dies; Funeral Today

 

March 17, 1955--The Oklahoman--Masonic services for Hugh T. "Jack Cummings, 71 veteran peace officer and retired city constable, will be at 4 p.m. Thursday in the Smith & Kernke funeral home, with interment in Memorial Park cemetery.  He died of a cerebral hemorrhage Tuesday in an Oklahoma City hospital.

          Cummings held a variety of offices in state and city law enforcement agencies.  In 1921 he was a U. S. Marshal for western Oklahoma, and later served on the city police force for three years.  He was one-time night chief of police in Seminole, and from 1929 to 1931 worked for the Oklahoma County highway patrol.

          Cummings was elected city constable here in 1932 and re-joined the police department here in 1936 for three years.  Through election and appointment, he was constable here from 1939 until 1949 when he resigned to become a deputy sheriff under Newt Burns.

          A native of Curdsville, KY., Cummings came to Oklahoma in 1919. He was a Spanish-American war veteran, and a past commander of Theodore Roosevelt camp No. 1 here.

          A member of the United church, he was also a 32nd degree Mason, a Shriner, and a member of the Scottish Rites lodge.

          Survivors include his wife, Lena, of the home; one sister, Mrs. Allen Davis, Herrin, Illinois; and three brothers, M. L. Cummings, 407 N Walnut; Everett Cummings, Marion, Illinois; and George Cummings, Peoria, Illinois.

 

Cummings, Robert M. served as deputy marshal for seven years in the Southern District of Indian Territory, headquartered at Ardmore.  In August of 1905, Deputy Marshal Cummings was living in Ada, Chickasaw Nation when he rode with Deputy Marshals Brice and Chapman to arrest a Chickasaw Indian named Clarence Brown.   Brown was charged with killing his mother and brother, then seriously wounding his stepfather.  The incident resulted from a family dispute when Clarence tried to take control of the family’s land allotment. 

Clarence Brown was taken to jail in Ardmore.   In May of 1905, Robert Cummings fifteen year old son, Leon, was accidentally shot and killed.  Robert Cummings was living in Ardmore at the time of the accident. 

(Woodward Bulletin - May 12, 1905) (Marietta Monitor - August 25, 1905)

 

Cummings, Robert M.

D.U.S. Marshal

July 1, 1906 to May 15, 1906

 

Cummins, Orange Scott was commissioned in the Wichita, Kansas court under Marshal Charles Miller.  Cummins operated a general store and post office at Lodi, Kansas southwest of Medicine Lodge, Kansas.  An arsenal was set up in the building to supply arms for settlers in case of Indian raids. 

(Pioneer Foot Prints Across Woods County)

 

Cummins, William Anthony was commissioned on October 15, 1890, and January 16, 1892 under Judge Parker’s court at Ft. Smith in the Western District of Arkansas.  Cummins had authority to work anywhere within the Indian Territory, which was from the Arkansas line, west to Oklahoma Territory and from the Red River, north to the Kansas line.

(Indian Pioneer History - William Anthony Cummins) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)Cunningham, A. B. served in the Northern Judicial District in 1894. (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Death Claims Former Chief of Cherokees

A.   B. Cunningham Was Mayor of Tahlequah; Pioneer Peace Officer

 

September 13, 1928—Muskogee—A. B. Cunningham, former president of the Cherokee Indian nation under appointment by former President Woodrow Wilson, former post-master and mayor of Tahlequah and peace office of Sequoyah County and deputy United States marshal, died in a hospital here Wednesday, after a long illness.

          Only recently, however, was Cunningham brought to Muskogee when the illness which had affected him for several years became acute.  He was 59 years old.

          Funeral rites will be conducted Thursday afternoon at Tahlequah, burial to be in a Tahlequah cemetery.

Born Near Vinita

          Cunningham was born near Vinita, Indian Territory, May 1, 1869.  He was educated in the Cherokee training school near Tahlequah and after having been graduated from there located in Tahlequah, where he spent the remainder of his life.

          He formerly was sheriff of Sequoyah County, deputy United States district marshal; executive secretary of the Cherokee nation under chiefs J. M. Buffington and W. C. Rogers, until Cherokee affairs were closed in 1912.  He served as postmaster at Tahlequah for two terms, as mayor three terms and president of the chamber of commerce.

Mother Still Lives

          He is survived by his wife, mother, Mrs. Kezia Cunningham; two brothers, Jeter and Johnson, all of Tahlequah, and three sisters, Mrs. Connell Rogers, Fort Gibson; Mrs. Lillian Grant and Mrs. T. O. Graham, Tahlequah.

          Bearers for the funeral will be J. c. Hunt, Lee Strauss, T. Wyley, Roy Wiggins, Arch Fulcher and Don Dohea.

 

Cunningham, Dee was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.

 (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Cunningham, J. T. served in the Northern Judicial District in 1894. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Cunningham, W. H. was commissioned as a salaried deputy marshal after 1900.  Cunningham was living at Muskogee, in 1930. 

(Experiences of A U.S. Deputy Marshal) (Indian Pioneer History - W. F. Jones) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Cunningham, W. H.

D.U.S. Marshal

 

July 21 1906 to June 30 1907

 

Cunnus, W. A. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  In January of 1892, he served a warrant of arrest to Joseph Dorris who was wanted on a charge of rape.  Dorris was taken to the Ft. Smith, Arkansas federal jail where he awaited jail. 

(Ft. Smith Elevator - February 12, 1892) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Curnutt, Ada was a commissioned deputy marshal and district clerk in the Norman area.  In March of 1893, Marshal Grimes telegraphed the Norman office telling them there were two desperados who had committed perjury, then fled to Oklahoma City.  The marshal wanted the men arrested immediately.  Ada could not find a male deputy marshal so she donned her bonnet and caught the first train to Oklahoma City.  Her search for the two men took her to a saloon where she confronted the two men.  Ada asked the two men to come outside with her, which they did.  Ada served the warrant of arrest placing the perjurers under arrest.  The men still thinking they were a victim of a joke allowed Ada to place her handcuffs over their wrists.   Ada, only twenty-four years old at the time, took the two surprised men to jail.  On March 11, 1893, Ada had the privilege of taking the men to Guthrie, Oklahoma Territory where they were tried and convicted. 

(Moments In Oklahoma History) (The Lawmen)

 

Currin, G. I. was the first black deputy marshal to serve in Oklahoma Territory. 

(Indian Library at Oklahoma City Archives - File #10, Master Thesis of Bob L. Blackburn)

 

Curry, George H. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Curtis, John was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  In December of 1885, Deputy Marshal Curtis captured two notorious horse thieves, Silas Davis and John Truster.  The two prisoners were taken to the Wichita Agency where they were held for trial.  He was in charge of the investigation of John Paris and Nancy Shell who were suspects in the killing of Deputy Marshal Daniel Maples.   Evidence showed the deputy marshal was most likely killed by Ned Christie, a cohort of John Paris.  Nancy Shell was arrested for selling whiskey in the Cherokee Nation. 

(Heck Thomas) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Cutler, Cutter was commissioned in the Western District of Arkansas.  Cutler’s name appears in Judge Parker's clerk accounts where he was appointed commissioner of the Western District Court of Ft. Smith to be stationed at Eufaula, Indian Territory.  

(Circuit Court For Western District of Arkansas Volume 1, May 6, 1889 to November 4, 1893) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Cutler, J. O. Deputy U. S. Marshal

 

J. O. Cutler’s Rites Are Held

 

July 22, 1950—Red Oak—Funeral for J. O. Cutler, 77 former Latimer county officer and United States deputy marshal, was Friday afternoon at the Baptist church here.  Burial was in the Red Oak cemetery.

          Cutler died Thursday in a McAlester hospital following an extended illness.

          He was born November 1, 1872, in Salem, Arkansas.  He came to Oklahoma—then Indian Territory—when he was 8 years of age.

          Cutler served as Latimer County deputy sheriff, under sheriff and county commissioner.  Prior to statehood, he was a deputy U. S. marshal.

          He was a charter member of the Odd Fellow lodge, Masonic lodge and the Junior Order of Red Oak.  He had been a member of the Baptist church for 30 years.

          Survivors include three sons, Eugene, Chula Vista, California; Wince, Red Oak, and Al, Hartshorne