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KING'S OKLAHOMA U. S. MARSHALS AND U. S. DEPUTY MARSHALS

Gabe L. Bick to William L. Byrd Jr.

 

Bick, Gabe L. was commissioned in the Northern District of Indian Territory, assigned to the Muskogee court in April of 1895. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals - 1893 - 1896)  National Archives, Washington D.C. - Account # 11959)

 

Bickford, swore out several warrants of arrest then served them charging a conspiracy was being made to overthrow the city government.  The warrants went to the editors of the Times newspaper. 

(The Territorial Topic - September 26, 1889)

 

Bickle, Charles W. Deputy U. S. Marshal under W. D. “Bill” Fossett

Bickel Passes

Once Prominent Political Worker Dies In Guthrie Hospital

Never Rewarded Politics

Died a Deputy United States Marshal and is Buried Through the Charity of Old-Time Friends

 

August 2, 1906—Guthrie, OK—The death here of early today of Charles W. Bickle, removes one of the most prominent political figures of early days in Woods County.  He has made his headquarters in Guthrie since early last year, when he was appointed a deputy United States marshal under “Bill” Fossett.  Several days ago he became critically ill and was removed yesterday to the Guthrie hospital.  While delirious he jumped from a second story window, breaking his leg and sustaining internal injuries.

          During the Flynn-for-congress days, in the ‘990s Bickel was one of the most prominent republican politicians in the territory.  He carried Woods County in his vest pocket, so far as the republicans were concerned, and delivered the goods as a Flynn sub-chief.  He was never politically rewarded, however, the only position he held being the deputy marshalship above referred to, and the position of custodian at Fort Supply fro several years, an unremunerative and thankless job.

          Bickle has spent his fortune.  Today the politicians, who knew Bickel for his true worth, gave liberally toward the fund which will provide for him worthy funeral and burial ceremonies.

 

Bickly, Jacob G. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Biggers, J. T.  was commissioned in the Northern District of Indian Territory , serving under Marshal W. H. Darroughs. 

(File #10, Indian Library, Oklahoma Historical Library)

 

Bigsby, Tom rode with Marshal Leo Bennett and Deputy Marshals Thompson and Frank Jones, in 1895, to capture Johnson Tiger, a Seminole Indian wanted for the killing of a fellow tribesman. 

(Experiences of A U.S. Deputy Marshal)

 

Billings, E. V.

D.U.S. Marshal

Guthrie

April 7, 1902

 

Billings, M. O.

D.U.S. Marshal

Guthrie

April 7, 1902

Billingsley, A. A.

D.U.S. Marshal

South McAllister

May 17, 1898

 

Bills, Kay L.

D.U.S. Marshal

Muskogee

July 1, 1902

Bills, Kay L.

D.U.S. Marshal

Wagner  

April 1, 1898

 

Billy, Jim was commissioned in the Southern District Court at Paris, Texas, under Marshal Sheb Williams.  He was killed on July 13, 1890, near Stonewall, Chickasaw Nation.  His death was thought to be accidental. 

(Ft. Smith Elevator - July 25, 1890) (Oklahombres)

 

Binion, Martin Cavett

D.U.S. Marshal

April 3, 1919 to June 30, 1919

 

M. C. Binion, Former Police Chief, Dies

Veteran Was Pioneer in Peace Office Fork

 

February 8, 1941—Daily Oklahoman—One of the best known peace officers in Oklahoma, Martin Cavett Binion, died at his home, 1125 Northwest Twenty-fourth street Friday afternoon of a heart ailment.  Twenty minutes before his death he complained to his wife of a pain in his side.

          Binion, 75 years old, was at one time Oklahoma county sheriff, deputy United State Marshal, federal prohibition agent, and chief of police here three times.  He ended nearly 40 years’ police duty when he retired June 1, 1939, because of ill health.  Shortly afterwards he underwent an operation and since then had enjoyed the best health he had known in 20 years.

          Survivors include his wife; two sons, M. C. jr., Chickasha; and Deale B., Omaha, Nebraska; four daughters, Mrs. C. R. Harriman, Larchmont, N. Y.’ Mrs. M. E. Newman, 2613 North Shartel; Mrs. Robert E. Cooper, Kansas City, Missouri; and Mrs. W. R. Pittinger; two brothers, Clayte, and Non, both of Lufkin, Texas, and five grand children.  Arrangements are in charge of Garrison funeral home.

          The first to pay tribute to the veteran officer was Frank Smith, police chief.  “I regret ever much to hear of the passing of Binion,” Smith said.  “Oklahoma City not only lost a fine officer, but a good clean citizen. He was a fine man.”

 

40 Years a Peace Officer Binion Went All The Way

 

February 8, 1941—Daily Oklahoman--Insurance agent, deputy United States marshal, and for many years a deputy sheriff and member of the city police force worked through the transition period in police work.

          For nearly 40 of his 75 years he served as a peace officer.  He began in the two gun era and worked until the scientific crime detection of the G-men had become the criterion of officers the country over.  He resigned June 1, 1939, because of ill health.

          At the time of his resignation he was jailer at the city clinic.  Before that he was traffic arrant officer until the spring of 1939.

          Big, quiet Binion, a broth of a man who tipped the scales at 200 pounds, fell heir to the job of police chief in 1921 under the hectic reign of May Jack Walton.  After four months he resigned, accusing Walton of taking control of the department and ruining discipline of the officers.

Not for $1,000 a Day

          Walton reinstated appointees whom Binion had fired for disobedience.  When a citizens’ committee asked the slouch hated, cigar chewing chief to remain in office, he replied:

          “I wouldn’t work for Jack Walton for $1,000 a day!”

          During the time Mike Donnelly, city commissioner, filled out the unexpired term of Mayor Walton, elected governor.  Binion served again as chief of police for four moths in 1923.  His third time in the chief’s seat was under E. M. Fry, city manager, from 1927 to May 1928 when he was reduced to a detective.

          Coming to Oklahoma from Texas in the 189’s Binion began peach officer work as a deputy sheriff at Luther. Later he moved to Oklahoma City and was a deputy under Sheriffs George and Harve Garrison.  In 1910 he held the office of sheriff for five months when Harve Garrison was removed from office, then returned to his old job as deputy when Garrison was reinstated.

Twice Elected Sheriff

          Twice he was elected sheriff, in 1912 and in 1914.  He ran unsuccessfully for sheriff in 1910 and again in 1928.

          He was a deputy United States Marshal, and in 1921 was appointed head of the federal liquor enforcement group here, the job he resigned to become chief of police the first time. Again from 1923 to 1926 he was a deputy sheriff, and then worked two years as an insurance agent.

          He first joined the police department more than 30 years ago, and was in the department at various times for an aggregate of more than 20 yeas service.  In that time he held every rank in the department from patrolman to chief.

          “Binion didn’t like to use a gun but he could if the occasion demanded.”

M. C. Binion

John G. Heep, 26151/2 North Douglas Avenue, who was a fellow deputy sheriff with Binion recalled.

Only Killed One Man

          It was Binion’s boast that he had to kill only one man in his long career as an officer.  That man was Otis Tillman, Negro, and a former convict wanted for a series of forgeries.

          Binion and his partner, Charles York, veteran policeman, in 1933 cornered the suspect in a rooming house at Grand and Geary avenues.  When the Negro fatally shot York and prepared to fire a second shot, Binion killed him.

          Of the old school of officers, Binion believed a couple of good informers were worth more than a laboratory full of science.  Nor was he ever sold on natty uniforms and specialization for policemen.  His idea of a policeman was one who was a patrolman, traffic officer detective, or whatever the occasion demanded.

Friends recalled that he was one of the most conscientious members of the department.  Often when he considered it necessary when he was traffic warrant officer, he would go out early in the morning, regardless of his hours of assigned duty, to serve papers on an elusive violator.

 

Birchfield, B.C. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  He was with Deputy Marshal Newton La Force when La Force was killed by outlaws Buss Luckey and Tom Root on December 5, 1894, at Broken Arrow Settlement, Creek Nation.  The two outlaws belonged to a gang led by outlaw “Texas Jack” Reed who specialized in robbing trains.  In 1896, Birchfield was riding with Deputy Marshal Brazell in the San Bois Mountains east of McAlester where they were in search of a band of outlaws led by A. S. Harris, a fugitive who broke jail in South McAlester in 1895.  After Harris made his escape he formed a gang who terrorized the area with their thievery.  When the deputy marshals challenged the gang a running gun battle developed.  During the gunfire exchange one of the outlaws was wounded while the rest of the gang escaped.   A man and woman who befriended the outlaws were arrested for harboring. 

(Ft. Smith Elevator - January 16, 1890) (Hell on the Border - Harman) (Black Red and Deadly) (The Enid Daily Wave - May 6, 1896) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Bird, John D. was commissioned on September 26, 1889, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes.

(Ft. Smith Oaths of Office)

 

Birnie, Cornelius S. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas on July 19, 1872, serving under Marshal Logan S. Roots.  Cornelius lived in Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Birnie, William S. “Will was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas on August 16, 1872, serving under Marshal Logan S. Roots.  William lived in Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

 

Bishop, B. was commissioned in Oklahoma Territory in April through June of 1894, serving under Marshal Evett Dumas Nix. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

 

Bishop, J. W.

D.U.S. Marshal

Cleo

November 19, 1907

Bishop, P. L.

D.U.S. Marshal

Geary

November 19, 1907

Black, O. C.

D.U.S. Marshal

Oklahoma City

November 19, 1907

 

Black, Dotson Deputy U. S. Marshal

Dotson Black, Wagon Train Veteran, Dies

 

May 11, 1949—Dotson Black, who used to shoot deer on open prairie where Oklahoma City now stands, died Tuesday in the home of his daughter, Mrs. Rose Gillaspy, 1125 NW 43.  He was 86 years old and had been ill about a year of heart disease.

          Black, before his marriage in 1898, drove 20-mule teams from Caldwell, Kansas, to Mobeetie, Texas, across the wild country that is now Oklahoma.

          He drove from Jess Evans, who operated a wagon train out of Caldwell.  They hauled supplies to the cattlemen in Texas and later to the forts in Oklahoma, shuttling back and forth from Fort Reno to Fort Sill.  On the trip back to Kansas they hauled bones, which they sold for fertilizer and buttons.

          After the wagon trains stopped, he, his brothers and his parents moved to the Comanche Indian country near what is now Lawton.  He often told his two daughters of the five-gallon coffee pot which was always going in their home.  Comanche Indians, at that time unfriendly with most white persons, used to come to drink coffee and dance for his family Chief Hawkeye was one of Black’s devoted friends.

          Black’s second daughter Mrs. J. L. Keller, 1620 NE 14, recalls a story her father told about one of his trips through Oklahoma.  The Apache Indians, on the warpath, approached the wagon train demanding tobacco.  The drivers threw them sacks of tobacco twists and the Indians left, “much to our relief,” he said.

          After the run, Black homesteaded a farm near Fairview where he and his wife lived in a sod house.  For several years he was a deputy marshal in El Reno.  He had earlier assisted in fighting the Dalton boys out of Caldwell, Kansas.

          Black came to Oklahoma City in 1905 from Sayre.

Services will be at 1p a.m. Thursday in Perrine funeral home with burial in Spencer cemetery.

 

Black, Thomas N. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Blackard, W. D.  was commissioned in the Northern District of Indian Territory, assigned to the Muskogee court in July of 1890. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) National Archives, Washington, D.C. - Account # 8714)

 

Blake, Harry R.

D.U.S. Marshal

April 2, 1905

 

Blackburn, W. A. served in the Central District in 1894. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Blackmore, John T. was commissioned in Oklahoma Territory by Marshal Fossett, replacing Jim Thompson when he became sheriff of Caddo County in November of 1902. 

(Woodward Bulletin - November 21, 1902)

 

Blake, John was commissioned on June 14, 1894, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George J. Crump.  John Lived in Baker, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Blakemore, William Finley “Fin” Deputy U. S. Marshal

Pioneer Peace Officer Dies

 

January 21, 1949—Pryor—William Finley “Fin” Blakemore, pioneer Muskogee resident and former deputy U. S. marshal, died Thursday in Pryor in the home of a sister, Mrs. A. C. Brewster, where he had made his home the past year.

          Blakemore settled in Muskogee in 1895 and served as deputy marshal under U. S. Judge S. M. Rutherford.  A former justice of the peace, he also held several appointive offices in the county government.

          Survivors include Mrs. Brewster and another sister, Mrs. W. W. Powell, Salina, Oklahoma, and a brother, Dr. J. L. Blakemore, Muskogee.

          Services will be announced by Petering funeral home, Muskogee.

 

Blanding, H. R.

D.U.S. Marshal

Lawton

November 19, 1907

 

Bloomburg, John P. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas in 1889, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes.  John served as bailiff for the Ft. Smith federal court. 

(Hell on the Border - Harman) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Blust, Doc was commissioned in Oklahoma Territory when he worked with fellow Deputy Marshal B. L. Nutting, at Perry protecting the claim office during the 1889 land rush.  Blust and Nutting were assigned to the Hunnewell area.  (Indian Pioneer History - Colonel J. B. Queen)

 

Bobbitt, Allen A. “Gus” was commissioned as deputy marshal in 1888, while living in Center, Chickasaw Nation by Marshal John Hammer.  In 1895 and 1896, Gus was commissioned in the Southern District court Of Indian Territory.  On June 22, 1896, he was summoned to capture fugitive Jim Harbolt.  Jim Harbolt and Jake McKinzie with five other gang members robbed a train near Canadian, Texas, where they were confronted by Sheriff McGehee and his posse.  The sheriff was killed during the altercation and the two outlaws fled to the Cheyenne - Arapaho area where they went on scout.  Several deputy marshals confronted Harbolt near Taloga, Oklahoma Territory where they arrested him without incident.  The court released Harbolt giving him a bail of $1,500.  Harbolt forfeited his bail when he failed to appear before the court for sentencing.  Deputy Marshal Bobbitt trailed Harbolt to the Chickasaw Nation near Pauls Valley where he found the outlaw sleeping in the woods.  Bobbitt slipped up on the sleeping outlaw where he placed his handcuffs on him before he woke up.  Jim Harbolt was taken to jail in Ardmore, Chickasaw Nation which was under the Southern District court, of Paris, Texas.  On February 26, 1909, Gus was returning to his home near Lawrence, Oklahoma riding in his wagon when he was unexpectedly approached by hired gunman, James B. “Killer” Miller.  Bobbitt was hauling a load of feed back to his ranch when he was shot at point blank range by the ruthless Miller’s shotgun.  The blood money paid to Miller for Bobbitt’s life was two thousand dollars.  Bobbitt lived only a short time after being shot.  He could not identify his assassin but was able to describe him and knew that he had been hired by his old enemies, Allen and West.  A mare fitting the description of one ridden by Miller was located near Francis, where Miller’s nephew and brother-in-law lived.   In 1906, Miller bushwhacked Deputy Marshal Ben Collins west of Emet, Oklahoma and killed Sheriff Pat Garrett in 1908, at Los Cruces, New Mexico.  Miller bragged of killing fifty-one men, the first being his grandparents when he was eight years old.  He enjoyed the killing as much as the money that he received for it.  The fame and glory that he craved along with his ability to escape the law made him a real danger to any lawman in the area.  Miller studied the habits of his prey, formed an air tight alibi, and then eliminated them.  Normally he could make his get away without being arrested, then if he was questioned, he could provide witnesses that worked with him to swear that he was not at the scene of the murder.  Miller fled to Ft. Worth, Texas after killing Bobbitt but was extradited back to Ada when a witness testified Miller was seen near the crime scene.   A nephew of the professional killer told of the arrangement to leave the blood money in the bank after the killing and testified that Miller had admitted he had killed Gus Bobbitt.  When Miller was placed in jail at Ada most of the residents felt he would be released and definitely not convicted in the court.  For this reason a group of residents from that town knew it was time to stop Miller.  Three men traveling from Ardmore, arrived by train in Ada to help release Miller, one of them being the well known defense lawyer, Moman Pruitt.  As they arrived, they were met by a grim faced old cattleman who informed them that the next train to leave for Ardmore would be leaving in five minutes and they had better be passengers on it.  The trio sensed what was going to happen and they knew they did not want to be a party in it.  The next train back to Ardmore was leaving just as their train pulled in, which they ran to catch.  Late that night on April 19, 1909, the lights went out in Ada and at the same time a lynching party showed up at the jail.  The lynching party overpowered the jailer, Bob Nestor and seized the four prisoners, Jim Miller, Joe Allen, Jesse West, and Berry Burrell.  Allen and West previously owned a saloon which was built on a raft in the river between the Seminole and Chickasaw Nations where neither Indian Nation held jurisdiction over the liquor sales.  The saloon’s tough guy image drew many a rowdy who wanted to prove himself or gave many a young man the privilege to say that he had been there.  Almost every week a man would be killed in this saloon.  West and Allen were accused of wholesale cattle theft which was investigated by Deputy Marshal Bobbitt.  Eventually the two saloon owners were drawn into several court conflicts which caused the two to flee to west Texas to avoid prosecution.  Burrell was an area livestock dealer who was accused of carrying the pay-off money and spotting Bobbitt for Miller.  Bobbitt felt West and Allen would eventually try to kill him so he set up one thousand dollars in his will to prosecute them.  The four murderers were taken to an old barn near the railroad tracks where they were lynched from the rafters.  Gus Bobbitt was buried in the Rose Hill Cemetery in Ada, Chickasaw Nation. 

(The Ada News - April 18, 1999) (Indian Pioneer History - A. N. Boatman) (Indian Pioneer History - J. H. Hair) (Indian Pioneer History - Jennie Selfridge) (Indian Pioneer History - Jack Snider) (Western Oklahoman - July 10, 1896) (Ghost Town-Tales of Oklahoma) (Encyclopedia of Western Gunfighters) (Ralph Evans - File #1161 Carnegie Library, Ardmore, Oklahoma) (Four Men Hanging) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O .T., 1893 - 1896)

 

DEPUTY MARSHAL BOBBIT IS PAID REWARD MONEY

 

May 5, 1903— The Guthrie Daily Leader--Territorial Auditor Baxter, acting upon the advice of Governor Ferguson, today tendered former Deputy Marshal Bobbitt of Ada, I. T., a warrant for $500, as a reward for his services in apprehension and conviction of Pete Williams a member of the Casey gang and who in 1902 shot and killed Sheriff Smith of Caddo County.  Marshal Bobbitt also caught Ed Moberly, who is now in the federal jail awaiting trial for the same murder, and he will receive an additional reward of $500 should Moberly be convicted of the crime.

 

Boggs, George was commissioned on April 8, 1893, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George J. Crump. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Bohannon, David “Dave served as deputy marshal under Marshal R. B. Regan when the federal court at Paris, Texas took jurisdiction of the southern part of Indian Territory in 1887.    In June of 1888, he killed a whiskey peddler who was in a boxcar with a large amount of whiskey.  During the attempted arrest, the peddler was left mortally wounded in the body and head and died refusing to give his name.  Dave was a prominent Choctaw citizen who had problems with handling his feelings involving politics.  In September of 1893, he became preoccupied in an argument at South McAlester, Choctaw Nation with Ben Foreman who lived near South Canadian.   Foreman was a supporter of Jones, and Bohannon supported Jackson.  Dave Bohannon became so angry in his discussion that he shot Foreman killing him instantly. 

(The Ft. Smith Elevator - June 29, 1888) (The Woodward Jeffersonian - September 30, 1893) (Picture - Leaders And Leading Men Of Indian Territory - Choctaws And Chickasaws))

 

Bolen, Frank was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  He is pictured in the U.S. Marshal reunion at Ft. Smith Arkansas in 1908. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Employee Database) (Picture - The Western Peace Officer)

 

Bolen, Jim was arrested for bank robbery then placed in the Guthrie jail.  Bolen was given his freedom when he gave information revealing the location of an outlaw’s hideout.  The town of Guthrie hired him as a deputy sheriff where he proved to be a good lawman.  In 1906, Marshal Jack Abernathy commissioned Bolen as deputy marshal in the Western District of Oklahoma Territory

 (Indian Pioneer History - E. Fowler)

 

Boles, A. H. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, where he served as special deputy.  (Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Boles, Seth was commissioned on January 10, 1884, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Thomas Boles. 

(Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Bolton, P. A. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Bond, S. W. was commissioned as a deputy marshal on April 21, 1888, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes.  In July and August of 1894 he was a posse man in the Northern District of Indian Territory.  Bond was living at Miami, Oklahoma in 1930. 

(Indian Pioneer History - W.F. Jones) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Experience Of A U.S. Deputy Marshal) (U.S. Deputy Marshals - 1893 - 1896) (National Archives, Washington, D.C. - Account # 8714 & 11959)

 

Bonner, was assigned to the Vinita District in 1900.  Deputy Marshals Ledbetter, Lewis and Bonner divided a reward of $2000 for breaking up the Jennings Gang.

The reward was paid by the railroad and express companies. 

(The Antlers Democrat - January 26, 1900)

 

Booker, David, E. “Dave” worked out of the Southern District court at Paris, Texas from 1895 through 1898, under Marshal J. Shelby Williams.  In November of 1891, Dave arrested Charles Sealy, charged with horse stealing.   Booker transported a Mrs. Keys to the federal court in Paris, Texas where she was a witness for the court.   On February 15th of 1894, four men entered a store in Rex, Chickasaw Nation, and thirty five miles west of Ardmore to commit a robbery.  Three of the robbers covered several customers while the fourth thief robbed the store of its money and merchandise.  Their next target became the post office where afterwards all the money and merchandise was put into bags and placed on their horses.  All of the victims were taken from the town by horseback into heavy timber, a mile or two from Rex where they were held until the outlaws made their escape.  Deputy Marshals Booker and C.R. Denton trailed them until they captured W. E. Reece and John Bowland who were taken to jail in Ardmore to be held until they were later taken to court in Paris, Texas.  Accounts show that on June 7, 1894, Booker rode with fellow deputies, J. H. Leatherman, C. R. Denton, J. M. Reynolds, Loss Hart and W. B. Freeman to capture Bill Dalton, second in command in the Bill Doolin gang.  Bill Dalton was regarded as a dangerous and notorious outlaw who reward was to be paid either “Dead Or Alive”.  In November of 1896, Dave worked with Deputy Marshal Burch searching for the killers of W.W. Hambree, a farmer living near Marietta, Chickasaw Nation.  The deputy marshals investigated the murder scene for three days which gave evidence that indicated the persons involved in the killing were still close-by.  In another case, Dave served a warrant of arrest to a man named Robinson, who was a farmer who killed a man named T. S. Vick during a feud which occurred six miles east of Sulphur Springs.  Robinson was taken to Pauls Valley for a preliminary hearing.  In 1899, Deputy Marshal Booker arrested John Edward who was charged with the killing of Richard McSwain.  McSwain was taken to jail in Ardmore where he was held for trial.   While working with Deputy Marshal J. A. Hutchins in 1902, Dave killed Doug McAlister at Nickel Hill.  McAlister was a whiskey runner who swore he would not be taken alive.  Dave was riding the Santa Fe train near Thackerville when Deputy Marshal Tom Smith was killed in an argument when several Negroes questioned why the deputy marshals were riding in the colored passenger car.  Tom Smith’s killer was killed when Dave Booker became involved in the gunfight. 

(The Territorial Topic - November 5, 1891) (The Woodward News - November 13, 1896) (Marietta Monitor - November 19, 1896, September 3, 1897) (The Antlers Democrat - March 29, 1901) (The Taloga Tomahawk - March 15, 1894) (The Enid Weekly Sun - February 9, 1899) (Selden Lindsay) (West of Hell’s Fringe) (Frontier Trail) (Black Red and Deadly) (Ralph Evans - File #1161 - Carnegie Library Ardmore, Oklahoma) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Booker, D. E.

D.U.S. Marshal

Ardmore

1897

Booth, O. S.

D.U.S. Marshal

 

September 11, 1906 to June 30, 1907

 

Boothe, O. S. was commissioned in the Western District of Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  He was assigned to the Tulsa area in 1906, replacing Deputy Marshal W. E. Wooten who resigned.  Booth was a former mayor of Carrollton, Missouri.

(Experiences of A U.S. Deputy Marshal) (Indian Pioneer History - W.F. Jones) (The Bennington Tribune - September 20, 1906)

 

Boston, John R.  was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  In July of 1881, Boston followed seven horse thieves from McAlester and overtook them twenty miles northwest of Denison in the Chickasaw Nation, where he arrested two of the thieves who had fourteen head of horses, and was soon overtaken by the other five thieves who murdered him and left the horses.  The last seen of the thieves they were making good time in the direction of ft. Sill with no one in pursuit. 

(Indian Journal, Muskogee - July 21, 1881)   Killed in the line of duty.

 

Bottom, W. N. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Bouden, William was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  He rode with Deputy Marshals Milo Creekmore, Charlie Copeland and David Rusk to try to capture outlaw Ned Christie who had killed one deputy marshal and wounded two others in three separate incidents.  Bouden and Milo Creekmore tried to capture Christie on two occasions but Ned Christie was not to be captured.  

(Hell on the Border - Harman) (Black Red and Deadly) (Ft. Smith Federal Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

OUTLAWS ARRESTED

Prisoners Brought To Fort Gibson By U. S. Marshals

 

November 2, 1894—Indian JournalFort Gibson, I. T. Oct. 29—Deputy Marshal Bouden and posse have come in with two prisoners suppose to belong to the cook gang.  One of them give his name as Jim Price, and is identified as the man who jumped his bond at Paris Texas eight months ago.  He was on bond for stealing horses and disappeared a few days before his trial.

          The other says that his name is Lon Perry, but it is believed from the description given that he is really Perry Brown, and on of the Cook gang.

          Marshal Bouden and his men had been after him for two days, and last night located him in the mountains eight or ten miles north of this place, and shortly after dark began to close in on him.  Perry eluded them and started across the prairie in the direction of Wagoner.  He had gone but a little way when he ran into some of Bouden’s men who were approaching from that side.

          He drew his pistol, but the officers were to quick for him and had him covered with a half dozen Winchesters before he could use it.  Realizing that he was trapped he gave up his gun.  He insists that he not the man wanted, but the officers say tht they have criminating evidence against him and proceeded to Fort Smith tonight.

          John Beck, Deputy United States Marshal, wired the authorities at Muskogee today that five of the Cook gag were arrested near Sapulpa, an that the officers were in pursuit of the others.

          A report reached here this morning that there had been a fight between the officers and the Cook gang near Wagoner, and that four bandits had been caught.  It was a mistake and was caused by the arrest of six men, who were supposed to be harboring the bandits.

          Lou cook, sister of Bill Cook, was arrested din this place today and was taken to Fort Smith tonight.

          Jim Cook, brother of the notorious outlaw, Bill Cook, whose trial came up today at Tahlequah, I. T., had his case continued until November 13.  This has proven one of the most expensive trials the Nation has ever undertaken, as it has been continued three times before.

 

Boudinet, R. was commissioned on August 26, 1892, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Bourland, Jack “Captain”    

(Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Bourland, James C. “Jim” served as deputy marshal under Marshal Jack Abernathy in the Western District of Oklahoma Territory.  In 1906 and 1907, Bourland was in charge of the Anadarko District.  The Marietta Monitor reported on June 1, 1906, Marshal Jack Abernathy received word that Jim Bourland had a street duel with Weston Fred Hudson, an notorious outlaw and ex-member of the Bert Casey Gang.  Hudson received severe wounds to both legs, while Bourland was mortally wounded, dying a few hours after being shot.   Hudson had previously been released after being acquitted of the killing of Deputy Marshal Lute Houston near Swan Lake in 1892.  Hudson was held as a witness for Jim and Ben Hughes who were acquitted in the same trial.  Fred Hudson and Ed Lockett, outlaws in the Bert Casey gang were in jail when Casey fled the Anadarko and Wichita Mountain area.  Marshal Fossett gave the two incarcerated outlaws an opportunity to get out of jail and have all old criminal charges dropped if they brought in Bert Casey.  They joined Casey and another fugitive named James Simms who were planning to rob the bank at Cleo, Oklahoma Territory.  The night before the planned robbery, Fred Hudson killed Casey and Simms when they resisted arrest.  Hudson left Oklahoma Territory, going to Arkansas, where he became involved in another murder.  Hudson was acquitted in the trial and when he returned to Oklahoma Bourland tried to have him tried for the murder of Dr. Bean Blossom’s son who was killed in Caddo County.  Marshal Fossett gave amnesty to Hudson when he was released from jail to try to capture Bert Casey, an act that did not make the citizens of Caddo County very happy because they still remembered the robbery and killing of the Bean Blossom family.  When Hudson was excused from the charges, Bourland confronted him and told him he was going to make him testify against Jim Hughes who was being held for trial.  A gun duel pursued in the streets of Lawton leaving Bourland dead and Hudson critically injured.  Oklahombres shows Deputy Marshal Bourland being killed on duty May 24, 1906.  

(Marietta Monitor - June 1, 1906) (The Seiling Guide - May 31, 1906) (Picture - Shoot from the Lip) (Gunman’s Territory) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)   Killed in the line of duty.

 

A PISTOL DUEL

Popular Jim Bourland Is Shot Down by Fred Hudson, Former, Outlaw

Tragedy Was At Anadarko

Bourland Has Been Threatened by Desperadoes for Years—Wanted the Sheriffship

 

May  24, 1906—The Daily Oklahoman—Guthrie, Oklahoma—John R. Abernathy, United States marshal, received a telegram this morning announcing that Deputy Marshal Jim Bourland of Anadarko, had been shot and fatally wounded by Fred Hudson, the ex-outlaw and former member of the Bert Casey band of desperadoes.  Hudson was also shot by Bourland and will die.  Hudson was only recently released from custody, being acquitted of killing Deputy Marshal Lute Houston, near Swan Lake in 1892.  He was held, however, as a witness against Jim and Ben Hughes, who were also acquitted of the killing yesterday at Hobart.

          Bit little is known here, as yet, regarding the double killing today at Anadarko.  Bourland was a very popular officer and for five years past outlaws have threatened his life.  He was a candidate for the next democratic nomination for sheriff of Caddo County, but has served as a deputy marshal several years.  Fed Hudson came into prominence three years ago by killing Bert Casey, the outlaw king, at Cleo Springs.  Hudson being commissioned as a deputy marshal in order to capture Casey, dead or alive.  A few months ago, he was acquitted in Arkansas, of murdering a man.

 

Boushee, Frank P. was commissioned on October 23, 1894, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George J. Crump.  Frank was assigned to the Muskogee District Court, living in Muskogee, Indian Territory. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Bousman, Louis Phillip was commissioned in 1881, in the Western District of Arkansas at Ft. Smith serving under Marshal Valentine Dell .  He lived in Fleetwood, Chickasaw Nation. 

(Indian Pioneer History - Sarah Eldora “Cruce” Bousman)

 

Bowden, Charles L.  was commissioned on May 31, 1889, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes.  He was working with Deputy Marshal Williams in May of 1890.  The deputy marshals traveled from Ft. Smith into Indian Territory to arrest seven prisoners and transport them to the federal court in Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  Six of the prisoners were arrested for introducing whiskey into Indian Territory.   The other prisoner, Harve Cake, committed murder in Missouri, then fled to Indian Territory where he tried to hide from the law.  He escaped from the deputy marshals before they got him to Ft. Smith, Arkansas.   Introducing whiskey into Indian Territory was a real problem.  The court recognized liquor as playing a big part in most of the murder and rape cases.  From February to June of 1890, Deputy Marshal Bowden made eleven arrests for introducing and other whiskey violations.  Three white men were arrested for intruding into Indian Territory and one Negro, Joe Caesar, was arrested for larceny.  Oklahombres reports Bowden was killed on duty between the years 1889 to 1897. 

(Indian Pioneer History - William H. Bullard) (Indian Citizen - February 15, April 12, May 10, 17, 24, & June 28, 1890)  (The Weekly Elevator - May 9, 1890; August 12, 1892) (Oklahombres) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)   Killed in the  line of duty.

 

Bowden, Charles L.

D.U.S. Marshal

 

July 1, 1896

Bowden, Charles L.

D.U.S. Marshal

Ft. Gibson, I. T.

1897

 

Bowers, Joe was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, under Marshal Thomas Boles.  In May of 1885, Deputy Marshal Maples was killed when he was ambushed by Ned Christie.  Joe Bowers was summoned to serve a warrant of arrest to Ned Christie near Rabbit Trap in the Going Snake District.  As Bowers rode into an area of heavy undergrowth searching for Ned Christie, he passed by Christie who was waiting in ambush for him.  The Cherokee outlaw fired at point blank range seriously wounding Bowers in the leg.  The Alva Pioneer reported that Joe Bowers was killed by U.S. Deputy Marshal Joe Pentecost at Guthrie.  Pentecost had been placed in jail at Guthrie but was transferred to Oklahoma City in fear that he would be lynched. 

(The Weekly Elevator - November 17, 1893) (The Alva Pioneer - December 23, 1898) (Encyclopedia of Western Gun-Fighters) (Heck Thomas) (Black, Red, And Deadly) (Indian Pioneer History - Stanley A. Clarke) (Outlaws and Peace Officers Of Indian Territory) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Bowers, John A. was commissioned in 1863, serving in the District Court at Van Buren, Arkansas under Marshal Samuel Hays. 

(Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Bowers, John H. was commissioned on December 28, 1868, in the District Court at Van, Buren, Arkansas, under Marshal Joseph Rowland. 

(Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) 

 

Bowers, S. was commissioned on May 29, 1893, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George J. Crump.  Bowers lived in Siloam Springs, Arkansas.  (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Bowers, S.

D.U.S. Marshal

July 1, 1896

 

 

Bowling H. E. was commissioned in the Southern District of Indian Territory at Paris, Texas under Marshal Sheb Williams and lived four miles north of Allen on the South Canadian River.  Deputy Marshal Bowling came to Indian Territory in 1894, where he was headquartered at Stonewall, Chickasaw Nation and later moved to Center, Chickasaw Nation.   Bowling was summoned to attend the “Lamenting of the Dead”, the Last Cry of the Chickasaw Days.  Relatives of the dead met at the cemetery where they mourned their dead as if they had just died.  The participants engaged in self inflicted torture which raised them to a very high level of agony and pain.  Deputy Marshal Bill McCall was working with Bowling between 1894 and 1898 when the two came across a tough who was part Indian and Negro.  This man named Bruner Indian denied his Negro blood and was probably the toughest man that either marshal had ever come across. McCall gave chase to the bruiser following him into the woods where he soon lost him.  The Indian approached him from the rear shooting him in the back.  The fallen officer seemed only slightly wounded as he fell to the ground but soon died of his wounds. 

(Indian Pioneer History - H. E. Bowling)   Killed in the line of duty.

 

Bowman, Ed S. served in the Central District in 1895, serving under Marshal James J. McAlester.  The Ft. Smith oaths show Bowman being commissioned on February 4, and July 7, 1896.  His residence was shown at Oak Lodge, Indian Territory. 

(Indian Pioneer History - Jim Beagle) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Bowman, George E. was commissioned in Oklahoma Territory in 1894, serving under Marshal Evett Nix. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Bowman, Leo  was commissioned at Newkirk, Oklahoma Territory in 1894, serving under Marshal Evett Nix. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Bowman, O. H.  was commissioned in Oklahoma Territory in 1894, serving under Marshal Evitt Nix.

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Bowman or Bauman, Wes was a commissioned deputy marshal from Johnson County Arkansas, working out of the Western District in Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  Wes Bowman was one of the sixteen deputy marshals that rode to Ned’s Mountain Fort, Cherokee Nation where Ned Christie was killed on November 2 or 3, 1892.  When Christies’ fort was blown up he tried to escape and fired his Winchester rifle hastily at Bowman as he ran past.  The rifle was so close to Bowman face that he received powder burns.  Bowman fired at the escaping Christie striking him behind the ear, killing him on the spot.   Note:  Refer to the “Capture of Ned Christie” for more information. 

(Black Red and Deadly) (Hell on the Border - Harmon) (Picture - Muskogee Genealogical Society) (Picture - Iron Men) (Picture - 1880 to 1890 - Heck Thomas) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Box, Elihu R. was commissioned on July 9, 1889, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes.  On June 26, 1890, he was killed by R. E. Boutwed and John C. Ball in the Chickasaw Nation trying to serve a warrant of arrest.  Both men were convicted and sentenced to be executed on December 19, 1890 at Paris, Texas. 

(Ft. Smith Elevator - July 25, 1890) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office)

 

Boyd, J. J. was commissioned on July 24, 1893, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes. 

(Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Boyer, W. C. was commissioned in the Southern District court, at Paris, Texas in 1897.  Deputy Marshal Boyer served under Marshal John S. Hammer for four years and was assigned to the Ardmore area.  After serving as field marshal Boyer became jailer at Purcell where he served for four years.  W. C. Boyer was a resident of Indian Territory for thirty-three years. 

(Picture - Notable Men of Indian Territory)

 

Boyle, Joe was commissioned in the Western District at Ft, Smith, Arkansas, under Marshal George C. Crump.  He was killed while on duty in 1896. 

(Oklahombres) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)  Killed in the line of duty.

 

Boyle, John F. rode with Deputy Marshal George Stormer in March of 1895, attempting to capture a half breed Osage Indian horse thief named Jim Campbell.  Two deputy marshals approached a cabin a few miles north of Pawnee where they expected to find Campbell.  The two deputy marshals surrounded the cabin finding that Campbell was sleeping.  Campbell became aware of his captors which caused him to flee from the cabin, still dressed in his night clothing. Carrying his Winchester rifle, he ran to his horse which he quickly mounted and fled from the deputy marshals.  The lawmen followed in fast pursuit forcing a running gunfight as they gave chase.  Campbell escaped when one of the officers had his horse shot out from under him. 

(The Woodward Jeffersonian - March 16, 1895) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Bradshaw, Samuel, was commissioned on July 30, 1872, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Logan S. Roots.  Samuel lived in Sebastian County, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Oaths of Office)

 

Bradshaw, W. W.   was appointed as field deputy marshal for the Coalgate area in April of 1904, by Marshal George K. Pritchard of the Central District.  In February of 1906, officer Bradshaw arrested Jim Faught at Coalgate who was charged with the murder of an aged woman from Pulaski, Tennessee.  In September of 1905, Bradshaw was working out of Atoka, Choctaw Nation where he arrested George Meeks who was feuding with his brothers over cultivating crops, near Big Cedar.  On April 25, 1905, Bradshaw was selected field deputy marshal of the Atoka court by Marshal George K. Pritchard of the Central District.  In April of 1905, Hiram Bolen a blacksmith from Coalgate, Indian Territory became engaged in an altercation with Harry Whitledge.  Whitledge shot Bolen twice with his pistol, one of the shots striking Bolen in the heart, which killed him instantly.  Deputy Marshal Bradshaw arrested Whitledge, taking him to Atoka, for a preliminary hearing.  In the spring of 1906, Bradshaw was living in Coalgate when he was driving his team and wagon down a road, meeting four bandits.  They opened fire on Bradshaw, shooting at point blank range.  Bradshaw, badly wounded, with his team shot, was left on the road to die.  A passer-by came to Bradshaw aid and reported the shooting in Coalgate. The deputy marshal was seriously injured but recovered from his wounds. Bradshaw identified one of the bandits as a person he had arrested some time ago and felt the shooting was an act of revenge. 

(The Choctaw News - June 2, 1904) (Marietta Monitor - February 6, 1905)  (The Antlers News - September 22, 1905) (The Durant Times - April 21, 1905) (The Sterrett Sun - May 25, 1906) 

 

Bradshaw, W. W.

D.U.S. Marshal

July 1, 1906 to August 1, 1906

 

A Deputy U. S.  Marshal Has Been Let Out Of The Job

 

August 4 1906--Colgate, Indian Territory--William Bradshaw, who has been United States Deputy Marshal for a number of years, located at Colgate, has been removed as such by the higher authorities.  The charge against the deputy being that he was not strict in the enforcement of the law prohibiting the manufacture of beer and other beverages by parties who live here.

          Colgate is chiefly a mining town and a large percent of minors is of a foreign element, many of whom make for their own use a beer, called "Chock," the ingredients of which are malt, sugar and hops and proper proportions.  These minors, as a rule, drink a pointer to this beer upon their return from the minds in the afternoon, and it is a rare instance when one of them drinks a sufficient amount of it to cause him to feel the slightest intoxication.  Many of them claim it to be necessary for their health after working in the man all day.

          Occasionally several special deputy marshals from South McAllister and other places will salute down on Colgate for no other purpose then to destroy "in any way they can" all the beer they can find and then arrested prosecute all parties and whose position any beer was found.  Only a few days ago a crowd of such deputies arrested 16 minors at Lehigh, a small-town 5 mi. south of here, and carried them before the United States District Court.

 

Bradshaw, Samuel was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Brady, W. A. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Braidwood, Thomas P.

D.U.S. Marshal

Beaver

November 19, 1907

 

Brandon, was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas around 1876, when he was summoned to the Osage Nation to serve a warrant of arrest for horse stealing.  Unknown parties in the Osage tribe had stolen horses from a white man so Brandon went to the Agent, asking the main chief, Big Chief to hold some of the Osage tribal leaders hostage until they told who stole the horses.  One of the wanted men was the son of Big Chief’s dead brother and it was hard to turn him in but he knew his honor was at stake so he ordered the young men charged with the crime to go to Ft. Smith to stand trial. 

(Chronicle Of Oklahoma - Volume 40, 1962)

 

Branson, William served in the Central District in 1894. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Brasher, Walter. G. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Braswell, S. B.  was commissioned on April 3, 1892, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes. 

(Ft. Smith Oaths of Office)

 

Brazell, Dow worked in the Southern District of Indian Territory at Ardmore.  An aged, Dow Braziel was killed in a restaurant in Ardmore, Chickasaw Nation in 1898, by a younger lawman, Bud Ballew.  Bud Ballew and the chief of police from Ardmore entered the cafe where Dow Brazell became involved in a gun fight with the two.  Different accounts of the gun battle make it unclear why the incident happened.  The police report showed that Dow Braziel fired two rounds from his revolver and Bud Ballew emptied his pistol firing six rounds.  Braziel’s body was hit by all six rounds which struck him on the top of the head, one on the left arm, another on the left arm above the elbow and another below the elbow, one wound on the heel and the wound which caused his death was a bullet through the liver and kidneys on the right side of the body.  Neither Buck Ballew, nor the police chief were hit by either bullet fired by Dow Brazell which was fired at very close range.  Buck Ballew was serving as deputy sheriff under Sheriff, Buck Garrett when the incident occurred.  Either by fate or justice, Buck Ballew was killed some twenty four years later in Wichita Falls, Texas by another lawman.

(Oklahombres)

 

Former Officer Killed By Deputy

Old Rivalry Is Given As Cause for Killing

 

January 31, 1919—Ardmore, OK—Deputy Sheriff Bud Ballew of Wilson is in the county jail tonight as the result of the killing early today of Dow Brazell of Ardmore, formerly a deputy United States marshal.  The shooting was the outcome of an old-time feud growing out of official activities in regard to bootlegging.

          Brazell was shot to death in a café on Main Street after firing two shots at Ballew, who emptied his six-shooter, each of the bullets striking Ballew.

 

Brazell, Ed N. served in the Central District in 1894 and 1895, under Marshal James J. McAlester. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Brazell, James L. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes.  He was summoned in 1892, from the McAlester court to go to the Choctaw courthouse in Wilburton to stop the execution of Silon Lewis, a Choctaw Indian who was convicted of murder in the Choctaw Nation court.  The murder resulted from a political dispute.  President Cleveland granted a stay of execution to Lewis but the stay came too late.  Deputy Brazell was chosen to deliver the stay to the court.  Brazell used three horses to make the trip of forty miles.  When he arrived at Wilburton, Silon Lewis was setting on a coffin with his executioner standing by at a close distance awaiting orders to execute Lewis.  The Indian courts method of execution was by firing squad or being shot by a single executioner.  The Lighthorsemen performed the duties of the executioner by placing a blindfold on the convicted person, a white heart was placed over his heart, and the executioner would shoot the convicted person in the heart.  The Choctaw Supreme Court reviewed the case but he was still found guilty.  The execution was held on November 5, 1894.  On December 1, 1894, while living in Harthshorne, Indian Territory, he was commissioned as deputy marshal by Marshal George Crump.  In 1896, Jim rode with Deputy Marshals Jim Cole and Charles Baird to Denton Mills, twenty-five miles southeast of McAlester where they had a conflict with an escaped outlaw named Harris and another man unknown to the lawmen.  A running gunfight forced the outlaws into the timber where they left their horses and escaped on foot leaving a Winchester rifle, burglar tools and a pistol, which was taken from jailer, William Weaver, when Harris escaped from jail.  James was sworn into the Northern District in 1897, and 1898.  He became a wealthy and influential citizen of the Choctaw Nation where he owned a lumber company and bank.  James Brazell was still alive in 1930, making his residence in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 

(The Woodward News - June 5, 1896) (The Enid Daily Wave - May 6, 1896) (Indian Pioneer History - Nellie Hardin) (Indian Pioneer History - W.F. Jones) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Picture-Experience Of A U.S. Deputy Marshal) (Justice for All) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Brazell, James L. 

D.U.S. Marshal

South McAlester

1897

 

Braven, F. M. served in the Central District in 1895, under Marshal James J. McAlester. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Brecker, A. R. was commissioned in the Northern District of Indian Territory, serving under Marshal W H. Darrough.  (File #10, Indian Library, Oklahoma Historical Society)

 

Breker, A. R.

D.U.S. Marshal

July 1, 1906, to July 25,1906 

 

Brents, T. E. “Ed of Ada, Chickasha Nation arrested several men who were charged with handling whiskey in Indian Territory.  Brents confiscated property valued at $50 which he took from whiskey peddlers and turned it over to the U.S. Government. This was the first incident of taking personal property from a criminal in Indian Territory. 

(The Arapaho Bee - December 23, 1904) (Picture, Volume 11, Number 4 - Oklahombres)

 

Brents, Edward

D.U.S. Marshal

Ada

August 26, 1902

Brents, Edward

D.U.S. Marshal

Ada

February 19, 1906

Brents, T. E. "Ed"

D.U.S. Marshal

Ada

August 26, 1902

 

Brentz, Edward

D.U.S. Marshal

1907

 

Brewer, F. M. was commissioned on August 4, 1886, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal John Carroll.  He served in the Central District from 1894 thru 1896, under Marshal James J. McAlester.  (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Brewer, F. M.

D.U.S. Marshal

Talihina

1897

 

Brewer, F. W. served in the Central District from 1894 thru 1895, under Marshal James J. McAlester. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Brice, Deputy Marshals Cummings, and Chapman of Ada passed through Madill, Chickasaw Nation, in August of 1905, enroute to Ardmore with Clarence Brown who was charged with the killing of his brother, mother and the wounding of his stepfather.  Brown, a full blooded Chickasaw Indian, wanted to control the family land allotments.  A quarrel started when his mother told him the family did not want him to be in charge of the allotments which caused him to go berserk.  The infuriated Clarence Brown pulled his pistol, shooting his mother in the leg and breast, critically wounding her.  Clarence’s brother tried to stop the attack on his mother but fell to the same fate as she.  After killing his mother and brother, the maniac pursued his unarmed stepfather who was unable to defend himself.  His only hope was to runaway from his stepson which failed when he was shot in the back.  As he fell to the ground he played dead waiting for Clarence to leave the scene so he could get help from a nearby neighbor.  The deputy marshals were summoned to place Clarence Brown under arrest in the Ardmore jail. 

(Marietta Monitor - August 25, 1905)

 

Bridges Jack L.  was commissioned in Kansas working out of the Wichita Court, assigned to the Hays area in 1869 to 1876 working under Marshals Dana Houston and William S. Tough.  The first account of Jack Bridges was in October of 1869 when Bridges and another Kansas deputy marshal arrested Bob Connors for killing a drover at Pond City.  They feared mob violence from the residents of Hays City so they lodged their prisoner in the jail at Fort Hays.    (Letter from Major George Gibson, Fort Hays to Kansas Governor James M. Harvey)  One of his most famed arrests occurred in February of 1871 when Jack accompanied the Kansas 5th Calvary from Ft. Harker to Wichita, Kansas to arrest J. E. Ledford, the proprietor of the Harris House of that city on charges of resisting U.S. troops.  Ledford had previous warning federal officers and troops were on their way to accost him so he hid in an outhouse near the Harris House.  However, his hiding spot did not remain secret very long for he was sighted when he entered the privy.  A lieutenant and army scout Lee Steward joined officer Bridges in trying to arrest their foe but their command to surrender was met with Ledford opening the door and rushing them with blazing pistols.  After emptying their weapons the three officers ran for cover but Bridges dash was cut short when he fell, fainting from the serious wounds that he received from the fight.  Ledford did not fare as well since he succumbed to the mortal wounds caused when scout Steward shot him in the back as he fled from the crapper.  Before dying he was able to make it to a store where a local doctor tried to treat the four gunshot wounds he received but died within a half-hour.  (Eldorado Valley Times - March 3, 1871)  Since Bridges worked the western part of Kansas he was often called to work with the Calvary at Fort Supply to curtail certain Indian attacks on white persons and transport them to Kansas jails to stand trial for their deeds.  This often required that he work with U.S. Deputy Marshal Ben Williams “The Frontier Marshal” who was respected among the Comanche, Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes.  On one occasion, Indian Agent John D. Miles requested Jack Bridges serve warrants to certain Indians who had violated the intercourse laws of the Cheyenne and Arapaho agency.  Fourteen tribesmen from the Cheyenne-Arapaho tribe were arrested and transported to Topeka, Kansas.  Bridges was born in Maine in 1839. 

(Topeka Daily Commonwealth - March 4, 1873)  In 1882 he took the assignment of Marshal of Dodge City and served most of his life being a peace officer in Kansas.  (Dodge City Times - June 29; July 13, 27, 1882, October 4, 1883)  (Why The West Was Wild)

 

Bridges, James “Jim” tracked a band of outlaws that were suspected to have killed Sheriff A. J. Bullard and his under sheriff Coburn of Roger Mills County on June 30, 1902.   In June of 1902, Bridges and officer Crisswell arrested two Negro horse thieves near Wapanuka, Indian Territory.  During the arrest one of the robbers was shot in the mouth leaving him seriously wounded. Deputy Marshal Bridges and his posse overtook them near Duncan, Chickasaw Nation where they were attacked by the outlaws.   After a brief gun battle two of the outlaws surrendered while the rest of the gang escaped.  During the gang’s hurried escape, several stolen horses were left behind.  Bridges was not quite as lucky in trying to serve a warrant of arrest, in June of 1902, when he was seriously wounded while pursuing a gang of horse thieves near Tishomingo, Chickasaw Nation.  Several bands of horse thieves found it profitable to steal horses in the western part of the Chickasaw Nation and take them to northern Texas.  Before returning to Indian Territory they would steal horses from Texas and sell them to the wealthy Chickasaw Indians, where the horses were in great demand.  In May of 1905, Deputy Marshal Bridges traveled to the Dead Fall Saloon to arrest C.A. and S.T. Copeland.  The saloon was located on the Texas side of Red River just across from Burneyville, Chickasaw Nation. The place had a bad name, being frequented by toughs or young men who came there to look for trouble or just to say that they had been there.  Word that the marshal was coming was received by the Copelands causing them to depart to avoid being arrested.  The officer met the Copelands and a chase resulted in which Bridge’s team spooked, running away.  His wagon was completely demolished enabling John Copeland, a third brother to escape capture.  The other two brothers were captured and were taken to jail in Ardmore where they waited for trial.  James resigned his position as deputy marshal in July of 1906 being replaced at Tishomingo, Chickasaw Nation, by S.W. Jones. 

(Indian Pioneer History - Lee Morgan) (The Woodward Bulletin - July 11, 1902) (The Seiling Guide - September 18, 1902) (Ft. Smith Elevator - November 14, 1902) (Marietta Monitor - June 2, 1905) (Lenora Leader - August 3, 1906)

 

Bridges, James H. "Jim"

D.U.S. Marshal

Tishomingo

September 1, 1906

 

Bridgman, William was commissioned on September 29, 1886, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal John Carroll. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office)

 

Brimage, John W.  was commissioned on July 8, 1886, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes. 

(Ft. Smith Oaths of Office)

 

Brittian, D. L. was commissioned on January 16, 1895, in the Western District of Arkansas, serving under Marshal George Crump.  Brittian lived in Wewoka, Indian Territory. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Brock, Zebidiah served as deputy marshal in the Ryan area until he resigned when his pay was cut from $100 to $60.  The Ryan community regarded Brock as a good officer.  Brock remained in the Ryan area after his resignation.   (Marietta Monitor - August 9, 1898)

 

Brock, Z.

D.U.S. Marshal

Ryan

January 29, 1898

Brock, Z.

D.U.S. Marshal

Ryan

February 3, 1902

 

Brockington, was commissioned in the Southern District of Indian Territory at Paris, Texas, under Marshal Sheb Williams.  On June 9, 1895, when he rode with a posse that tried to capture the Christian Gang.  An extensive search was being made for the outlaws who were wanted for the killing of Oklahoma City

Police Chief, Milt Jones when they escaped jail.  The lawmen’s search never located the Christian gang but it did eliminate two thieves from Indian Territory. Will Stevenson, a Negro, was killed when he resisted arrest and Dick Sanger was arrested. 

(Black Red and Deadly)

 

Brockman, W. J. was appointed to Oklahoma Territory assigned to the Stillwater District in February of 1896.  Marshal Patrick S. Nagle made the appointment when he replaced Marshal Evett Nix.

(West Of Hell’s Fringe) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Brockman, W. J.

D.U.S. Marshal

Stillwater

1897

 

Brogan, John M.  was commissioned at Shawnee, Oklahoma Territory in 1895, serving under Marshal Evett Nix.  (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Brooks, D. E. was commissioned in the Southern District of Indian Territory at Paris, Texas, under Marshal Sheb Williams.  In October of 1891, he served a warrant to a Creek Indian, John Smith, who was charged with murdering a man named Hammond. 

(The Territorial Topic - October 29, 1891)

 

Brothers, Williams was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Brown, captured a Creek Indian named John Wootka who murdered Isom Deer at Eufaula, Indian Territory in August of 1897.  The Eufaula District Judge of the Creek Indian court sentenced Wootka to be shot on June 15, 1897, but he escaped from the jail before his sentence was carried out.  Deputy Marshal Brown returned the fugitive to the Indian police in Eufaula where he was executed by being shot. 

(The Woodward News - September 3, 1897) (Indian Pioneer History - Thomas D. Bell)

 

Brown, A. B. “Burt  was first commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, under Marshal Thomas Boyles.  In 1894, he was commissioned by Marshal Sheb Williams in the Southern District Court of Indian Territory at Paris, Texas.  It was recorded in the Indian Champion that he captured two men in the Choctaw Nation in 1884, and transported them to the federal court in Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  In March of 1890, Deputy Marshal Brown was working in the Chickasaw Nation when he came across notorious outlaw Jim Harbolt who was wanted for the murder of Giles Flippin on December 26, 1888, along the Chisholm Trail near the Duncan Store.  He transported his prisoner to the federal court in Paris, Texas. 

(Indian Champion - July 26, 1884) (Ft. Smith Elevator - May 9, 1890) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Brown. A. W. was commissioned on January 5, 1889, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes.  He later served in Oklahoma Territory in 1894, under Marshal Evett Dumas Nix. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office)

 

Brown, E. E. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Brown, E. L. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Brown, Eugene  worked out of the Woodward District in Oklahoma Territory, under Marshal Evett Nix.  In April of 1895, Deputy Marshals Brown and Fink traveled through Taloga, Oklahoma Territory on their way back to Woodward.  In September of 1897, Eugene Brown was riding with his posse when they came upon two men that had nine horses they had stolen from Coolidge.  As Brown’s posse neared the horse thieves they tried to escape but were quickly overtaken.  The horse thieves were taken to jail in Garden City, Kansas.  

(Taloga Advocate - April 27, 1895) (The Woodward News - September 24, 1897)

 

Brown, George H. was commissioned on November 20, 1868, in the District Court at Van Buren, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Joseph Rowland.  Joseph was commissioned again on July 9, 1872 in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Logan Roots.  George lived in Sebastian County, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Brown, James D.  was commissioned on June 29, 1891 in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes.

(Ft. Smith Oaths of Office)

 

Brown, John A. served in the Southern District federal court at Purcell, Chickasaw Nation.  Deputy Marshal Brown was appointed on October 1, 1891, by Marshal John Hammer.

(Purcell Federal Court Records, pg. 461) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office)

 

Brown, John A.

D.U.S. Marshal

July 1, 1918 to March 30, 1919

 

Brown, John D. was commissioned in the Western District of Arkansas at Ft. Smith, under Marshal James S Fagan in 1875, living near Stigler. 

(Indian Pioneer History - S.C. Brown) (Indian Pioneer History - S.R. Lewis) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Brown, John L. was first commissioned as a deputy marshal on October 22, 1894, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, living in Vian, Indian Territory.  In July of 1895 and January of 1896, he was commissioned in the Northern District of Indian Territory, assigned to the Muskogee court.  In December of 1898, John was given a warrant of arrest to serve to Moses Miller who had killed a merchant in Braggs, Indian Territory.  Miller’s reputation was such that very few lawmen wanted to come against him. He had been indicted for the murder of Red Cloud Brown, John Brown’s son and was charged with numerous other crimes.  Brown devised a plan to capture the outlaw without becoming engaged in a gun fight with him.  He was aware of some of Miller’s vices, so he staged a dance in a one room cabin.  Miller entered the cabin where a maiden gave a bottle of whiskey to him which led to an evening of drinking leaving Miller quite drunk and placing him in a defenseless condition.  Watching through a window, John Brown knew it was time to go into the cabin to make the arrest. He was taken to jail in Muskogee, Indian Territory.  Moses Miller stood trial for his crime but was later pardoned.  In 1902, Brown was assigned to the Western District of Indian Territory, serving under Marshal Leo E. Bennett, assigned to Webber Falls, Chickasaw Nation.  He captured Creek Panoski and his gang who were wanted for the murder of three men in the Cookson Hills.  Panoski’s gang consisted of a Creek Indian, named Buster, Jack Candy, and Medley Hair. 

(Indian Pioneer History - William H. Bullard) (Outlaws and Peace Officers) (Hell on the Border - Harman) (Black Red And Deadly) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (National Archives, Washington, D.C. - Account # 11959, 22683 & 30085) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Brown, John L.

D.U.S. Marshal

Vian

1897

Brown, John L.

D.U.S. Marshal

 

1907

 

Brown, John P. worked out of the Western District, Ft. Smith federal court.   One of the pioneers of Indian Territory remembered him as a deputy marshal that usually got his man, having credit of killing four men. 

(Indian Pioneer History - D. T. Faulkner) (Indian Pioneer History - Thomas Jefferson Palmer) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Brown, John W. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Brown, Joseph P. was commissioned on June 1, 1893, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George Crump. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Brown, K. G.  was commissioned in Oklahoma Territory, from July through December of 1896, serving under Marshal Evett Nix.

 (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Brown, M. H. was commissioned in the Northern District of Indian Territory assigned to the Muskogee court in October of 1894. In August of 1895 he served as a posse man in the Northern District at Muskogee.

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (National Archives, Washington, D.C. - Account # 8714 & 11959)

 

Brown, Neal was commissioned in Oklahoma Territory under Marshal Evett Dumas Nix.  Brown and Bill Tilghman came to Indian Territory from Dodge City about the same time.  He was a half-blood Cherokee and a member of the “Dodge City Peace Commission.”   In January of 1895, Neal was with Bill Tilghman and Charley Bearclaw, a former army scout on a mission to arrest persons harboring the Doolin gang.  Their journey took them into the Ingalls area where on their second day of travel it turned bitter cold, starting to snow and sleet.  South of Ingalls smoke was spotted coming out of a dugout chimney which appeared to be a good place to get out of the elements.  As Tilghman climbed out of the covered wagon he could not see any horses or activity around the dugout.  Finding the front door unlocked he pushed the door open, forcing his way inside.  He had no idea that he had just entered the dugout of Bill Dunn, where he was about to face ten of the most dangerous outlaws in all Oklahoma and Indian Territory.  In the bunks were Bill Doolin, Little Dick West, Red Buck, Tulsa Jack, Dynamite Dick, Charlie Pierce, Bitter Creek and Little Bill Raidler, with Bill Dunn setting in a chair cradling his Winchester rifle on his legs.  Tilghman moved toward the fireplace of blazing logs where he warmed himself making sure not looking back over his shoulder, only making idle chatter until he excused himself, leaving the dugout into darkness.  The band of outlaws allowed Tilghman to enter and walk out without being killed because they knew a hundred marshals would be after them if they killed him and Bill Doolin’s control over the gang.  A quick departure to Pawnee was made where they reported to Chief Deputy John Hale that contact was made with the whole Doolin Gang.  A posse made up of several deputy marshals departed for the Dunn’s dugout but found the gang had already departed. 

(Outlaws on Horseback) (Bill Doolin O. T.) (45 Caliber Law) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Brown, P. I.  was placed over the Ponca City District in February 1896, when Marshal Patrick S. Nagle replaced Marshall Evett Nix. 

(West Of Hell’s Fringe) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Brown, P. I.

D.U.S. Marshal

Ponca City

1897

 

Brown, R. G. was commissioned in Oklahoma Territory and was in charge of the Newkirk District in February 1896 when Marshal Patrick S. Nagle replaced Marshal Evett Nix. 

(West of Hell’s Fringe)

 

Brown, R. G.

D.U.S. Marshal

Newkirk

1897

 

Brown, Ruff was a turnkey in the Atoka federal jail.  A forty by fifty foot brick, two story building served as a jail for the Choctaw Indian police and deputy marshals.  The ground floor had three apartments.  One apartment was for the jailer and guards, the second was for the white prisoners and the third was for the colored prisoners.  The upper story had four apartments for women.  One for white women, one for colored women and restrooms for each.  The jail was used until 1913. 

(Indian Pioneer History - Joe Southern)

 

Brown, T. A. was commissioned on April 30, 1894, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George Crump.  Brown Lived in Kosonia, Indian Territory. 

(Ft. Smith Oaths of Office)

 

Brown, T. B. was commissioned in the Western District of Arkansas at Ft. Smith, in 1899, under Marshal Solomon F. Stahl. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Brown, T. H. was commissioned on January 11, 1884, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Thomas Boles. (

Ft. Smith Oaths of Office)

 

Brown, Thomas A. was commissioned on July 18, 1872, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Logan Roots.  Thomas lived in Sebastian County, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Brown, William E. was commissioned at El Reno, Oklahoma Territory in 1894, serving under Marshal Evett Nix.  He rode in a posse of deputy marshals that were called to capture the T. J. Moore gang in 1895.  The gang, Bill McKinzie, Tona Weasel, Grant Pettijohn, Alferd Son and Bailey Son terrorized the citizens of western Oklahoma for several months where they threatened many settlers and pulled several robberies.  The outlaw band was also accused of taking part in the killing of County Treasurer, Fred Hoffman of Taloga.  William rode with deputy marshals Louie Eichoff, Madsen, Prather, Morris, and Banks to capture Jim Harbolt and Jake McKinzie who were wanted for the murder of Canadian Texas, Sheriff McKee.  Harbolt was also charged with the murder of Giles Flippin at the Duncan Store along the Chisholm Trail in 1890. 

(The Woodward Jeffersonian - February 23, March 2, 1895) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Brown, William Green served as deputy marshal for three years. 

(Picture - Notable Men Of Indian Territory)

 

Brownrigg, J. H. was commissioned in the Western District of Arkansas in 1899, under Marshal Solomon F. Stahl.  (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Broyles, J. D. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Sheb Williams.  In February of 1891, Broyles was sent to Indian Territory to serve a warrant of arrest to a colored man known as General Hays.  The prisoner was transported to Ft. Smith, Arkansas, and booked into the federal jail. 

(Ft. Smith Elevator - February 6, 1891)

 

Bruce, George Henry was commissioned in the Southern District Indian Territory at the Ardmore Court in 1897, under Marshal John S. Hammer.  In April of 1897, Bruce was summoned east of Marietta where a man had attempted to assault a woman.  The lady’s husband hearing his wife’s screams ran to their house but found the fiend had already escaped.  Deputy Marshal Bruce followed the man’s trail leading to Delaware Bend where he crossed the Red River into Texas. 

(Marietta Monitor -  April 8,  August 20, 27, 1897)

 

Bruce, George Henry

D.U.S. Marshal

Ardmore

1897

 

Bruner, A. W. was commissioned on March 30, 1894, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George J. Crump. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Bruner, E. Hickman “Heck” was first commissioned in the Western District of Arkansas, assigned to the Cherokee, Nation, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes.   In March of 1892, he brought in James Craig, a member of the Wahco Hampton gang who were charged with the cowardly killing of Deputy Marshals Whitehead and Poorboy.  Wife of Bruner’s friend, Brown Hitchcock wanted her husband dead so she enticed John Brown to assassinate him.  Laying in wait, thinking Hitchcock and Bruner were passing by they were fired upon and killed, but to their surprise their victims were the two officers.  On November 2, 1892, Heck was one of the sixteen deputy marshals that was selected to end Cherokee outlaw Ned Christies violence in Tahlequah, Cherokee Nation. Refer to “The Capture Of Ned Christie” for more information.  Heck rode with Frank Jones, Bill Tilghman, and John McCann in the Creek Nation to arrest the Shelly brothers for stealing horses.  The brothers holed up in their ranch house where they tried to shoot their way out after being surrounded by the officers.  The deputies decided their best chance to capture the outlaws was to burn them out.  The lawmen filled a wagon full of hay, lit it, then pushed the wagon against the house.  The fear of being burnt alive forced the brothers to come out, where they surrendered.  Heck rode with a posse to arrest bank robbers, Sam Rogers and Ralph Hedrick, members of the Bob Rogers Gang who were charged with robbing a bank in Mound City, Kansas.  The two thieves decided to shoot their way out of their situation which proved to be a bad decision, for Rogers was wounded and Hedrick killed.  On January 24, 1894, Heck headed a posse that captured Dynamite Jack, who killed his brother Kiowa, and severely wounded Willis Brown.  Willis Brown died at Vinita while being transported to the federal court in Fort Smith, Arkansas.  Heck was at the Ft. Smith jail on July 26, when Cherokee Bill tried to escape and killed Deputy Marshal Larry Keating.  Heck fired a shotgun blast down the jail corridor to keep all the prisoners from leaving their cells.  In 1895, Heck was assigned to the Northern District Court, in Muskogee, living in Vinita. In June of 1895, Heck was summoned to arrest Deputy Marshal Ed Reed, son of Belle Starr who was charged with organizing a band of outlaws to steal a carload of cattle near Waggoner.   During his career as a federal officer he had to shoot his cousin during his arrest while serving a warrant for train robbery.  Heck Bruner came to the end of his trail on June 22, 1899, when he tried to cross the Grand River at the mouth of Spavinaw Creek.  The river was bank full with the ferry boat unattended on the far side.  Heck Bruner was traveling with Vet Thompson and decided to swim the river to bring the ferry back.  Heck was almost across the river when he went down into the waters where he drowned.

(Indian Citizen - March 22, 1890) (The Weekly Elevator -  May 16, 1890; November 18, 1892, March 3, July 7, September 8, December 15, 1893) (Ft. Smith Elevator - March 4, 1892) (South & West, Beaver - June 10, 1895) (The Enid Weekly Sun - July 6, 1899) (The Enid Weekly Sun - July 6, 1899) (Indian Pioneer History - William Chase) (Indian Pioneer History - Nat Dickerson) (Indian Pioneer History - Tom Finley) (Indian Pioneer History - Edward Hines) (Indian Pioneer History - Phil Horton) Indian Pioneer History - James R. Padgett) (Indian Pioneer History - C. B. Rhodes) (Picture - Muskogee Genealogical Society) (Picture - Hell on the Border-Harman) (Experience Of A U.S. Deputy Marshall) (Outlaws on Horseback) (Iron Men) (Oklahombres) (Outlaws And Lawmen) (Law West Of Fort Smith) (Picture in 1880 -1890 - Heck Thomas) (Black Red And Dangerous) (Outlaws And Lawmen) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List) K

 

Bruner, Heck

D.U.S. Marshal

Vinita

1897

 

BORDER OUTLAW CAPTURED

Jim Rogers, Who Last Of The Notorious Gang, At Last In Custody

 

May 3, 1901-- Checotah Enquirer—Jim Rogers, the last of the notorious Rogers Brothers, who have been terrors along the borders for the past ten years, was brought in to Vinita Sunday and is carefully guarded in the Federal prison.

          The prisoner is a muscular fellow, a typical outlaw, though only 22 years of age.  When only fourteen years old he emulated the daring of his brothers, and entered the store of Henry Hayden, at Hayden post office, and lined the proprietor, at the muzzle of a Winchester, with nine Negroes who were in the place at the time.  He made them all deposit their valuables in a pile, which he placed in a bag, and mounting a horse, got away, since then he has been an outlaw, but as far as is known took no part in the train and bank robberies which his brother’s gang are accused of.  Bob Rogers, noted bank and train robber and horse thief, was killed in a running fight with deputy marshals four years ago.

          Sam Rogers, another brother, was shot through the thighs by Deputy Marshal Heck Brunner, and is now his father’s home a helpless cripple.  He was not prosecuted up on his promise to be good. 

          Jim, the young men now under arrest, was captured in Southern Kansas last fall, but escaped in January from jail and Independence, Montgomery County, after killing the jailer.  Since then he has stolen 21 horses from farmers in the vicinity of Ruby, forged and passed a number of checks, in these charges together with fourteen counts of selling liquor, each of the latter being a felony, are what he will have to face in court next month.  It is certain that he will be sentenced to a long term in the penitentiary.  

          John C.  Nelson, A.  Buton, Jim Mayec and Ples Childers captured Rogers after he had openly asserted that he would not be taken alive.  The men belong to the Anti Horse Thief Association.     There was a reward of $250.00 offered for Rogers.  The men caught him napping on a sofa at Jack Taman’s ranch near where the Shawnee Indians are holding their annual spent dance.  He was heavily armed, but they broke down the doors and had him covered with their Winchesters before he could reach his pistols.  

 

Bruner, Scott was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  He served a warrant of arrest to an outlaw who robbed a woman of six dollars and killed her two year old child.  Resisting arrest, the outlaw shot Scott just below the heart entering his chest and destroying one of his lungs.  Bruner fired back shooting the murderer between the shoulder blades, killing him instantly.  The book “Shoot from the Lip” shows a Scott Bruner in June of 1893, robbing a train and being arrested by Heck Thomas.  This Scott Bruner faced a warrant of arrest for the Wharton train robbery and peddling whiskey. 

(Indian Pioneer History - George D. Castoe) (Indian Pioneer History - William Floyd Davis) (Indian Pioneer History Addie Shipley) (Law West Of Fort Smith) (Shoot from the Lip) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Brunt, Ed was commissioned in the Northern District, Muskogee District Court by Marshal Leo Bennett and assigned to the Pawhuska area.  Ed lost his commission on July 1, 1901.  Deputy Marshal Brunt served with Franklin Revard, Frank Tinker, Fred Penn, Paul Wheeler, Gilbert John Plummer and Dave Sears.

(The Osage Journal, Pawhuska - July 4, 1901)

 

 

 

Bussey, Hez Deputy U. S. Marshal 1898

 

BATTLE WITH OUTLAWS

A Fight Between Deputy Marshals and the “Miller Gang”

 

February 5, 1898—The Cherokee Advocate—Claremore, I. T., Jan. 27—A special to the Fort Smith News Record says:  Information reached here this morning of a shooting at Inola, ten miles from here, in which two deputy marshals, Gabe Beck and “Hez” Bussey were shot and probably mortally wounded.  It is not known at this time whether or not these two men are dead.

                                                  Beck and Bussey, who ride for the Muskogee court, with headquarters at Claremore, had been planning for some time to capture the gang of outlaws, of which one Bill Miller is reported to be the leader.  Last night there was a big dance at Inola, at which it was known the desperadoes would be present.  “Hez” Bussey and Beck were on the scene, but the fact that the outlaws became apprised of the plan and succeeded in capturing and disarming Bussey, delayed the scheme to close in on the bandits.  The latter would have killed Bussey but the intervention of Miller.  When released last night Miller started out for reinforcements and secured them.  This morning he and Beck at the head of a posse, closed in around the house of Bill Critten, at Inola, where the outlaws were quartered.  Firing was opened by the deputies and returned by the outlaws with telling effect.  Beck and Bussey both tumbled to the ground, on which they were half reclining before the battle opened.  Both men were badly wounded, and it is possible that one or both are dead at this writing.  In the meantime the outlaws are at large, although Marshal Bennett at Muskogee has been apprised and reinforcements are already on the way.

                                                   The shooting occurred first as the Valley train, bound for Fort Smith, in charge of Conductor P. J. McNamara, was at the depot—the deputies, in fact, having come down from Claremore on his train.  As the firing was going on McNamara’s tawny whiskers quivered with the excitement of the occasion.  I reminded him of the days of Cook and Cherokee Bill gangs, when, with a six-shooter in each boot and two bowie-knives under his coattails, he used to pull his train through the Indian Territory, dodging bullets at every station.  McNamara told the engineer to hurry up, and the train pulled out.  Mac is a great believer in running on schedule time Passengers were badly scared.

                                                   Bud Weldon got on at Fort Gibson and it is rumored, promptly tendered a box of his Elevator cigars with which to exterminate the bandits.

     It is suggested that if the outlaws can be trapped into smoking them, their death will speedily follow.  Beck was an appointee of Marshal Rutherford and a brave man.  At one time he rode for ex Marshal McAlester.  Bussey is also a fearless deputy and was with George Lawson when “Dynamite Dick” was killed.

                                                   “One story is that Miller, whose parents are said to live in Fort Smith, is not really the head of this gang of outlaws, but is acting as a “decoy” to assist the authorities to capture the band.

 

Bryan, Addis was commissioned in the Western District of Arkansas in 1897, under Marshal Solomon F. Stahl.  

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Bryant, J. H. was a prominent Choctaw who was commissioned as deputy marshal.  Bryant lived in Blue County, dying in 1898.

(Indian Pioneer History - Julius Phillips) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Bryant, W. L.  was commissioned in the Western District of Arkansas in 1899, under Marshal Solomon F. Stahl. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Buchanan, Dave was commissioned in the Southern District of Indian Territory in the Paris, Texas Court.  Dave was serving as deputy marshal and Indian Police when he was killed May 5, 1894, by Poley Empson.  Several men took part in the killing and six were arrested and taken to jail in Paris, Texas.  Empson was arrested by officers William Tucker and A. J. Caldwell.

 (Daily Oklahoman - May 27, 1894)   Killed in the line of duty.

 

Buchanan, William was commissioned in the Western District of Arkansas, under Marshal James S. Fagan.  He was one of five deputy marshals that rode to the western border of the Chickasaw Nation, and into the Western Reserves where they arrested twenty-two persons.  The group passed through Caddo, Choctaw Nation in October of 1875, on their way to the federal court in Ft. Smith, Arkansas where the prisoners were tried.  There were twelve whites, eight Negroes and two Indian prisoners with charges consisting of assault to kill, introducing spirits, buying government property from soldiers, and larceny.

 (Atoka Vindicator - October 21, 1875)

 

Buchner, William

D.U.S. Marshal

Holdenville

1897

 

Buel, R. T.  was commissioned in the Western District of Arkansas in 1899, under Marshal Solomon F. Stahl. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Bullard, William H. served as deputy marshal under Marshal Leo Bennett.  He was one of the officers that went in search of Moses Miller and Bill Nail who were charged with killing a merchant named Jack Taylor from Hobart and in another incident killed Tom Maden from Braggs. 

(Indian Pioneer History - William H. Bullard)

 

Bumpass, R. T. was commissioned on July 3, 1893, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George Crump. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Bumpass, R. T.

D.U.S. Marshal

July 1, 1896

 

Burch, A. W. was commissioned in the Southern District Court of Indian Territory at Paris Texas, in 1894, serving under Marshal Sheb Williams. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals. I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Burch, Albert M. was commissioned in the Southern District Court of Indian Territory at Paris, Texas, in 1895, serving under Marshal Sheb Williams.  He rode with Dave Booker near Marietta, Chickasaw Nation making a three day search for the murders of W. W.  Hambree.   Hambree was found shot and murdered in October of 1896.  The deputy marshals failed to make an arrest but felt the persons committing the crime were still close-by.  Burch and Deputy Marshal Everheart were selected to solve the crime.  The officers found Hambree, Rose and Spindle were a highway gang that had robbed R. H. Walker and William Davidson of Ran, Chickasaw Nation.  After being robbed, Walker and Davidson enlisted a vigilante group to apprehend the robbers.  When the thieves were confronted, Hambree pulled his gun but was shot before he could fire his weapon.  Rose was arrested and placed in jail at Ardmore, Chickasaw Nation.  Spindle was not arrested but was charged with highway robbery. 

(Marietta Monitor - December 24, 31, 1896, January 7, 1897) (The Woodward News - November 13, 1896) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Burche, S. M.  was commissioned in Oklahoma Territory by Marshal Grosvenor Porter, in 1898, serving at Guthrie, Oklahoma Territory.  She was one of three women who would serve the role as deputy marshal.

(File #10 in the Indian Library at the Oklahoma City Archives)

 

Burchfield, Burrell C. was commissioned on August 26, 1890, in Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes.  He was summoned to the Creek Nation in March of 1892, where he served warrants of arrest to Thomas Williams for assault and Anderson Fields for assault.  In May of 1893, Burrell was sent to Checotah where he arrested Albert Brown on burglary charges and transporting him to the Ft. Smith, Arkansas jail.  Burrell was commissioned by Marshal James J. McAlester in the Muskogee District from 1894 thru 1896. 

(Ft. Smith Elevator - March 4, 1892) (The Weekly Elevator - August 12, November 18, 1892, May 5, 26, 1893) (U.S. Deputy Marshal, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (National Archives, Washington, D.C. - Account # 8714, 10049, 10492, 11142, 22379 & 25973) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Burchfield, Burrell C.

D.U.S. Marshal

Durant

1897

 

Burdick, F. M.  was commissioned from September through December of 1894, in Oklahoma Territory, serving under Marshal Evett Nix. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

                             

Burgess, W. N. “Bill” was commissioned in the Southern District of Indian Territory out of the Ardmore Court at Mansfield. Chickasaw Nation, under Marshal John S. Hammer in 1898, Ben Colbert in 1902 and J. A. Porter in 1906, serving until 1911, when he retired at Marietta, Oklahoma.

(Indian Pioneer History - W. N. Burgess) (Ft. Smith Federal Employee Database)

 

Burgevin, Edmund was commissioned on August 9, 1872, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Logan Roots.  Edmund lived in Skulleyville, Indian Territory. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Burke, J. Steve was appointed deputy marshal at Guthrie, Oklahoma Territory by Marshal Evett Nix in 1893.  On September 1, 1893 Steve was one of the thirteen deputy marshals that rode into Ingalls, Oklahoma Territory to confront the Bill Doolin Gang.  Note:  Refer to the “Battle Of Ingalls” for more information.  In May of 1894, Steve worked with Deputy Marshal William Nix to capture cattle thieves Ben Cravens and William Crittendon in the Osage Nation.  In August of 1895, he worked with Deputy Marshal Bill Tilghman to capture women outlaws associated with the Bill Doolin gang, Little Breeches and Cattle Annie.  In 1895, Marshal Evett Nix assigned Burke to Perry, Oklahoma Territory.  In that same year he became Managing Deputy which required him to keep order in the United States federal court.  Any time that a disturbance was made in the court, a stern glance or the raising of his hand usually quenched the disorder but on one occasion two of the most prominent lawyers in the state thought they were above the law when they ignored his warning for not keeping quiet.  When he ejected them from the court room they found out they were not nearly as important as they had thought.  Perry was regarded as one of the wildest towns in Oklahoma Territory.  Later in life Steve Burke was called to become an evangelist. 

(Western Badmen) (Guardian of the Law) (Bill Tilghman) (West of Hell’s Fringe) (Oklahombres) (Outlaws on Horseback) (The Marshals Monitor - Microsoft Internet Explorer) (Picture- Oklahoma Outlaws) (U.S. Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Picture - Muskogee Genealogical Society) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Burke, Thomas was commissioned in Oklahoma Territory under Marshal Jack Abernathy.  He went to Tuttle to arrest J. S. Rhodes and J. H. Maffey who were charged with introducing whiskey into Indian Territory.  More than four gallons of liquor bottled in pint and half-pint bottles packed in sawdust were found in their possession.  Tom Burke had in his possession enlistment papers which supported his claim that he was the youngest veteran to serve in the Civil War.  Burke was only eleven years old when he served in the war. 

(The Seiling Guide - February 7, November 7, 1907)

 

Burke, Thomas

D.U.S. Marshal

 

1907

Burke, Thomas

D.U.S. Marshal

Chickasha

April 16, 1908

 

Burkitt, James was commissioned in the Western District of Arkansas on July 13, 1892, under Marshal Jacob Yoes.  He was one of the sixteen deputy marshals that was selected to end the career of notorious Cherokee outlaw, Ned Christie near Tahlequah, Cherokee Nation, in November of 1892.  Note:  Refer to the “Capture of Ned Christie” for more information.  The 6’ 3” deputy marshal served as sheriff of Washington County before being commissioned.  (The Weekly Elevator - August 12, 1892) (Indian Pioneer History - C. B. Rhodes) (Iron Men) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Burlingame, J. G. was commissioned in September of 1894, serving under Marshal Evett Nix in Oklahoma Territory.  (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Burney, Edward Sehon was commissioned in the Southern District of Indian Territory at the Ardmore Court under Marshal John S. Hammer from 1895 to 1898.  Burney resigned his commission to help his friend Douglas H. Johnson campaign for governorship of the Chickasaw Nation.  Douglas was successful in becoming Governor, appointing Burney as representative of the Dawes Commission.  Burney was reappointed as deputy marshal in 1906, by Marshal Grosvenor A Porter, serving until statehood.  David C. Burney, Chickasaw judge of Picken’s County was the father of Edward and Governor Benjamin Burney.  Edward Burney is buried in a family cemetery one half mile east of the Burneyville cemetery. 

(Ada News - June 19, 1920)  (Chickasaw Star - February 13, 1983) (Picture - Notable Men of Indian Territory)

 

Burney, Edward Sehon 

D.U.S. Marshal

Chickasha

February 20, 1897

Burney, Edward Sehon 

D.U.S. Marshal

 

December 10, 1906 to June 30, 1907

Burney, Edward Sehon 

D.U.S. Marshal

Chickasha

January 29, 1898

 

Edward S. Burney

 

June 20, 1920—Chickasha, OKEdward S. Burney, 59 years old, native of the Chickasaw nation, and called the “Father of Chickasha,” died at his home here this week.  His body was buried in the cemetery he in the early days had helped to dedicate.

          When the Chicago, rock Island & Pacific Railroad Company extended its line through this section of the state and into Texas, in 1892, Burney organized a company and bought the present site of Chickasha, and surveyed—and laid out the town.  Soon after the organization of the village government he was elected a member of the board of education.

          Burney’s father, David C. Burney was of Choctaw and Chickasaw lineage.  He was born in Mississippi and accompanied the Chickasaws in their exodus to Indian Territory.  Here he served a leading place among the councils, the legislatures and in the courts.

          Burney attended all the school of the Chickasha nation and completed a course in the Chickasha manual training school at Tishomingo. When 16 years old, he became a cowboy, after which he engaged in the cattle industry.

Burney served from 1895 to 1898 as deputy U. S. marshal.  He resigned this position to engage in the campaign of Douglas H. Johnson as a candidate for the office of governor of the Chickasaw nation.  After Johnson’s election Burney was appointed as a representative of the Chickasaws on the Dawes commission.  He held this place until 1902.  In 1906 he was reappointed as deputy U. S. marshal, which position he held until Oklahoma became a state.

 

Burney, Joe was remembered as a deputy marshal by J. H. Bullard in Indian Pioneer History. 

(Indian Pioneer History - J. H. Bullard)

 

Burns, Charles Ambrose was commissioned in the Southern District court at Paris, Texas, in 1894.  Charles rode with fellow Deputy Marshal Selden Lindsey to arrest four men on July 19, 1896.  Deputy Marshal Burns was placed in a predicament when he was summoned to serve a warrant of arrest to one of the Pickens boys, a son of I. Hunter Pickens.  I. Hunter Pickens was the most influential man in Pickens County, Chickasaw Nation.  To make things even worse the boy was a brother-in-law to Charles Burns.  The boy had gotten into a shooting scrape and the officers knew he would be hard to arrest.  Deputy Marshal Burns with the assistance of a fellow officer traveled into Pickens Country where they were fired on as they approached the Pickens residence.  Forced to take cover the two officers laid low as the bullets pelted around them.  One of the bullets found its mark as it struck Burn’s fellow officer.  The wounded officer holding his gun to Burns told him he had his choice he would either shoot the boy or he would be shot.  Burns did not have any choice for his brother-in-law would not surrender or stop firing so the Pickens boy was killed.  He rode with fellow Deputy Marshal Claude Cox passing through Muskogee on their way to Ft. Smith in June of 1880.  Burns was summoned to the Alva area in August of 1895, to try to capture the Yeager and Ike Black gang.  Charles Burns resigned his position in February of 1901. 

(The Alva Chronicle - April 12, 1895) (The Alva Pioneer - August 9, 1895) (Indian Pioneer History -S.C. Harris) (Indian Pioneer History - Lee Morgan) (Indian Pioneer History - Virgil Sherrill) (Muskogee - The Indian Journal - June 3, 1880) (The Woodward Bulletin - February 15, 1901) (Selden Lindsey) (Marshal County Memoirs) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) he would be killed.  Deputy Marshal Burns was forced to kill his own brother-in-law. 

 

Burns, Charles was commissioned in the Western District of Arkansas at Ft. Smith under Marshals Logan S. Roots, John Sarber, James Fagan, D. P. Upham and Valentine Dell.  He served as jailer in the Ft. Smith federal jail where he held that position from 1871 to February of 1882.  Orpheus McGee was incarcerated in the Ft. Smith jail and while attempting to escape his plan was foiled when he was shot by jailer Burns leaving McGee crippled until he was later executed.  One day Jailer Burns was setting on the bank of the Poteau River outside the jail when he saw a man come from the river soaking wet.  The man was murderer, John Childers, who had been released on bond.  Childers asked Burns to lock him up because the next day was his trial and his bond would be up.  He knew that if he was late it would hurt his chances in being freed.  Burns told Childers he needed to get the marshal’s permission before he could put him in jail.  Marshal Sarber gave the order and Childers was locked up.  John Childers was never freed and went to the gallows on August 15, 1873. 

(Hell on the Border-Harman) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Burns, Edward was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)   Killed in the line of duty.

 

Burns, John S.  was commissioned at Alva, Oklahoma Territory in 1894, serving under Marshal Evett Nix. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Burns, Joseph was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, where he served as day guard.  (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Burns, J. Henry was commissioned in the Western District of Arkansas in 1899, under Marshal Solomon F. Stahl.  (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Burns, Samuel J. was commissioned in the Northern District of Indian Territory serving under Marshal W. H. Darroughs.  He was born on March 15, 1851 and died on March 5, 1928 and lived at Vinita. 

(Indian Pioneer History - James R. Carseloway) (File #10, Indian Library, Oklahoma Historical Library)

 

Burns, S. J.

D.U.S. Marshal

Vinita

1897

Burns, S. J.

D.U.S. Marshal

 

 July 2, 1906, to June 30, 1907  

 

Burson, Lou was commissioned in the Southern District Court of Indian Territory at Paris, Texas, in 1894, under Marshal Sheb Williams. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Burton, John Millard was commissioned in the Southern Indian Territory Court at Ardmore.  He was assigned to Mill Creek, Chickasaw Nation replacing Deputy Marshal John Poe, who was killed by whiskey dealers on an excursion train returning from Dennison, Texas to Mill Creek.  Another deputy marshal was seriously wounded while another was relieved of his duties for being to lenient.  The whiskey dealers in Mill Creek declared war on the marshal’s force because they were not allowed to operate freely.  Mill Creek was a wide open cattle town where the Chickasaw cattle raisers brought their stock to sell and transport to markets outside of Indian Territory.   Marshal Benjamin H. Colbert of the Southern District wanted the flow of liquor to stop so he enlisted Deputy Marshal Burton who was successful in stopping the flow of liquor in Mill Creek.

 (Gunman’s Territory)

 

Burton, M. F.

D.U.S. Marshal

1907

 

Bushby, Shepherd “Shep” was commissioned in the Western District of Arkansas, being assigned to the Cherokee Nation.  Gordon Sanford and Lewis Maddox robbed a store in Uniontown then fled to the Cherokee Nation where Deputy Marshal Bushby served a warrant for their arrest.  Bushby also arrested

Dick Anderson who killed Frank Canter on July 1, 1885 near the Illinois River in the Cherokee Nation.  Shep was commissioned on August 28, 1889, by Marshal George Crump.  On August 19, 1891, Deputy Marshal Barney Connelley went to Shep Bushby’s home in the Cherokee Nation to serve a warrant of arrest for adultery.  Bushby and his son resisted Connelly’s warrant of arrest, firing on Barney Connelly killing him.   Bushby was executed for his crime on April 27, 1892.  Bushby’s son was charged with manslaughter, serving ten years in the penitentiary at Detroit, Michigan. 

(Ft. Smith Elevator - January 16, 1890) (Indian Citizen -January 18, February 8, 1890) (Ft. Smith Elevator - February 6, 1891) (Hell on the Border - Harman) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Bush, James H. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Bushong, James S. was commissioned on August 28, 1895, working out of the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George Crump. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oath Of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Bushyhead, D. W. was commissioned as Office Deputy in the Northern District of Indian Territory of Indian Territory, assigned to the Muskogee court in August of 1894. (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (National Archives, Washington, D.C. - Account # 11959)

 

Bussey, W. H. "Hesson”  rode with fellow  Deputy Marshal George Lawson of the Eufaula District, on December 4, 1896, to arrest Dan Clifton, ”Dynamite Dick.”  The lawmen went to Sid Williams’ farm, sixteen miles from Newkirk where they found the outlaw.  Resisting arrest, Clifton challenged the deputies when he fired at them with his Winchester rifle.  Lawson returned the fire, hitting Clifton in the arm, breaking it and knocking him from his saddle.  Escaping through heavy brush the seriously wounded outlaw decided to take a stand against the officers when he found a cabin.  The lawmen trailed him to the cabin, and as they closed in, Clifton decided his chances of survival were not good inside of the cabin so he again made an attempted escape when he was gunned him down by the two officers and he died within a few minutes.  “Dynamite Dick” was the last of the Doolin Gang.  In March of 1898, Hess was with officer William Arnold at Claremore when he tried to arrest a man named Johnson who refused to be taken in and shot Arnold, killing him.  Before Johnson could escape Hess shot Johnson killing him instantly. 

(Indian Chieftain, Vinita - March 24, 1898) (Indian Pioneer History - Edward Hines) (Indian Pioneer History - Charles Huckleberry Rogers) (Encyclopedia of a Western Gun Fighter) (Guardian of the Law) (The Lawmen)

 

Butler, G. S. was commissioned in the Western District of Arkansas in 1899, under Marshal Solomon F. Stahl. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

Butner. J. F. was commissioned in Oklahoma Territory in 1894 and 1895, serving under Marshal Evett Nix. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Butner, S.T. was commissioned in Oklahoma Territory, assigned to the Crescent City District on July 15, 1893, under Marshal Evett Nix.  In 1895, he was assigned to Enid, Oklahoma Territory. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (West of Hell’s Fringe)

 

March 12, 1896—The Shawnee Quill--Deputy Marshals S. T. and J. F. Butner succeeded in capturing over in Woods County, three prisoners for the Logan county federal jail.  They were Henry Irwin and Fred Burdie, charged with post office robbery and Alexander Webb an accessory.  The crime was committed on January 5th, the Lahoma post office being cleaned out clean.  The two officers have been at work on the case since, and caught Irwin and Webb in Woods County Saturday and Burdie at Hunnewell, Kansas, Sunday. All three have confessed.

 

Byers, C.A. was commissioned in Oklahoma Territory in July through December of 1894, under Marshal Evett Dumas Nix.

 (U.S. Deputy Marshals. I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

Byrd, D. F.

D.U.S. Marshal

April 2, 1905

 

Byrd, Martin was commissioned on May 5, 1890, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes.  In April of 1890, Deputy Marshals Martin Byrd, Tandy Walker and Bob Topping brought in John Boyd, a robber from the Choctaw Nation and the dead body of John Davis.  Davis was a fugitive of ten years who had scaled the walls at the Little Rock, Arkansas penitentiary.  The two outlaws robbed Judge Taylor and several other residents of Sculleyville, Choctaw Nation in March of 1890. 

(Ft. Smith Elevator - April 11, 1890) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

Byrd, William L. jr.

D.U.S. Marshal

July 1, 1906 to February 28, 1907