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ROBERT KING'S OKLAHOMA U. S. MARSHALS AND DEPUTY U. S. MARSHALS

 James J. McAlester to John McWeir

 

McAlester, James Jackson was working with Deputy Marshal John Swain in the Chickasaw Nation where they had in their possession several prisoners.  At a religious meeting on July 15, 1888, in the Chickasaw Nation, Shadrack Peters, Cy Love and two other Negroes got into a dispute over a saddle.  Malachi Allen went to the back of a wagon to get his Winchester and he approached Peters who was leaning on the back of a chair.  Without any warning he shot and killed the unarmed Peters.  The others tried to run to safety but were shot at as they made their flight.  A bullet hit Cy Love in the back which killed him instantly.  Malachi left the murder scene on foot but returned shortly on a horse.  Deputy Marshal McAlester being in the vicinity when the incident occurred organized a posse and went after him.  During a running chase Swain was the first to overtake Allen and ordered him to surrender.  The killer slid from his horse as to surrender but when the opportunity was right, he fired on Swain.  Several shots were exchanged until the Negro broke and ran.  Swain shot him in the arm, causing it to shatter which resulted in a fast surrender.  Judge Parker sentenced Malachi Allen to hang from the gallows on April 19, 1889. 

(Ft. Smith Elevator - January 11, 1889) (Hell on the Border-Harman) (Law West Of Fort Smith)

 

McAlister, J. S. was commissioned in Oklahoma Territory from October through December of 1894, serving under Marshal Evett Nix. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

McAllister, John J. was commissioned on May 23, 1888 in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  In August of 1888, he brought into Ft. Smith twenty-six prisoners from Indian Territory.  Charges for the prisoners ranged from murder, intent to kill, larceny and introducing liquor into Indian Territory.  One of the prisoners was Milakire Allen, a Negro wanted for the killing of Cy Love and Shed Peters in the Chickasaw Nation.  During an attempted arrest Allen was shot in the arm shattering it so badly that it had to be amputated at the elbow.  Allen had previously served time at the Detroit prison for a charge of intent to kill.  John McAllister was killed in 1888 or 1889. 

(Ft. Smith Elevator - August 10, 1888) (Oklahombres) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)   Killed in the line of duty.

 

McArthur, D. E. was commissioned on June 11, 1889, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.

(Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

McCabe, M. P. was commissioned on December 6, 1894 in the Western District at Ft. Smith Arkansas, serving under Marshal George J. Crump. Deputy Marshal McCabe was living in Ft. Smith, Arkansas when commissioned. 

(Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

McCalister, J. C. was commissioned in the Western District in 1899. 

(Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

McCall, William W.  was commissioned on July 8, 1895, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George J. Crump.  In February of 1892, Deputy Marshals McCall, LeFlore and Ran Dickerson confronted the Gordon gang near Brunertown, Seminole Nation, when they killed Wash Bruner. 

(Ft. Smith Elevator - June 10, 1892) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office)

 

McCamish, A. Lee was commissioned in the Northern District of Indian Territory, serving under Marshal Darrough.  While living at Grove, he telephoned Marshal Darroughs, telling about a Seneca Indian woman on the reservation who killed her husband by braining him with an ax.  Marshal Darroughs told Deputy Marshal McCamish to turn the woman over to the Indian agent at Wyandotte if she showed signs of insanity, if not, then transport her to the Vinita jail.

(The Sterrett Sun - August 10, 1906) (File #10, Indian Library, Oklahoma Historical Library)

 

McCamish    

A.

L.

D.U.S. Marshal

March 21, 1905

 

McCann, John worked with Deputy Marshals Ledbetter and Jess Jones in 1895, to arrest the Pemberton -Turner Gang.  In the winter of 1895, John served with Deputy Marshals Frank Canton and Dean Hogan, to arrest the Shelley brothers. 

(Experiences of A Deputy U.S. Marshal) (Frontier Trails) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

McCarth, Bill worked with Buck Garrett in the Southern District Indian Territory, Ardmore Court. 

(Gunman’s Territory)

 

McCartney, John J. was assigned to the Alva District, Oklahoma Territory in February of 1896, when Marshal Patrick Nagle replaced Marshal Evett Nix. Deputy Marshal McCartney was Marshal Nagle’s brother-in-law. 

(West of Hell’s Fringe) (Shoot from the Lip) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

McCartney    

John

J.

D.U.S. Marshal

Alva

March 11, 1905

 

McCauly, Billy was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. He attended the 1908 U.S. marshals’ reunion at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.

(Picture - The Western Peace Officer) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

McCauley, Bud and Bill Fields went to Ft. Smith, Arkansas in May of 1884, to take a part in the federal court. 

(Indian Champion - May 17, 1884)

 

McCay, Alf See:  McKay

 

McClain    

R.

A. 

D.U.S. Marshal

Wagoner

March 11, 1905

 

McClanahan, John rode with Deputy Marshals Bud Ledbetter, Payton Tolbert, Lon Lewis, Jake Elliott, Gus and Joe Thompson when they capture the Al Jennings Gang on November 29, 1895. The deputy marshals served in the Northern District under Marshal Samuel Rutherford.  (Oklahombres) (Iron Men)

 

McClellan, Charles M. was commissioned on April 22, 1892 and July 12, 1893, while living in Talala, Indian Nation. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

McCloud, was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

McClure, B. "Tony was commissioned on April 22, 1895, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  Deputy Marshal McClure was living at Cameron, Choctaw Nation when commissioned. 

(Indian Pioneer History - Samantha Johnson) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

McClure, F. T. served in the Central District in 1895 and 1896. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

McClure    

F.

T.

D.U.S. Marshal

South McAlester

February, 20, 1897

 

McClure  

Jack

D.U.S. Marshal

January 30, 1899

 

McClure, John H. was commissioned on July 23, 1872, May 30, 1889, April 14, 1890, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Logan S. Roots.  Deputy Marshal McClure was living in Sebastian County, Arkansas, when commissioned. 

(Hell on the Border - Harman) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

McCollum, J. M. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

McConnell, William H. was commissioned on July 3, 1894 in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal George J. Crump.  William was a guard at the Western District court federal jail at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, when Henry Starr and Cherokee Bill tried to escape from murder’s row.  Deputy Marshal McConnell was living in Clarksville, Arkansas when commissioned.

(Hell on the Border-Harman) (Black Red And Deadly) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

McCormick    

J.

P.

D.U.S. Marshal

Temporary

 

McCormick, W. C. was appointed deputy marshal in January of 1891, being over the west end of Beaver County in Oklahoma Territory. 

(The Territorial Advocate - March 4, 1891.)

 

McCoughan, John served in the Northern Judicial District in 1895.

 (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

McCaughan 

John

D.U.S. Marshal

Checotah

March 11, 1905

 

McCoy, Alf served in the Central District in 1894. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

McCracken, Robert T. was commissioned on November 3, 1891, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

McCuistion, Walter was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

McCullough, W. T. was commissioned on May 28, 1886, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal John Carroll. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

McCurtain, Edmund was commissioned on November 27, 1886 and August 4, 1890, in the Western District of Arkansas, serving under Marshals Jacob Yoes.  Edmund had previously fought in the Civil War in Indian Territory under General Cooper of the Confederate Army.  After the Civil War, white intruders and outlaws came to Indian Territory where they were immune to the jurisdiction of the Indian police.  Deputy Marshal McCurtain was commissioned to try to control the Choctaw and Chickasaw territories when they became infested with the criminals.  Deputy Marshal McCurtain lived in San Bois, Indian Territory when commissioned. 

(Leaders And Leading Men Of Indian Territory - Choctaws And Chickasaws) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

McCurtain, Green was commissioned on May 11, 1896, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

McDaniel, John W. was commissioned on November 12, 1885 and June 19, 1893, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshals John Carroll and George J. Crump.  In September of 1893, William Plynn was arrested on charges of introducing and selling liquor at Alderson, Indian Territory.  Plynn was transported to the federal jail at Ft. Smith.  Deputy Marshal McDaniel was living in Ft. Smith, Arkansas when he was commissioned. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

(Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

McDaniel, John W. served in the Central District in 1894 and 1895.

 (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

McDaniel, W. C. was commissioned in the Western District of Arkansas.  Deputy Marshal McDaniel was shot and killed by Bob Rogers.  Bob Rogers, living in the Cherokee Nation started his young life as a robber where he went to reform school at a young age.  It was not long after Bob Rogers got out of reform school that he went back to his old ways by forming a gang.  In January of 1895, the heat got so bad that Rogers gave his whole gang away to the deputy marshals for his own freedom. Then in December of 1895, Rogers went back to his criminal ways by robbing a train at Seminole Switch.  On March 16, 1895, Deputy Marshal Jim Mayes led eleven deputy marshals to Bob Rogers’s father’s home, where they surrounded it before approaching it just before daylight.  Four people in the house allowed the deputies to enter.  Three deputy marshals went to the upstairs of the house to arrest Bob Rogers.  W. C. McDaniel, being the lead marshal, went to the top of the stairs where he met Bob Rogers waiting with his pistols in his hands.  McDaniel ordered Rogers to raise his hands but giving up was not in Bob Roger’s plan.  A slug tore through McDaniel’s body, just beneath his heart, coming out his body where it passed over the heads of two oncoming deputy marshals.  McDaniel’s body fell backwards, lifeless into the other two approaching deputy marshals.  Deputy Marshal Phil Williams, the next deputy in line of fire from Rogers, was fired at striking him in the wrist.  This action caused the two deputy marshals to fall to the bottom of the stairs.  The deputy marshals in the lower story of the house became excited when they heard the shooting and, seeing their fellow officers killed, then drove down the stair case.  The officers retaliated with a volley of about fifty shots.  Bob Roger’s father was shot by a stray bullet in the big toe.  Rogers put down his pistols picked up McDaniel’s Winchester, and fired two or three shots before taking cover to wait for an opportunity to escape.  The lawmen sent a friend of Rogers up to ask him to surrender but he refused.  Finally Roger agreed to come down if he would be allowed to keep his rifle.  Rogers came downstairs, then walked to the front yard of the house, standing before the deputy marshals with McDaniel's Winchester rifle in hand.  Bob Rogers made an attempted escape, firing at the officers as he ran.   The officers fired back at him, striking him twenty-two times with 38 caliber slugs and twice with the blast of a shotgun. 

(Hell on the Border - Harman) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

McDonald, A. A. served in the Northern Judicial District in 1895 and 1896.

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

McDonald    

A.

A.

D.U.S. Marshal

Muskogee

February 20, 1897

 

McDonald, Alva L.  U. S. Marshal

 

Former U. S. Marshal, State Politician, Dies

Alva McDonald Won Fame as the ‘Hard Tracker’

 

January 4, 1942—El Reno, OK—The end of the trail came here Sunday for Ala L. McDonald, who weathered four stormy years as United States marshal for the western district of Oklahoma to win the label “hard tracker” bestowed grudgingly in the state’s criminal circles.

          The Spanish-American and Philippines insurrection veteran, whose career as a marshal from 1921 to 19325, might well have been labeled a chapter I the “Passing of Oklahoma Outlaws,” fell dead as he entered the lobby of a downtown theater building to attend Sunday school at l:30 am.

 Death was due to a heart ailment.

State Resident Since 1901

          He was born September 16, 1876, at Cordsville, Ky., and was graduated from Hartford College, Kentucky in 1894.  He served with the Seventh California volunteers and later with the 31st infantry in the Philippines.  In the last 10 months in the Philippines he was military postmaster at Zambonanga.

          He came to Oklahoma in 1901, settling at El Reno and in 1905 was elected a member of the city council, serving s president of that body for two terms.  In 1907 Theodore Roosevelt appointed him clerk of the third district federal court in Alaska and he was stationed at Fairbanks

After three years in Alaska he returned to El Reno and in 1912 was chose a delegate to the Republican national convention.  He had been a delegate to several conventions since, including the 1940 enclave.

Bolted Republican Ranks

An old-time Republican of the state he was a personal friend of Theodore Roosevelt and led the Bull Moose movement in this state as chairman of the party in 1912.  In 1928 he bolted Republican ranks to favor Al Smith.

McDonald was appointed marshal by President Harding.  He was the old type of officer and went with his men on cases

Under his leadership a band of deputy marshals handled some of the most difficult cases in the state’s history.

Weeks of painful work through the brush hills of the Osage country were more attractive to him than the pleasant office of the marshal.

Beginning with the breaking up of the notorious Al Spencer gang, he perhaps accomplished as much as any other man in the organized war on the bandit who terrorized the state in his day.

Mail Robbery Solved

          He and his deputies played an important part in the running down of such men as Jeff Duree, the ghost bandit, Blackie Thompson, the Thayers, Frank Nash and a dozen others.

          It was I the autumn of 1923 that eh Okesa mail robbery was solved.  Spencer slain and members of his gang arrested following week of McDonald’s usual “hard tracker” tactics.

          An outstanding feature of his officership was his investigation of the “Shawnee reign of terror,” which accompanied the shops strike in the spring of 1923.  Twenty-three men, including high officials of the shops craft, were implicated by McDonald in these disorders.

          On one occasion he mounted the platform alone and told a strikers’ meting of several thousand shop men what he thought of the incidents in Shawnee.

          He withstood a constant political barrage while holding the post.  Rumors of his resignation or his removal from office occurred with regularity from time to time.  From each investigation he emerged unscathed.

          Survivors include his wife; a son, Alva Ferguson McDonald, Fairview; a daughter Mrs. Gordon Bierer, Guthrie, and two brothers and four sisters.

          Arrangements are pending the arrival of relatives.

 

 

McDonald, Dick was commissioned in the Western District of Arkansas in 1899. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

McDonald, L. N. was chief deputy of the Northern District under Marshal Rutherford in 1895.  In 1895, The Rufus Buck Gang was in jail at Muskogee waiting to visit Judge Parker in Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  The Indian-Negro mixed gang terrorized the Caddo, Choctaw Nation area, robbing anyone that seemed to be easy prey.  The crimes of the gang elevated until they raped a white woman which was the last straw for the community.  Getting volunteers for the posse to capture the gang was no problem.  The gang bragged they would not be taken alive but when their reckoning day came all five gang members were arrested.   A group of people gathered in Muskogee to march on the jail to remove the gang so they could be lynched.  McDonald was able to persuade the mob to allow the law to take care of the outlaws. 

(Gunman’s Territory) (Indian Pioneer History - Phil Horton) (Black Red and Deadly) (Outlaws and Peace Officers of I. T.) (Outlaws and Lawmen)

 

McDonald, W. J. arrived with several citizens from the neutral strip.  The group was involved in stealing cattle and running a distillery in the Panhandle.  The Panhandle was remote from any type of law, marshal or Indian, which made it an attractive area for the outlaws to live in.  

(The Territorial Topic - October 24, 1889)

 

McDonaugh, George was assigned to Edmond, Oklahoma Territory during the 1889 land rush under Marshal Thomas Needles. 

(Oklahoma Land Rush of 1889)

                                                                                                                  

McDougal, Robert Daniel, was commissioned by Marshal J. J. McAlester in the Southern District of Indian Territory in 1893, then transferred to work the federal jail in Ardmore under Marshal Ben Colbert for a four year term.  McDougal retired from law enforcement in 1901.  Robert was born on August 8, 1857 and died at one hundred-one years of age in 1958 in Madill, Oklahoma. 

(Madill Record -) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

McEwan, John was commissioned on May 28, 1894, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas and later was assigned to the Central District.  Deputy Marshal McEwan lived in Krebbs, Indian Territory when commissioned. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

McFall, was working with Deputy Marshal Lilley when they arrested J. H. Essay and J. H. Frazier who had been defacing currency.  $2 bills were being altered to appear as $20 bills.  The two men were taken to the Ardmore jail.

 (Fairview Republican - March 24, 1905)

 

McGeeney, Patrick S. was commissioned on May 24, 1893, by Marshal William C. Grimes at Guthrie, Oklahoma Territory.  On July 31, 1893, he was commissioned again by Marshal Evett Nix when Marshal Grimes was replaced.  Deputy Marshal McGeeney rode with the three Guardsmen, Heck Thomas, Bill Tilghman and Chris Madsen.  McGeeney witnessed the killing of one of the most notorious outlaws that ever lived, John Wesley Hardin.  Patrick was born on August 19, 1873 in Ireland. This deputy marshal was the youngest man to serve as deputy marshal, serving until 1896, when Marshal Nagle reduced the deputy marshal force.  Deputy Marshal Robert Hutchins was also reported as the youngest person to serve as deputy marshal in the Western District.  However his age was not given. 

(Purple Sage) (Gunman’s Territory)

 

McGill, John B. was commissioned on June 22, 1891 and July 9, 1894, serving in the District Court at Muskogee, Creek Nation.  He rode with a posse that tried to capture Cherokee Bill in November of 1894.  Cherokee Bill and the Cook brothers were trailed to Caney River near Talala, where they became engaged in a shoot-out.  During the gun battle Deputy Marshal, Sequoyah Houston, was shot and killed.  Bill’s horse was killed as it was shot from under him but he was able to escape.   Crawford Goldsby, alias “Cherokee Bill,” was convicted of Houston’s murder on February 27, 1895, and went to the gallows on March 17, 1896. 

(The Weekly Elevator - December 22, 1892, March 3, 1893) (The Eagle Gazette - November 29, 1894) (Hell on the Border-Harman) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office)

 

McGlaughlin, Sterling P. “Price Court records show that Price was very active in 1890.  In a four month period he made twelve arrests.  Charges included larceny, murder, bigamy, introducing whiskey and selling liquor in Indian Territory.  In March of 1890, Deputy Marshal McGlaughlin served a warrant of arrest to John Hinton, wanted for murder.  He was commissioned on May 28, 1895, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  McGlaughlin was appointed as special deputy on November 17, 1899, while living in Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  Price is picture in the 1908 U.S. marshals’ reunion at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Atoka Indian Citizen - January 18, February 15, March 8, March 22,  April 12, & May 10, 1890) (Ft. Smith Elevator - August 16, 1899; May 1, 1890) (Picture - The Western Peace Officer) (U.S. Deputy Marshals. I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

McGlothlin, Frank was working with Deputy Marshal Wilson in 1907, when they killed Reverend Sylvester Morris, in Tulsa, mistaking him for a bootlegger.  The two deputy marshals applied for bond which was rejected. The federal grand jury indicted the two lawmen for first degree murder.  The actions of the deputy marshals brought about an atmosphere of great excitement creating talk of lynching the two lawmen.

 (The Seiling Guide - October 3, 24, 1907)

 

McGooden, J. K. was assistant chief deputy clerk under Marshal Evett Nix of Oklahoma Territory in 1895.  (Oklahombres) (U.S. Deputy Marshals. I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

McGraft, and Deputy Marshal Joe Runnels were working out of Woods county in June of 1895, when they transported Belle Black and Jennie Freeman to the Guthrie jail on June 7, 1895.  They were sent before Commissioner Bickel who sent them to jail.  Jennie was the wife of outlaw Matt Freeman who became a companion to Nelson Wyatt alias “Dick Yeager” alias “Zip Wyatt”.  Belle Black was the wife of outlaw Ike Black and sole mourner of Tulsa Jack who was killed after the Dover train robbery.  The two women were arrested in the Gloss Mountains west of Fairview where officers had Ike Black, Dick Yeager and another outlaw who was suspected to be Bill Doolin blocked in a cave.  The two women were leaving the locality when caught and had in their possession money and valuables taken during a robbery from a post office near Fairview. 

(The Kingfisher Times - June 13, 1895)

 

McGrew, Mike Deputy U. S. Marshal 1948

 

New Deputy Marshal

 

March 13, 1948—The Oklahoman--Mike McGrew, Britton, Monday wore a shiny new badge as United States deputy marshal.

          U. S. marshal Dave E. Hilles pinned on the shiny new badge.  McGrew, former Oklahoma County deputy sheriff took the oath of office before Federal Judge Stephen Chandler Monday morning.  McGrew has been a peace officer and deputy sheriff since 1929, except for 28 months with the Seabees during World War II

 

McGuire, was commissioned in the Northern District, Muskogee Court, assigned to the Pawhuska court working the Osage Nation.  Part of the deputy force was released on July 1, 1901, but Deputy Marshal McGuire was retained. 

(The Osage Journal, Pawhuska - July 4, 1901)

 

McGuire, Hugh was commissioned on May 13, 1871, and July 18, 1872, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Logan S. Roots.  McGuire lived in Fayetteville, Arkansas when he was commissioned.  On October 22, 1875, Deputy Marshals Robert French and Hugh McGuire arrested Jesse Cochran.  Jesse’s brother was killed by a man named Rooks, in 1873, which caused Jesse to avenge his death by taking Rooks life.  Jesse resisted arrest but was taken after a brief gun battle.  Jesse was charged with assault by resisting arrest but was released in 1877.  It is possible that this was the same Jesse Cochran that was a deputy marshal serving in the Western District of Arkansas.  Hugh was killed in Muskogee, Creek Nation, when he got into a row with another deputy marshal which ended in a shoot-out leaving Hugh McGuire dead. 

(Caddo Starr - February 8, 1876) (Outlaws and Lawmen) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)     Killed in the line of duty.

 

McGuire, Mike Deputy U. S. Marshal  December 14, 1970 OKC

 

McHan, Isaac Greenbury “Mike was assigned to the Western District at Ft.  Smith, Arkansas.  Mike served with fellow Deputy Marshal Paden Tolbert.  Mike was a large man whose size intimidated most of those around him.  He stood 6’ 5”, weighing around 250 pounds.  A group of people outside of the Ft. Smith jail made an effort to lynch Cherokee Bill while he was on murders row but it was stopped by Deputy Marshal McHan.

(Iron Men)

 

McHaney, Lewis was commissioned on August 25, 1892, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office)

 

McHenry, John L. worked in the Choctaw Nation taking prisoners to Caddo before transporting them to jail in Paris, Texas.  Oklahombres reported McHenry was killed December 26, 1895.

 (Oklahombres) (Indian Pioneer History - J. W. White)    Killed in the line of duty,

 

McHenry, McHaney, Lewis

(Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

McIntosh, Chub W. “Wiley” was working in the Western District of Arkansas on October 14, 1875, when he was sent to Ft. Sill to deliver Aaron Wilson to the Ft. Smith court to be tried for the murder of James and John Harris.  The father and his twelve year old son were traveling through the southwestern part of Indian Territory when they were confronted by Wilson.  After sharing a meal and inviting their guest to spend the night with them, they were both killed.  The father was struck several times in the skull with an ax and the son was shot with a shotgun as he tried to run.  After scalping both of his victims and robbing them of their horses and possessions he returned to the Comanche camp where he was living.  He bragged of his deeds and thought the Indians would admire him but the Comanche had contempt for him for they knew his victims had given him hospitality and it was against their belief that any harm should have been done to them.  The Indians reported the killings to the Wichita Agency and Wilson was taken to Ft. Sill.  On June 13, 1876, when Deputy Marshal Cavenaugh and McIntosh traveled through Caddo, Choctaw Nation, on their way to the federal court at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, with ten prisoners arrested near Ft. Sill.  In July of 1888, Wiley arrested Dan Thompson ten miles from Eufaula, having a reward of five-hundred dollars for his capture.  While transporting his prisoner, he escaped and was recaptured at a corn dance.  Thompson was wanted for the killing of Deputy Marshal John Phillips and his posse.  Wiley rode with Deputy Marshal Bazz Reeves to arrest W. H. McDonald and Cords who were charged with the murder of John Irvins at Blue Creek, twelve miles south of Wagoner. On August 6, 1895, Chub was commissioned while living in Okmulgee, Indian Territory.  Wiley served as Indian Policeman until November of 1897, when he was replaced by Bent Cobb.  Wiley continued to work as Turnkey at the U. S. jail at Muskogee. 

(Ft. Smith Elevator - August 3, 1888) (Ft. Smith Records, Jacket 202, 1875) (Caddo Starr - June 13, 1876) (The Woodward News - November 12, 1897) (Black Red and Dangerous) (Law West Of Fort Smith) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

McIntosh, Mose was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  In the late 1880’s a young Creek Indian Wesley Barnett, learned that his mother had been killed by his stepfather and killed him out of revenge.  His life turned to crime when he and several other young Creeks became involved in stealing horses.  The horses they stole were of good quality and belonged to the white ranchers in the area.  This changed when the robbers took several horses from one of the leaders of the Creek Nation which caused a vigilante group to try to apprehend the band of thieves.  The vigilantes led by Mutaloke, the Creek leader whose horses had been taken, located one of the rustlers named Partridge and killed him when he was returning home.  His death was so swift and brutal that Mutaloke hoped to scare Barnett and force him into hiding but the Creek outlaw sought revenge and gunned down Mutaloke.  On June 30, 1888, Deputy Marshal John Phillips and a member of his posse went to a Green Corn dance northeast of Eufaula in search of two prisoners that had escaped them.  Late in the evening the officers left the dance and went to a nearby spring where they felt the prisoners would turn up.  Wesley Barnett and his brother arrived at the springs and when Phillips confronted them, the Barnett brothers fired on them, killing John Phillips and his partner.  Waite Barnett was also killed in the altercation.  Up to this time, all of Wesley Barnett’s crimes fell under the jurisdiction of the Creek Nation but when John Phillips and McLaughlin was killed by him, he became a wanted man under the jurisdiction of the Western District Court at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  On November 9, 1888, Captain Lerblance led thirty-five lighthorsemen to the Wealaka area in pursuit of Barnett and his band.  Their search ended at the home of Abe Carr who was harboring the outlaws.  Moses McIntosh was a member of Lerblance’s posse and was killed in the gunfight that lasted that day and throughout the night.  When dawn arrived the following morning, Wesley Barnett and his gang was gone.  On November 11th four members of the Barnett gang were arrested and taken to Ft. Smith, Arkansas to be tried for Moses McIntosh’s death.  On January 12, 1889, Deputy Marshal David Rusk and Wallace McNae located Wesely Barnett and one of his gang members five miles east of Okmulgee where McNae fired the shot that ended the life of Creek outlaw Wesley Barnett.  (The Indian Chieftain - January 19, July 5, November 15, December 6, 13, 20, 1888) (Muskogee Phoenix - July 5, October 8, November 8, 15, December 6,13,20,1888; January 10,17, 1889) (Oklahombres) (Black, Red & Deadly)  (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

McInturf, W. D. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

McKay, Alferd was commissioned on August 9, 1888 and July 18, 1889, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

McKay, D. S. was a deputy marshal assigned at Guthrie, Oklahoma Territory from October of 1894 through June of 1895, serving under Marshal Evett Nix. 

(Indian Pioneer History - Tom Dorsett) (West of Hell’s Fringe) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

McKay, M. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes.  In November of 1888, Sandy Ervin went to the establishment of D. D. Dennis at McAlester where the two became involved in a quarrel.  Elvin left the place but soon returned with his Winchester and a shooting fray ensued, leaving Ervin dead.  Dennis surrendered to Deputy Marshal McKay and was taken to the jail in Ft. Smith, Arkansas where he pleaded self defense in court.

(Ft. Smith Elevator - November 23, 1888)

 

McKee, Bill was working with the Crittenden brothers and Sequoyah Houston when they confronted the Cook Gang and “Clarence Goldsby alias “Cherokee Bill” in the Cherokee Nation on June 17, 1894.  Deputy Marshal Sequoyah Houston was killed during the shoot-out.   Outlaw Jim Cook was seriously wounded when he was shot several times but was captured when his brother and “Cherokee Bill” left him, making their escape.  Bill Cook and “Cherokee Bill” escaped capture but were eventually captured by the deputy marshals.  Bill Cook was sentenced to prison while “Cherokee Bill’s” end came at the Ft. Smith gallows on March 17, 1896. 

(Outlaws and Lawmen)

 

McKee, Bruce was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  In May of 1886, Deputy Marshal McKee was working with George Pound when they arrested six prisoners in Indian Territory.  Arrests were for bigamy, assault with intent to kill, larceny and Introducing liquor into Indian Territory.  The prisoners were taken to the federal jail in Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Elevator - May 14, 1886) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

McKee, J. A. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

TRAIN ROBBERS CAPTURED

Zip Wyatt, the Escaped Convict Supposed to Be One of Them

An Important Telegram From a Deputy United States Marshal—Three Train Robbers Captured at Hennessey-The Cimarron City Bandit Supposed to Be One of Them—Newcombe, Alias Butcher Kid, Identified

 

June 16, 1893—Guthrie Daily News--United States Deputy Marshal McKeever last evening forwarded a dispatch from Stillwater to U. S. Deputy Marshal Madsen containing the important information that three men were captured at Hennessey yesterday afternoon, one of whom has been recognized as the famous bandit, George Newcombe alias Butcher Kid, and the other is believed beyond a doubt to be the famous train robber and man killer Zip Wyatt, whose escape from the territorial jail in this city last winter caused such a sensation.

    The third man has not been recognized but from his description is supposed to be the daring Cimarron City train robber.  His appearance exactly coincides with that given of the bandit who stopped the train and robbed it at that place recently.  He is a slim, yet strong looking fellow, and the circumstances attending his arrest makes it almost sure that the marshals have the right man.

    The railroad officials regard these captures as of great moment and of course they feel jubilant.

 

McKinney, Johnson P. was commissioned on September 29 1890 and October 15, 1891, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes.  In January 1891, he was sent to Indian Territory to serve a warrant of arrest to Nelson Benge, charged with introducing.  In February he returned to Braggs, Indian Territory to serve a warrant of arrest to Lyman Lewis charged with assault.  In March of 1892, he was summoned to serve a warrant of arrest to Mark Flute on charges of introducing and selling liquor in the Cherokee Nation.  In June of 1892, he returned to the Cherokee Nation to serve a warrant of arrest to Dave Henry for introducing and selling liquor in Indian Territory. 

(Ft. Smith Elevator - January 23, February 27, 1891; March 18, June 17, 1892) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

McKinney, Wilson was appointed field deputy marshal in April of 1904, at Hughes.  McKinney was appointed by Marshal George K. Pritchard of the Central District.  In March of 1905, Deputy Marshal McKinney of Poteau went to arrest George McGuire, a whiskey peddler.  The bootlegger pulled a gun, shooting Wilson.  The wound was believed to be fatal.  Bloodhounds were used to trail the guilty man. McGuire’s defense was he did not know McKinney was an officer.

 (The Muskogee Democrat - March 18, 1905) (The Choctaw News - June 2, 1904)    Killed in the line of duty.

 

McKinney 

Wilson

D.U.S. Marshal

July 1, 1960 to June 10, 1907

 

McKinnis, Theodore was commissioned in the Northern District of Indian Territory, serving under Marshal W. H. Darrough in July of 1902, assigned to the Nowata area.

 (Ft. Smith Elevator - July 18, 1902)

 

McKoin, C. was appointed in February of 1906, chief deputy marshal by Marshal Grosvenor Porter of the Southern District Indian Territory, Ardmore District Court. 

(The Sterrett Sun - February 23, 1906)

 

McKoin    

C.

G.

D.U.S. Marshal

Ardmore

2/19/1906--1907 I. T. Southern

 

McLeas, C. A. was commissioned in June of 1898.  McLeas was still alive in 1930, living at Muskogee. 

(Indian Pioneer History - W.F. Jones)

 

McLeas      

C.

A.

D.U.S. Marshal

April 5, 1907 to July 7,  1907

 

McLellan, Abner B. was killed on July 20, 1894, ten miles west of Caddo, Choctaw Nation during an attempted arrest of Gerald Bryant on charges of larceny.  Bryant was followed by a posse to the home of a man named Bradburn, six miles from the scene of the murder where the cabin was surrounded and at daylight he was killed as he tried to escape. 

(Ft. Smith Elevator - August 3, 1894) (Oklahombres) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

McLemore, William E. “Bill worked out of the Southern District at Paris, Texas and the Southern District Indian Territory, Ardmore District Court in 1894 thru 1896.  Deputy Marshal McLemore confronted outlaw Dave Putty on the dance platform in Duncan, Chickasaw Nation. A picnic was in process and Putty tried to run the picnic grounds and the dance platform.  Complaints were made to McLemore and he advised the troublemaker to leave it alone or he would arrest him.  An angered Putty resisted tried to take the officers pistol away from but was killed in a scuffle that followed.  Putty was also wanted for the murder of Deputy Marshal Ed Thurlow whom he killed on February 10, 1895.  In March of 1901, McLemore worked with Deputy Marshal Booker, to transport quail from Indian Territory to Wichita, Kansas.  Seven hundred and fifty quail were sent in ten boxes.  In June of 1905, Deputy Marshal McLemore was in Marietta searching for lawbreakers.

 (The Antlers Democrat - March 29, 1901) (Ft. Smith Elevator - July 18, 1902) (Marietta Monitors - June 30, 1905) (Indian Pioneer History - Clarence B. Douglas) (Indian Pioneer History - D. N. Doak) (Indian Pioneer History - Tom Dorsett) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

McLamore 

W.

E.

D.U.S. Marshal

Tishomingo

March 11, 1905

 

Former Marshal Dies

 

April 7, 1912—Ardmore, OK—E. McLamore, a pioneer resident of Ardmore, died at his home here this afternoon of apoplexy.  He has served as a peace officer in this section for the last twenty years, first as a deputy marshal under the Paris federal courts, which then had jurisdiction over the old Indian Territory, and later a deputy under the federal courts established here.  He was appointed as state enforcement officer by Governor Cruce, resigning a few months later.

 

McLemore, Lee was commissioned on November 30, 1868 and June 11, 1869, in the District Court at Van Buren,  Arkansas, serving under Marshal Joseph Rowland.  On May 11, 1871, he was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, when the court was moved.  Deputy Marshal McLemore was living in Fort Smith, Arkansas when commissioned in 1871. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

McLillarn, A. D. served in the Central District in 1894. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

McManus, W. H. was commissioned in the Western District of Arkansas in 1899. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

McMasters, John was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, serving under Marshal Jacob Yoes.  In August of 1888, he was summoned to Indian Territory to serve a warrant of arrest to Robert Crawford for introducing liquor into Indian Territory.  His prisoner was taken to the federal jail in Ft. Smith to await trial.

(Ft. Smith Elevator - August 24, 1888)

 

McMillan, D. P. was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

McMurray, T. B. was assigned to the Antlers area, Choctaw Nation in January of 1900, when he arrested Punn Colbert who was wanted for larceny.  Deputy Marshal McMurray went to Goodwater, Choctaw Nation, to arrest three prisoners, placing them in the Antlers jail.  In February of 1900, Randall Henry, Ben Smith, Ed Henry, and Alex Smith were arrested for grand larceny by McMurray then taken into custody at the Antlers jail.  In April of 1904, McMurray was appointed field deputy marshal for Garvin, Choctaw Nation, by Marshal George K. Pritchard over the Central District of Indian Territory.  In 1906, James Kelley tried to rob a general merchandise store at Idabell, Choctaw Nation.  The citizens of the town saw the robbery taking place when the outlaws entered the general merchandise store.  The townsmen fired at the outlaws as they were leaving the store.  James Kelley was hit several times by gunfire which kept him from escaping with his cohorts.  Deputy Marshal McMurray was summoned to transport Kelley to the Atoka jail where he awaited trial. 

(The Antlers Democrat - January 19, 26, February 16, 1900) (Woodward Bulletin - April 1, 1904) (The Choctaw News - June 2, 1904) (The Durant Weekly News - March 2, 1906)

 

McMurray  

T.

B.

D.U.S. Marshal

March 21, 1905

 

McMurtrey, Allen M. was commissioned on February 5, 1896, while living in Nail, Oklahoma Territory. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

McMurtrey, John Wallace was commissioned on August 5, 1889, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, living in Poteau, Choctaw Nation.  John later served as jailer in the Central District of Indian Territory at the Atoka jail.  A forty by fifty foot brick two story building served as a jail for the Choctaw Indian police and deputy marshals.  The ground floor had three apartments.  One apartment was for the jailer and guards, the second was for the white prisoners and the third was for the colored prisoners.  The upper story had four apartments for women.  One for white women, one for colored women and restrooms for each.  The jail operated until 1913.

(Indian Pioneer History - Joe Southerland) (U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 -1896) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

McMurtry  

John

D.U.S. Marshal

South McAlester

March 11, 1905

 

McNac, Wallace C. worked under Marshal John Carroll in the Western District of Indian Territory at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  In January 1889, Deputy Marshal McNac rode with Deputy Marshals Sevier, Salmon, John Barnell and Dave Rusk near Okmulgee to try to capture murderer Wesley Barnett who was charged with the murder of Deputy Marshal John Phillips.  Barnett would not be arrested without resisting the officers which led to a gunfight where the outlaw was killed. 

(Black Red and Deadly) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

McNally, James was commissioned in Oklahoma Territory in 1895, serving under Marshal Evett Nix. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

McNamara, P. J. was commissioned on August 2, 1894, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

McNamara, R. F. was commissioned in the Southern District Court of Indian Territory at Paris, Texas, from 1894 thru 1896. 

(U.S. Deputy Marshals, I. T. & O. T., 1893 - 1896)

 

McNamara    

R.

M.

D.U.S. Marshal

Pauls Valley

March 11, 1905

 

McNeary, John F. was commissioned on June 5, 1886, in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. 

(Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Oaths of Office) (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

McPenore, Lee was commissioned in 1868, serving in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.

 (Ft. Smith Historical List)

 

McPhetridge, Ted was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.

 (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database)

 

McStravic, Dick was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  He served with Deputy Marshals Bud Ledbetter, George Goodell, Ben Cobb and Dick Downing. 

(Muskogee Daily Phoenix - January 10, 1922)

 

McWeir, John was commissioned in the Western District at Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  John was killed on July 2, 1883. 

(Oklahombres) (Ft. Smith Federal Court Employee Database) (Ft. Smith Historical List)